"Whereareyoueatingtoday?"

Translation:¿Dónde comen ustedes hoy?

5 months ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

I wrote "Dónde tu comes hoy" which was rejected. Is this correct or am I.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Claire083

I think they marked you as incorrect because you forgot the accent - tú = you, tu = your. The conjugation was fine though.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theMoviegoer

I used the accent, and I was marked wrong. Donde tú comes hoy

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Did you also include the accent with "Dónde"? It's the interrogatory accent (my term) that alerts the reader that your sentence is a question.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaRataBlanca

No, the reason it was rejected is because the proper word order is Donde comes hoy? The "tu" is not necessary

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HugoBrutus1

Necessary or not is it still correct?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Yes. And Duolingo doesn't usually mark an answer wrong because an accent is missing. It gives you credit for the response PLUS a note saying "Pay attention to accent marks". As I say below, Duolingo seems overwhelmed because there are so many ways to translate the sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4
MattPotter4
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¿Dónde comes tú hoy? Where eat you today?

I also saw it wit the formal somewhere in DL

¿Dónde come usted hoy?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christina.Soto

Why does the pronoun (Uds.) go after the verb (comen) instead of before?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

For the same reason it does in English: "Where are you...?" It is helpful in written Spanish where there is no tone of voice and in spoken Spanish where the tone of voice may not be clear.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF
0KyfnlOF
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I did the same. Surely both are correct?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

I used the gerund form ("estás comiendo") which is probably wrong in Spanish, because the gerund implies "right now" not just "today". But the program gave me a different correct answer: "¿Dónde vas a comer hoy?" It appears Duolingo is overwhelmed by the myriad ways to translate this simple question.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christowns581396

Yes i got the same and so far in the course the answer they gave had not been part of the learning ... not good!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

I guess the difference is that the translation above is plural as in: "Where are you all eating today" which is clearly not what was asked. If the formal form was required I believe it would be: "Dónde come usted hoy?" Either way I still think our translation was correct!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nonie382966

why is "dónde ustedes comen today " not accepted? Por favor ayuda

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Maybe because you used the English word "today" instead of the Spanish "hoy"? Just a guess on my part.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nonie382966

You are so right! Thanks for nor using the word "idiot"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

It never crossed my mind. I make the same sort of mistake all the time. We do go back and forth between languages with each exercise, so a little confusion is to be expected.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe205219

I used ; ?donde tu comes hoy? why is that not acceptable?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oripavine

it is the wrong word order. ¿Dónde comes tú hoy? should be accepted, but "tú" is only used if you want to emphasize it, otherwise the second person singular is implied in the verb "comes"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HansEnsink

¿Donde ustedes comen hoy? was not accepted by DL.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oripavine

Not accepted due to incorrect word order "ustedes comen" vs "comen ustedes"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Are you sure? Because of its complex conjugations and wider range of pronouns, my experience is that Spanish is pretty flexible when it comes to word order.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Dónde needs an accent, but as I point out above, DL doesn't usually mark an answer wrong over a missed accent. I hope you reported what seems like an error.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loopnode

I wrote "¿Dónde eres comiendo hoy?" & was marked wrong. Why, because "eres" is the present & the question isn't talking about the present? I'm not sure.

DL's correction was "¿Dónde va a comer hoy?"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

You are right that "eres" is second-person singular present (i.e., "You are"), but that's not the problem here. Rather, you have the wrong verb. "Eres" is the second person singular of "Ser"; but one has to use "Estar" with a gerund, so it would be "Dónde estás comiendo hoy?"

But even that isn't exactly right, I don't think. Spanish seems to use gerunds only for actions that are underway at the very moment the sentence is spoken. So in Spanish we would use simple present, "¿Dónde comes hoy?" (Where are you eating?) or the compound future, "Dónde vas a comer hoy?" (Where are you going to eat?), but no form of "ser" applies.

As I said, there is that issue of immediacy with a gerund. I think "¿Dónde estás comiendo hoy? would only be used if you were on the phone with someone who was in the middle of a meal. But "hoy" implies a period of 12 to 24 hours, while the gerund implies "right now".

PLEASE NOTE: I'M NOT A NATIVE SPEAKER. IF I HAVE ERRED, I HOPE SOMEONE WILL CORRECT ME.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loopnode

OK, gracias. I'm not always sure when to use the "ser" or "estar" verb form, although I basically understand the difference between the two. Your explanation seems to make sense to me, so, I'm buying it. ;-)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

I gave you too much info. I'm amazed you got anything out of it. I should have just said "estar" is used with a gerund (verb form ending in "ing" in English or "ndo" in Spanish), and added that sentences concerning place also take the "estar" form.

So it's is "Dónde estás?" (Where are you?), but "De dónde eres?" (Where are you from?). The difference is that where you are changes (estar), but your country of origin does not (ser). Hope this helps. At least it's shorter.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Just so you don't get discouraged, let me add that one gets used to which form of "to be" (estar or ser) should be used. After awhile you don't have to try to reason it out, just like you get used to words being feminine or masculine, most of the time without thinking about it. That's just one reason why the new roll out, with so many drills, is so valuable.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loopnode

I don't feel discouraged (yet) and know it'll take time. Your last comments help clarify when to use which verb form, at least until the next time I forget & confuse the two again. Thanks for the great assistance.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

I didn't mean to imply that I never mistake the two. I do. Just not as often as I once did.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lospolloshombre

How is comes different from comen? I was only given the choice of using comen and ustedes. The answer was "¿Dónde comen ustedes hoy?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fred499805

THe answer DL gave me was "Donde va a comer hoy" That is a future tense and this answer could be present tense.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephanie645502

Ok, Though I am a fairly new beginner, I decided to answer the question with presumption of you as tú and therefore comes. My trans. was "Dónde estás comes hoy." DL corrected to "Dónde vas a comer hoy." the discussion translation presumes plural you all and it also presumes that the answering individual will go some where to eat other than right here, whether the person is aquí en mi casa; or aquí en el parque; or aquí de la playa. Surely if DL is going suggest that the person is going to be in some form of "Ir" in order to eat, the question would have contained something like "Where are you going to eat today? I feel a little irritated to be expected to include "vas" in the question presented. And why is there a difference in the translation presented on this discussion page from the various versions which have been corrected on the various students lessons as presented on this page. I do not for a moment believe that DL has been overwhelmed but perhaps the mano de izquierda y la mano de derecha are unfamiliar with each other . In any case, I am not clear why my translation is wrong.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Wow, Stephanie, there's a lot to unpack here! You are confusing two different meanings of "ir". The good news is that the Spanish usage is the same as the English.

In both languages, "ir" and "to go" can refer to space AND/OR time:

"Yo voy a la tienda." I go to the store. (space)

"Yo voy a ir a la tienda esta tarde." I am going to go to the store this afternoon. (time + space)


Your original response ("¿Dónde estás comes hoy?") was incorrect because when "estar" is used as an auxiliary verb (sometimes also called a "helper" verb), it must be followed by another verb in some form other than the present tense. It may be followed by an infinitive, a gerund ("ing" verb in English), or a participle (which we haven't covered yet). You used "comes", which is present tense and isn't used with the auxiliary "estar". You should have responded with "¿Dónde estás comer hoy?" Where are you eating today?

"Ir" (voy, vas, va, vamos, van in the present tense) can also be an auxiliary verb when it refers to time.

"Yo voy a la tienda." I am going to the store. (space)

"Yo voy a comer un sándwich." I am going to eat a sandwich. (time)

Ir + infinitive is a simple form of referring to the future, one that can be used by almost anyone even before we learn the conjugation of future tense. When "ir" refers to time without a reference to space, the action can be anywhere, including "here".

DL was just trying to be helpful, as am I.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kvargm
kvargm
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Why can't this be donde estas comiendo hoy? No puedo leer tu mente.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oripavine

In Spanish the gerund is only used for actions going on right now. Its only used in this case. I assume that something like "dónde estás comiendo ahora" could be said in Spanish. In English the gerund it is used for ongoing but also more general situations. This is different in Spanish and it's a situation where one can't translate 1:1 from English to Spanish.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kvargm
kvargm
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Dónde comes hoy sounds weird though, because unless they are eating right now, then it should be in the future like Dónde vas a comer hoy.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattPotter4
MattPotter4
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¨Comes aquí manaña¨ is literally ¨you eat here tomorrow¨and is one of the three correct ways to state future in spanish ;

that is , A sentence with a future verb. ¨Comerás aquí¨ (you will eat here).

, a ¨going to¨construction, ¨vas a comer aquí¨ (you are going to eat here)

or a present tense verb with a future reference word ¨Comes aquí manaña¨ (you eat here tomorrow). Though correct in Spanish this third construction is obvious incorrect in proper English.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oripavine

I think the problem is that you take the English sentence structure and try to convert this 1:1 into Spanish. In English we are using the ~ing form much more frequently than in Spanish. In Spanish the progressive form "estar plus the present participle" is actually only used in to emphasize that something is done right at this moment (but not in the near future which was indicated by the word "hoy"). For example, some one calls you and asks you what you are doing and you respond " I am eating" then in Spanish the progressive form "estoy comiendo" would be used.

The Spanish present tense e.g. "comes" is equivalent in English with either "you eat" or "you are eating" The "ing" translation might sound weird in English, but I would try to understand sentence or word structures from the Spanish end. Take for example the order of adjectives, "un vestido rojo", literally translated into English as "a dress red" which sounds weird, but that's the way it is done in Spanish. There is no value in arguing that it should be "un rojo vestido" instead. Same is true for present tense translations of verbs.

In regard of "vas a comer", this structure can be used for future action, the English translation however would be "going to eat" (here the "ir + a =infinitive" structure in Spanish can be translated into English 1:1.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Except that you left out two accent marks, it can be "¿Dónde estás comiendo hoy?"

If DL marked it wrong, you should report it.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Microboss

I thought it meant singular person

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Why? The prompt (in English) can be singular or plural.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

Main problem is that at least for this phrase DL seems to literaly not know or even care about the simple difference between usted and ustedes

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

I believe if DL does not want to correct this exercise then it should be deleted as it is clear from these comments that no meaningful conclusion about Spanish can be drawn from it

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

My goodness, you are taking this stuff personally! If DL hasn't corrected to accept the singular, it will do so when somebody gets a chance. Again, none of this goes on our personal record. Yes, "usted" or "ustedes"--or even "tú"--should be accepted because all are correct translations of the English "you". But, frankly, it is the English language that is the problem, not DL, which is why we have all sorts of regional variations--"ya'll", "youse", "youse guys", "you people", etc.--for when we need to indicate the plural. If DL does NOT correct the exercise, then those who come after us should report it again.

1 week ago
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