"¿De dónde son ellas?"

Translation:Where are they from?

4 months ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rpZ3zRRO
rpZ3zRRO
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"From where are they?" should also be accepted as right (but is not).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JosephByrnedub

I agree

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/STEVESches

In English, either way works. Either where are they from or from where are they.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MalindaMcA
MalindaMcA
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Actually, "where are they from?" is not grammatically correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhargr1
lhargr1
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No preposition at the end of a sentence is highly debated. If it's what the majority of English speakers say then it's not incorrect, it's just new.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

You're partly correct. The current general rule of thumb is to avoid a preposition at the end of a sentence if removing it sounds clumsy.

However, regarding "what the majority says is correct", I disagree.

According to statistics, 50% of U.S. adults can't read a book at an eighth grade level.

20% can't read a newspaper 19% of high school graduates are functionally illiterate

16% of high school students don’t graduate.

Based on ACT scores, only 51% of HS seniors who take the ACTs score high enough to be ready for college .

The problem of functional illiteracy is getting worse.

The reason the we teach reading and writing is assist with communication.

The reason we have developed a "standard English" is to assist with effective communication.

Try reading old English, with its inconsistent spellings.

As a college professor, I have had college freshman who could not write a coherent paragraph.

"Effective communication" requires that there be common standard forms of communication that are understood by all involved.

When a student says "You know what I mean" I often have to say that I don't; because what they are saying literally doesn't make sense. I can guess at what they mean to say, with probably a high degree of accuracy, but it is still a guess until the writing or the speech is cleaned up and clarified.

References: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/ending-a-sentence-with-a-

https://education.cu-portland.edu/blog/education-news-roundup/illiteracy-in-america/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2016/11/01/hiding-in-plain-sight-the-adult-literacy-crisis/?utm_term=.890bc9456060

https://www.creditdonkey.com/illiteracy-in-america.html

https://fee.org/articles/did-public-schools-really-improve-american-literacy/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2016/10/27/u-s-high-school-graduation-rate-is-up-but-theres-a-warning-label-attached/?utm_term=.5eef9072b02b

https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED507600.pdf

https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED507600.pdf

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krizzards
Krizzards
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I'm curious what British English speakers think about "dangled prepositions." I've been playing with the idea, that the habit might be higher in regions where German was the native tongue until a century ago. I live in the Midwest in a region where German was spoken until WWI. Putting a preposition at the end of the sentence is really common, but it used to drive my English grandmother crazy. I've been also noticing trends in English in America where our English is more influenced by Spanish speakers. Drives me nuts that I cannot use "Mama & Papa" in English for DL Spanish & German as that is what we use in my English speaking family.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laz63
laz63
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Where are they from is ending a sentence with a preposition, which is NOT proper English.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maggieshort1

Why is ellos wrong?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KermitRainman
KermitRainman
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Given the (admittedly rather old-fashioned) rule about no dangling participles, "From where are they?" should be accepted. I reported, and it appears that others have too, but it is still not accepted.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Do you mean: "No dangling prepositions"?" "From" is a preposition.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KermitRainman
KermitRainman
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LOL... Yes, you're right. That's what I meant to say. Participles.. Prepositions... They're both "P" words... :)

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Yes, I often misspeak/ write when the initial letters are the same.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaudetteB691862

I agree with rpZ3zRRO

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane821964
Jane821964
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Either "where are they from?" or "from where are they" should be accepted. In English it is not good use of language to start a sentence with a preposition. Most people do it, but the less commonly used but more grammatically correct answer should be accepted.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

I believe you have confused the rule that "in English, it is not good to FINISH a sentence with a preposition.

When following that rule, one can start with a preposition.

Thus "from where are they" is perfectly good English.

Also, I am not clear about to which sentence you refer when you speak about the "more grammatically correct answer".

Many would argue that both are grammatically correct.

14 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InvincibleDL

De donde son ellas means "Where are they from"! You're talking about women in this sentence but Where are the women from would be De donde son las mujeres! I hope this post was helpful to you!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

English doesn't have a gender word for "they." "Mujeres" is not in the Spanish. Nor does it need to be.

In both Spanish and English, context tells a lot. However, context is not need here to translate the DUO sentence.

4 weeks ago
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