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  5. "These skirts cost a lot."

"These skirts cost a lot."

Translation:Estas faldas cuestan mucho.

June 16, 2018

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rainie960442

why not muchas...what does mucho connect to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clark231

Mucho connects to the money / cost. It isn't a lot of skirts (muchas) the cost is a lot (mucho)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phreedz

good explanation.. no more, no less


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon67264

I went from "why on earth was I wrong?" To "oh... ok fair enough.. i got it wrong" ...an excellent explanation thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noz891688

Could someone please explain to me why the translation is "Estas faldas cuestan mucho" and not "Estas faldas cuestan muchas"? Why wouldn't mucho need to match number and gender in this instance?

Dictionary.com tells me that "a lot" is "a noun and adverb". Online and pocket dictionaries say "mucho" is an adverb, adjective, and pronoun (!). OK...?, but, I attended math and science schools where learning the parts of speech and how to parse were, ah, not valued. So I don't know how to apply the English vs Spanish parts of speech to this sentence to grok DL's translation of "a lot" in this particular sentence. Help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

Mucho is modifying the verb cost here (telling how much), not the noun skirts. So it's an adverb, which doesn't change its -o ending.
Adjective (agrees): Tengo muchas amigas. No quiero mucha ensalada.
Adverb (stays -o): Las chicas trabajan mucho. Me gustan mucho las faldas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noz891688

Wow, thanks! I need to go turn this into flashcards...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AjithaMC

Sorry I gave the lingot here by mistake... I did give a lingot to Marcy65brown though as that was my intension


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyza486374

oh boy... gonna have to screen cap this reply.. I feel like I'm going to forget this... thank you.. it makes sense, i just need it to stick :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mate168569

Me too. Rules just turn into alphabet soup after a while.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3qyv3nrb

Great idea! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David816249

Best explanation i have read on DuoLingo yet. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AjithaMC

Best explanation ever. So excited about it that I may even forget it...wow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trholter

Thank you thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilipOrourke

Great answer, mucho thanx.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Proyd

That would have to be muchos thanx, because thanx is plural.

Although since "thanx" is feminine in Spanish, it oughta be muchas thanx. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rsNl6wgF

Thanks, I made the same mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb-Barrow

aahh, nice! great explanation, that really makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike567421

Thanks for the great explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieA851301

Really clear, thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mac662543

That helps tremendously! Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark285276

Thanks so much for your help! This one has been a mystery for me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoydCendan

marcy65brown

Not the hero we need, but the hero we deserve.

Saludarte


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julie689924

Thanks. I actually understand this explanation - though I'm not certain I'll be able to put it into practise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElaineBryc

Thank you for the great explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruthie748421

But "cuesta" is feminine. Makes it confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdNed2

It certainly is confusing! Because it was not cuesta but cuestan. Anyway, verbs don't have gender, and both cuesta and cuestan are verbs.

It's true that many feminine nouns end in a, and masculine nouns end in o. But verbs end in those letters too. Don't worry, it sorts itself out after a while.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucy673847

Thank you so much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick679926

I write it down rather than screenshot it, hoping that might help it "stick" Lysa486374 It don't always work ☹


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick679926

Cheers for that. I've copied it down word for word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick679926

Cheers for that. I've copied it down word for word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraGalesa

These skirts cost a lot - a lot applies to cost so it's an adverb. In Spanish, adverbs are invariable, so it's always mucho.

A lot of skirts - so a lot cannot be an adjective, because it needs the of. However, mucho is an adjective because you can apply mucho directly to a noun, where it has to agree with it (muchas faldas).

How many skirts do you have? A lot. - some dictionaries say that a lot here is a noun, some say it is a pronoun. In any case, you would translate A lot by Muchas to agree with faldas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomgoldie1

So, "muchas faldas cuestan mucho"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elenabuena

"A lot of" is an idiom; so it doesn't need to be parsed or included in grammatical agreement. "many" or "much", on the other hand, are adjectives and are fair game for agreement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria300649

I have the same question, but just love your use of "Grok"!! (I share your love of language and good sci-fi!!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoneLelen

When to use "mucho" and when to use "mucha"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rune450654

This is a massive problem for us who don't analyze before we speak. I value momentum in a conversation. I am deaf dumb and blind when it comes to differentating between adverbs and adjectives. Let alone put them in correct order. It's a true pain to get through these when there isn't a clear logic unless you belong to the small group that thrive on analyzing grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VickiFord3

Why mucho rather than muchas? I read the comments below, but in this lesson, there seemed to be an example using vestidos and muchos. And it wasn't marked wrong. But it is late. Maybe I just misremembered? Can one of the lesson makers weigh in on this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark285276

Hi Vicki, take a look at the top of this page at marcy65brown's reply. That should clear it up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blaabloop

Estas faldas se cuestan mucho? Why is this wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasEnns1

I would appreciate any/all insight into the difference between cuesta and cuestan. When do you use each?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdNed2

Verbs change form depending on the subject of the verb. In English we have it costs and they cost. Notice the difference? Costs and cost. In Spanish it works similarly but is much more extensive. This is called verb conjugation.

SpanishDict shows the conjugation of all verbs. You can just look them up. At this early stage, only look at the first column, the Present tense.

https://www.spanishdict.com/translate/costar

"Costar" means "to cost". For "he/she/it costs" you say "cuesta" and for "they cost" it is "cuestan".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alvina387654

Marcy65brown. Excellent explanation. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linda250231

Why mucho with faldas????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isabelle716242

Why cietan and not cuestan?

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