"¿Qué almorzamos hoy?"

Translation:What are we having for lunch today?

5 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jdebesche
jdebesche
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"what are we having today for lunch" should be accepted, not only "what are we having for lunch today"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Agenou
Agenou
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jdebesche - Some people may say it that way, but it's non-standard. It's much better to keep "having for lunch" together.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

No, Agenou, saying "What are we having today?" is less often used but IS standard. The thing to remember is that English has a very loose syntax when it comes to adverb placement. What this means is that usually you can place adverbs anywhere within the complete predicate (which is defined as all of the words attached to the predicate verb). That's why "What are we having for lunch today" and "What are we having today for lunch" both work.

In fact, English complex sentences, which use various combinations of verbals and subordinate clauses, often place the adverb at the beginning or end of the sentence and set off that adverb with a comma. If the adverb is at the sentence's beginning, it is called an introductory element; if it is at the end, it's called a closing element.

An example of an opening adverb set off by a comma: "Today, what we are having is asparagus soup immediately followed by a cold pasta entree and, finally, by a dessert of homemade ice cream." Stylistically, I made the adverb a parenthetical introductory element in order to build up the suspense about the menu, but I could just as easily written "What we are having today is asparagus soup followed immediately by a cold pasta entree and, finally, by a dessert of homemade ice cream."

An example of a closing element set off by a comma: "Today, what we are having is asparagus soup immediately followed by a cold pasta entree, and, eventually, by a dessert of homemade ice cream, if that is all right with you." Stylistically, you use commas to set off a parenthetical closing element. In this second example, the adverb "today" is placed in a syntactical position that gives it less importance. Notice also how the different use of the commas give a different flavor to these two very similar examples.

Finally, an example of a closing adverb set off by a comma: "I'm telling you the truth, honestly!"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Agenou
Agenou
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I understand about adverb placement and complex sentences. But I maintain that keeping "having for lunch" together is preferable to allowing additional words to come in between.

Take the example where it's not just a single word (today) that is put in between, as in "What are we having when you come back from the store for lunch?" Clearly, while that's understandable, it is not as clear as if "having for lunch" had been kept together.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Changing the word order changes the emphasis. We have more opportunity to do so in English.

I guess we could back-translate "What are we having for lunch today?" to "¿Qué tenemos para almorzar hoy?"  and maybe then rearrange it to "Hoy, ¿qué tenemos para almuerzo?" , but I'm not sure whether this would actually be used this way by a Spanish speaker.

I also suggest that "¿Qué estamos comiendo para el almuerzo hoy?"  might be appropriate, but I would appreciate advice on that too.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thotyana

But it says hoy which means "today" you can't just leave that out

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeverlyFei

what are we eating for lunch today, should be accepted eat lunch was accepted for other answers. It is correct.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeverlyFei

what are we eating for lunch today, my response is also correct. Eat lunch was also accepted for other answers.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lindsay443746

Didn't sound very clear!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol785477

The translation I got was the past tense!!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

"Almorzamos" is the same conjugation in both present and preterite tense.

So the sentence can mean either:

"What are we having for lunch today?" or

"What did we have for lunch today?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
Maria696768
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DaveHarris809825 i wrote exactly what do we have for lunch today and i got it wrong

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Once enough people report that they got the wrong tense, it will get corrected and you will get a nice thank-you e-mail from DL.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Actually, I don't think they should have given it as an answer because it's out of place in respect of what has been cocered so is obviously a mistake, but the verb is actually the first person plural past preterite (i.e. what had we..? or what did we have..?) as well as the present tense. What's the betting that as soon as they correct this mistake someone puts the past tense answer, gets told it's wrong and then comes on here to moan about it?

3 months ago
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