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  5. "Señorita, ¿cuál es su número…

"Señorita, ¿cuál es su número de teléfono?"

Translation:Miss, what is your telephone number?

June 16, 2018

118 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christinef291986

If "cual" is Which...why not que? And I translated it originally as "which is" thinking we were picking a number (say off a list) Very confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZiggyGong

The way that I was taught the distinction between "qué" and cuál" is that "qué" asks for a simple definition, an explanation, or specific information. So "¿Qué es su número de teléfono?" would require an answer like "My phone number is a combination of seven digits preceded by a three-digit area code." Whereas "¿Cuál es su número de teléfono?" is asking, literally, which phone number is yours, but, in English, we say "What is your phone number."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimezwei

This is really helpful - THANKS!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agestia

Muchas gracias, your answer muy muy ayuda


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdhithyaKR5

Muchas Gracias! Tu explicaciòn es muy buena!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorentzBlo

Excellent definition!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ineffable_Ari

A fellow DL user, Majklo_Blic, explains this so well. I'll quote him. "In general, Qué is used when asking for a definition, or when there are few or no restrictions on what the answer might be. (¿Qué onda? What's up?)

Use cuál when there's a restricted pool of answers to choose from. (¿Cuál es tu número? What's your number?)

Cuál can also mean "which." (¿Cuáles de los gatos son tuyos? Which of the cats are yours?)

Throw Majklo_Blic a follow :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dandeto

I reported it. Which should be correct IMHO, since "cual" is literally translated to mean "which" and still marginally makes sense almost 100% of the time in English. "Which phone number (out of all of the phone numbers) is yours?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anna503480

Su should be= her Why does it mean your ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcy65brown

Su = his, her, your (Ud. and Uds.), their, and its.
In Duo's sentence, they're addressing a woman as "Miss" and using the formal "your".
"Su" could have other meanings here if there were some context, but without it, "your" is probably the most likely meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasWa843871

"Su" can be "your" in the sense that "you" can be "usted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolle87005

no its not. su means your, not her


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasWa843871

"Su" is the third person possessive pronoun. "Tu" is an informal "you" and therefore second person. "Usted" is the formal "you" and therefore third person. When showing possession by a third person noun/pronoun, you use the third person version, thus "su." Thus talking to someone you respect, you would say "su numero," whereas talking to a casual acquaintance, you might say "tu numero." In late modern English, there is only one form of "you" for both formality and number, so we just say "your" in either case. In an older form of english, "su numero" would be "your number" and "tu numero" would be "thy number," but erring on the side of formality became so prevalent that the informal version has been dropped from common usage entirely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CurtSmith3

Nicholas, while I understood the usage of "su" already, this explanation was very helpful and informative, and helped me understand why the language is like this. Thank you for taking the time to write that out!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacquirozd

Thanks. i thought su could only be used with usted. That's helpful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joro299564

Still confused coz it,s not logical


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

"su" is the polite form, "tu" is the form you might use with close friends and family


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AMacEireann

This puts it clearly and simply. ¡Gracias!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gina85350

Wow oldestguru, thank you for your short and easily remembered answer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraWis17

Why su and not tu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helenita275659

First, I would like to say that the second (singular) person of the speech, "You", can be translated into "other expressions", other than "Tú".

These expressions are:

Usted

Señora

Señor

Señorita

If for "Tú" the possessive pronoun is "tu", these "other expressions" of Second Person use "borrowed" the possessive pronoun "su", of third person (the same is true for conjugation of verbs).

SECOND PERSON OF THE FORMAL SINGULAR

You, your =

Usted, su

Señor, su

Señora, su

Señorita, su

Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Señorita is a formal addressing, so you need to use usted grammar when talking to her. The possessive adjective for usted is su.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BurakKemalKara

why cant we use que instead of cual ? really confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

In short, "¿Qué es...?" asks for a definition, and "¿Cuál es...?" asks for an answer.

  • ¿Qué es un número de teléfono? - What is a phone number?
  • ¿Cuál es tu número de teléfono? - What is your phone number?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duckwantbread

Unfortunately the translation of "what" isn't as simple as a one to one translation. "Cual" sometimes means 'what' in sentences where "qué" is not appropriate to use. As has been said elsewhere if there are only a limited number of options to choose from (even if there are thousands of options, like with phone numbers) then 'cual' is likely the correct option and "qué" would be incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolingo.hc

ONCE AGAIN: lady, madam, señora, señorita... ALL MESSED UP Duolingo does not have a clear translation on these terms... please correct asap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spiceyokooko

Señorita - unmarried lady = Miss

Señora - married lady = Madam or shortened form Ma'am.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

Duo has been terribly inconsistent with the English translation for señora & señorita. There was one place I used "Miss" for "señorita" & was corrected with "Lady". This time I use "Lady" & was corrected with "Miss". Please, please!!! I know exactly what each of these words means!!!! It is so frustrating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LlamoLLynda

Question, shouldn't the person you are addressing the question to be within the question mark brackets?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

No, the addressing itself is happening in a separate clause. And that clause is not part of the question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muchkov

so how do you say "Miss,what is his/her phone number?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Depending on the context, it could be expressed with just the same sentence. Or, less ambiguously, "Señorita, ¿cuál es el número de teléfono de él/ella?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sabine959064

Ms should be accepted, few say Miss any more


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metarsios

Why is "Lady" not accepted. On previous units it was.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Lady" is sometimes a somewhat awkward addressing. "Miss" would generally be better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim368232

Why do we have married specific titles for women and not men? I used Ms and it was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Europe used to be pretty patriarchic, so it mattered a lot to a woman's status whether she was "taken" by a man or still available. A lot of the continent is rolling back on it, though, and at least some countries have abolished the addressing for unmarried women.

"Ms" is an abbreviation and should only be used when you also mention that lady's (last) name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ren897511

I thought that su means his or her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Su is the possessive version of all pronound that use 3rd-person grammar, meaning it goes with él and ella, but also with usted, ellos, ellas, and ustedes. So su can translate as "his", "her", "its", "your", or "their".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bri445415

Got is wrong because I put Ms. instead of Miss even though a similar question suggested Ms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The abbreviation "Ms." (just like "Mrs." and "Mr.") should only be used in front of the name of that person, not as a standalone addressing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewWatt520781

why su instead of tu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

We're addressing the miss as señorita here, which is a formal addressing. So in this sentence we have to use usted grammar, and su is the possessive form of usted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliemarie871772

Why do they use su instead of tu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2641

Since we're calling her "señorita" instead of her name, that means we need to use "usted" instead of "tú" and therefore "su" instead of "tu".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sauromatum

So, cuál in English can mean: What, Which or Who. Duolingo has marked me wrong for using What before. This time I used Which, and was marked wrong. So, which/what it is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Which of cuál and qué you use for which English question word depends heavily on its context.

That said, "Which (of these) is your phone number?" is also an appropriate translation of the Spanish sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khyraen

You have to translate the ideas, not word for word. How do you express this same idea in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Synamon6

Why wouldn't it be "tu" instead of "su" since senorita is informal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Señorita is a formal addressing. Any addressing that isn't just the first name or a family member term is formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gillian2058

I translated the English question exactly as written above and Duolingo wants me to use telefonico ( which is Italian). I’m unable to get past this lesson without spelling Telefono as telefonico


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Did you leave out the de? Telefónico is the adjective of teléfono, so "número telefónico" would be a valid translation here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bar315333

it seems strange to me that he asks for her phone number, yet he uses a formal addressing.. wouldn't "tu" more appropriate in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Señorita is a formal addressing, so you usually go on with usted grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillUlrich1

Señorita, ¿cuál es tu número de teléfono? seems to mean the same thing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Señorita is a formal addressing, so you should continue with the usted form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugenePear

if señorita means, miss or lady, then why not also Lady, what is your telephone number?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

I don't think you use "Lady" commonly as an addressing in English. Unless it's a noblewoman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterRKillick

I do not follow the distinction between su and tu meaning "your"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Su is the general 3rd-person grammar possessive adjective. In this special case, that means it's going with the formal "you" form, usted. Since you're addressing the lady with the formal señorita, you need to continue with usted grammar and hence use su.

Tu is the possessive form of the informal .

  • Señor, ¿usted me dice su número de teléfono? - formal
  • María, ¿ me dices tu número de teléfono? - informal

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterRKillick

Very helpful. Many thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayRasher

Please explain how to differentiate between tu and su.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Su is used when you're talking about the possession of él, ella, ustead, ellos, ellas, or ustedes. Since you're addressing the person in this sentence as señorita, she's going to be an usted, so su is used here.

Tu is used for talking about the possession of , which are usually people you'd address with their first name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aileenbowers

Can anyone explain why the "su" translates as your and not "his" please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

You could also ask that lady for "his number", but it's more likely that you're asking for the number of the lady herself. Since you're addressing her as señorita, you're using usted grammar, and the possessive adjective for usted is su.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aileenbowers

Thanks, I understand now due to your simple explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keenoy

I clearly remember Duolingo said 'Miss' for 'La Señorita XXX' and young lady for 'Señorita' and now it suddenly changes with no clear reason. It sucks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Use "miss" when you're addressing someone, and "young lady" (or similar) when talking about someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/li1breU2

Why is su, not tu used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Señorita, and basically any other form of addressing that's not the first name of the person, or a family member term, is a formal addressing, so it requires you to continue using usted grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maddie237711

In speaking, could i simply ask for someones "numero" instead of "numero de telefono", or will the meaning not come across properly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Su número" on its own will be assumed to be one's phone number in most situations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cashew462064

Misses should be also accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Misses" is a form of the verb "to miss" or the plural of the noun "miss".

If you want to address a woman, you should use "missis" or "missus".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrkevjm

Why not Ms. in translation if you are conversing in the US. Don't really hear anyone using Miss anymore


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Mrkev, the abbreviation "Ms." should only be used together with the surname of the lady. "Miss" is the usual standalone addressing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lovesymbol

Why did DL mark my answer wrong when I used "Ms" instead of "Miss"? That seems very petty to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Lovesymbol, abbreviated titles like "Ms", "Mrs", "Mr" or "Dr" are only used in front of the name of that person. If you don't mention their name, you usually either spell it out ("miss", "doctor") or use different titles ("madam", "sir").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssSMASHhh

Why is it "su" and not "tu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Smash, we're addressing the lady as señorita, which is a formal addressing, so we need to continue with usted grammar here. Su is the possessive form of usted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenriqueDe634067

Why can't it be "tU (not "tÚ") instead of "su"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Henrique, we're addressing the person formally with señorita here, so we need to use usted grammar in this sentence. Su is the possessive form of usted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TejalModi

Cual es tu numero de telefono? Shouldn't this be the answer.. Why Su not Tu


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2641

"Tú" is reserved for people you're on a first-name basis with. Since you're addressing her as "Señorita/Miss", you need the polite "usted", which takes all of the same grammar as "él/ella".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattBracci1

Do Spanish speakers say "phono" nowadays rather than "telephono" or has that change not happened to Spanish like how in English almost no one says "telephone"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoodbyesAreWeird

They dont. They say 'Tele' not 'Phono' At least from what I speak and have heard. It is the same for English, modernization and different dialects have resulted in English speakers saying 'Phone' not 'Telephone'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeaDea129609

I didn't put the coma so i got it wrong really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2641

No, the correction algorithm does not look at punctuation. From now on, please either copy and paste or take a screenshot of your full, exact asnwer so we can help you see the real reason why it marked you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorrisZhan

why 'su' here is 'your' not 'her'??
anyone who can reply pleaseee mucho gracias!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2641

Please read the other comments on this page, where this has been explained several times before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZivkovicVuk

I said "Lady what is your phone number" and it didn't accept the answer as correct... Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2641

It's considered very rude in English to address someone as just "lady". A far more appropriate translation would be "Miss, what is your phone number?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khris699655

"Ms." is a correct substitute for "Miss." Please correct your website.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisFindlay

telephone number and phone number is the same thing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtefehShar

I think lady is a correct translate for "senorita" but duolingo didn't accept it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aniyahilator

Why are we using "su" instead of "tu"? I thought "su" was for his/her...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aniyahilator

Why is it "su" and not "tu"? I thought "su" was his/hers...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maureen567661

I wrote it exactly right and it keeps marking it wrong why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianPatri386491

cual is defined as which.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeReid488852

Cual="which" (or "who" if of a person), "que"= what, in my understanding. "What" being a general question while "which" is a choice from alternatives. IMO "Señorita, ¿cuál es su número de teléfono?" should be "que" unless theres a list of numbers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

That general rule only works if you have any other verb than ser after the question word. For example:

  • ¿Qué quieres comprar? - What do you want to buy?
  • ¿Cuál quieres comprar? - Which one do you want to buy?

But when the verb is ser, this application doesn't work anymore. In that situation qué will ask for a definition, and cuál for specific information instead:

  • ¿Qué es un número? - What is a number?
  • ¿Cuál es tu número? - What is your number?

Also when asking about people, you pretty much always use quién.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moh567859

I think there's a mistake they used ( su ) for (your ) instead of (tu)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gillian2058

You and su are possessive pronouns. Tu is used for you (informal). Su is used for he, she, it you (formal), or they.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/merkavar

I am 99% sure senorita was translated to lady earlier, no i use it and it says it should be madam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khyraen

When speaking about a woman in English, calling her "a lady" is complementary, whereas addressing her as "lady" is generally considered abrupt if not outright rude.

Acceptable: The lady has a very beautiful house. She is a smart lady. What was that lady's name?

Rude: Lady, I have another napkin? I disagree, Lady.

We would use miss when addressing a person and lady when speaking about the person to someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khyraen

American English, CA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_clown

"What is your phone number lady" sounds weird in English, especially in a business conversation.

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