"Señorita, ¿cuál es su número de teléfono?"

Translation:Miss, what is your telephone number?

4 months ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/christinef291986

If "cual" is Which...why not que? And I translated it originally as "which is" thinking we were picking a number (say off a list) Very confusing

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZiggyGong
ZiggyGong
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The way that I was taught the distinction between "qué" and cuál" is that "qué" asks for a simple definition, an explanation, or specific information. So "¿Qué es su número de teléfono?" would require an answer like "My phone number is a combination of seven digits preceded by a three-digit area code." Whereas "¿Cuál es su número de teléfono?" is asking, literally, which phone number is yours, but, in English, we say "What is your phone number."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ineffable_Ari
Ineffable_Ari
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A fellow DL user, Majklo_Blic, explains this so well. I'll quote him. "In general, Qué is used when asking for a definition, or when there are few or no restrictions on what the answer might be. (¿Qué onda? What's up?)

Use cuál when there's a restricted pool of answers to choose from. (¿Cuál es tu número? What's your number?)

Cuál can also mean "which." (¿Cuáles de los gatos son tuyos? Which of the cats are yours?)

Throw Majklo_Blic a follow :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OMullan

Exactly...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dandeto

I reported it. Which should be correct IMHO, since "cual" is literally translated to mean "which" and still marginally makes sense almost 100% of the time in English. "Which phone number (out of all of the phone numbers) is yours?"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anna503480

Su should be= her Why does it mean your ?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Su = his, her, your (Ud. and Uds.), their, and its.
In Duo's sentence, they're addressing a woman as "Miss" and using the formal "your".
"Su" could have other meanings here if there were some context, but without it, "your" is probably the most likely meaning.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasWa843871

"Su" can be "your" in the sense that "you" can be "usted."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicolle87005

no its not. su means your, not her

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasWa843871

"Su" is the third person possessive pronoun. "Tu" is an informal "you" and therefore second person. "Usted" is the formal "you" and therefore third person. When showing possession by a third person noun/pronoun, you use the third person version, thus "su." Thus talking to someone you respect, you would say "su numero," whereas talking to a casual acquaintance, you might say "tu numero." In late modern English, there is only one form of "you" for both formality and number, so we just say "your" in either case. In an older form of english, "su numero" would be "your number" and "tu numero" would be "thy number," but erring on the side of formality became so prevalent that the informal version has been dropped from common usage entirely.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CurtSmith3

Nicholas, while I understood the usage of "su" already, this explanation was very helpful and informative, and helped me understand why the language is like this. Thank you for taking the time to write that out!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joro299564

Still confused coz it,s not logical

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oldestguru
oldestguru
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"su" is the polite form, "tu" is the form you might use with close friends and family

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingo.hc
duolingo.hc
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ONCE AGAIN: lady, madam, señora, señorita... ALL MESSED UP Duolingo does not have a clear translation on these terms... please correct asap.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiceyokooko
spiceyokooko
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Señorita - unmarried lady = Miss

Señora - married lady = Madam or shortened form Ma'am.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chiu1551
Chiu1551
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Duo has been terribly inconsistent with the English translation for señora & señorita. There was one place I used "Miss" for "señorita" & was corrected with "Lady". This time I use "Lady" & was corrected with "Miss". Please, please!!! I know exactly what each of these words means!!!! It is so frustrating!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BurakKemalKara

why cant we use que instead of cual ? really confusing

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duckwantbread

Unfortunately the translation of "what" isn't as simple as a one to one translation. "Cual" sometimes means 'what' in sentences where "qué" is not appropriate to use. As has been said elsewhere if there are only a limited number of options to choose from (even if there are thousands of options, like with phone numbers) then 'cual' is likely the correct option and "qué" would be incorrect.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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In short, "¿Qué es...?" asks for a definition, and "¿Cuál es...?" asks for an answer.

  • ¿Qué es un número de teléfono? - What is a phone number?
  • ¿Cuál es tu número de teléfono? - What is your phone number?
1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigManTheo

Is this sexual harassment at the workplace? Seems relevant.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shadowofthemoon
shadowofthemoon
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Most likely these are simply some job appliction questions: cuál es su número de teléfono / su correo electrónico (we'll notify you on our decision), etc... or they might be doing some job for the client and they need to let her know when it's done. Plenty of options...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

In order to avoid sounding rude in English we would move the Miss to the end of the sentence but DL doesn’t accept that. Reported.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtOfFHP

@BigManTheo I think the clue is in the "su" - which indicates the Spanish formal "your"... So no, no sexual harassment at the workplace, just a polite, formal enquiry for a phone number.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/netwide

Is he saying that as a stalker..?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merkavar

I am 99% sure senorita was translated to lady earlier, no i use it and it says it should be madam?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/the_clown
the_clown
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"What is your phone number lady" sounds weird in English, especially in a business conversation.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorothyMad6

I said Lady for senorita they said i used the wrong word its madam.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sauromatum

So, cuál in English can mean: What, Which or Who. Duolingo has marked me wrong for using What before. This time I used Which, and was marked wrong. So, which/what it is?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Which of cuál and qué you use for which English question word depends heavily on its context.

That said, "Which (of these) is your phone number?" is also an appropriate translation of the Spanish sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LlamoLLynda

Question, shouldn't the person you are addressing the question to be within the question mark brackets?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, the addressing itself is happening in a separate clause. And that clause is not part of the question.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Synamon6

Why wouldn't it be "tu" instead of "su" since senorita is informal?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Señorita is a formal addressing. Any addressing that isn't just the first name or a family member term is formal.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroDanie741446

Señorita cual es su número de teléfono?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gillian2058

You are missing the point of my

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gillian2058

I translated the English question exactly as written above and Duolingo wants me to use telefonico ( which is Italian). I’m unable to get past this lesson without spelling Telefono as telefonico

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Did you leave out the de? Telefónico is the adjective of teléfono, so "número telefónico" would be a valid translation here.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bar315333
Bar315333
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it seems strange to me that he asks for her phone number, yet he uses a formal addressing.. wouldn't "tu" more appropriate in this case?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Señorita is a formal addressing, so you usually go on with usted grammar.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Georgeloui765237

Earlier they took lady as the right answer for senorita .

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oldestguru
oldestguru
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Finally something useful!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithCople

I said what's instead of what is and was marked wrong.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillUlrich1

Señorita, ¿cuál es tu número de teléfono? seems to mean the same thing!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Señorita is a formal addressing, so you should continue with the usted form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugenePear

if señorita means, miss or lady, then why not also Lady, what is your telephone number?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I don't think you use "Lady" commonly as an addressing in English. Unless it's a noblewoman.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArtOfFHP

I'm a native British English speaker and in short, "Señorita", "Señora" and "Señor" don't translate very well to British language or culture. The best analogy is probably that of an upmarket (pretentious?) hotel or restaurant environment, where staff addressing guests/customers as simply "Sir", "Madam" or "Miss", may be viewed as polite, but these days may also be viewed as overly servile.

However, understanding that you can never make a direct translation or comparison between languages and cultures is always one of the joys of learning.

Talking of which - in my circles, addressing someone as simply "Mister" or "Lady", as in "Lady, what is your telephone number?" would be viewed as incredibly impolite/ill-bred (i.e., badly brought up and rude)!!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterRKillick

I do not follow the distinction between su and tu meaning "your"

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Su is the general 3rd-person grammar possessive adjective. In this special case, that means it's going with the formal "you" form, usted. Since you're addressing the lady with the formal señorita, you need to continue with usted grammar and hence use su.

Tu is the possessive form of the informal .

  • Señor, ¿usted me dice su número de teléfono? - formal
  • María, ¿ me dices tu número de teléfono? - informal
2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterRKillick

Very helpful. Many thanks

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterRKillick

what is the distinction between su and tu ?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muchkov

so how do you say "Miss,what is his/her phone number?"

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Depending on the context, it could be expressed with just the same sentence. Or, less ambiguously, "Señorita, ¿cuál es el número de teléfono de él/ella?"

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/netwide

Reported August 2, 2018 for sexual harassment sentence. :(

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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This sentence is probably uttered by some office clerk who needs the lady's phone number to be able to contact her while working on her case.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacobGriffiths6

Who says telephone number?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

We do

3 months ago
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