"Do you like running in the park?"

Translation:¿Te gusta correr en el parque?

5 months ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RanjeetKaurav

Why both ti and te are used here? What's the rule to follow?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tachpro92

From what I have learned from native speakers, the 'a ti' here is used to add emphasis to directing the question to the person. Kind of like if you are have a conversation with two other people, one of them is telling you how they hate running. You then ask the third person...."and you, do you like to go running?"(a ti te gusta ir a correr? It's not just a general question to someone, (te gusta ir a correr ). The same with 'a mi'. You might be talking with someone about a restaurant you both like and what your favorite things there are. The friend is saying how they like the beef there. Replying....'a mi me gusta el pollo' is like saying ."'Myself, i like the chicken". It just adds an emphasis to yourself.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamOli122431

This makes much sense to me. Thank you for this explaination

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

Can it not be dropped? A ti

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Yes.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/STEVESches

I need an explanation here. When I look this up on line people answer te gusta, not te ti.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jennifer1848

I don't understand the "A ti" at the front of the sentence. Would think the Te gusta correr en la parque would be correct.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peter.yaco

"Do you, you like running" Would be my guess, idk lol

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kesslerramirez

Why would it be "gusta" instead of "gustas". Shouldn't it be conjugated for the tú form?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redsassafras

No. Verbs match the subject. With "gustar" the subject and object are reversed from what would be common in English. The subject is the thing being liked and the object is the person.

English: I (subject) like the apple (direct object).
Spanish: Me (indirect object) gusta la manzana (subject).

Substitute "te," "le," "nos," or whatever into this sentence and "gusta" does not change. Substitute "las manzanas" for "la manzana," though, and "gusta" becomes "gustan."

When "gustar" is followed by an infinitive verb as in the example given by Duolingo ("te gusta correr"), "gustar" is conjugated to the third person singular. Hence, "gusta."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ozymandias615884

Thank you kindly, redsassafras. Can you point to any other verbs that follow the same subject-verb relationship i.e. 'encantar', 'odiar' etc. ?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Odiar does not follow that same pattern.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ozymandias615884

'A ti te odia correr en el parque' is bad Spanish then? Se un buen hombre y cuantame como expresar desden por los pasatiempos/actividades, amblamente.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlowerEagle

I don't know if this is correct, because I am remembering this from many, many years ago. The way I think about "me gusta" is that it translates literally as "it pleases me" rather than "I like."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesLefor1

The only thing i can think of is that "a ti" is a very personalized form of "you" and is used before te in this case to convey affection and/or respect.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jannie548460

The english sentence is not: And you, do you like running in the park. So how should we understand that we should translate it that way??

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bweera
bweera
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This adds to my already confused Spanish learning experience. But I will keep on going no matter what.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AntwanSell

Again, duolingo never explain stuff. I hate it when they just throw this at you and don't explain how to use it properly.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1Pcmyhrt

how do you know when to use "tu/ti" and "usted"? No clue in the sentence

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luz_ly2222

Ok

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasper2000

Why "A ti te" , why not "tú"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pablo982888

"Do you" turns into "A ti te", while "you" is "tú" o "ustedes"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Syno-chan
Syno-chan
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"You" can be both translate into 'tu' and 'a ti".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

Plaza??????

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamOli122431

I am not sure how punctuation are applied in Spanish, but it would read better if there was a comma between ti and te. In english it would be "And you, do you like running in the park"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel825557

Why can't "corres" work instead of "correr"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rakovaker
rakovaker
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What if I need to use 'usted' or 'ustedes' or 'vosotro/as' instead of 'tú'? What will it be?

Will it be just 'usted gusta correr'? Or will it be 'a usted gusta correr'? Or will the form of 'usted' change?

I have so many questions about these possible translations of 'you' :) Can someone please write these sentences for all of them?

2 weeks ago
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