"Mein Hund ist schnell."

Translation:My dog is fast.

April 27, 2014

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayamoo22

Whats the diffrents between mein/meine?

April 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

"mein" is used for singular masculine or neutral, "meine" is used for singular feminine or plural

"mein Hund" "meine Katze" "mein Buch" "meine Hunde"

April 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vaprrenon

THANK YOU!!

Man it would be nice if Duolingo actually explained things like this instead of leaving us to our own devices.

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucyyschh

Well we have to test our abilities and be able to answer things for ourselves. Be glad some native speakers actually take this course :)

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vaprrenon

What are these abilities you speak of? XD

June 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juanc30

Well, we're learning as if we were native speakers. Just by memory and mechanization of the language.

December 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimpossibl252132

They do, just not on the app. On the website its pretty easy.

October 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZiadHelou1

All are explained in the website in details...

September 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martinjanecko

Thanks it help me lot :)

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DurantCurryGSW

Danke, du bist richtig

May 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swaggieboysam

How to identify that in the question?

August 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

What do you mean? Do you mean "How to make this into a question?" If so, there are two ways:

1) "Mein Hund ist schnell?" with rising intonation at the end. 2) "Ist mein Hund schnell?" with inversion and rising intonation.

August 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

You have to memorise the gender of each noun when you learn it.

Look up the noun in a good dictionary and it should tell you whether it is masculine (m), feminine (f/w), or neuter (n).

Best to learn each noun with its article, e.g. not "Hund = dog" but "der Hund = the dog" so that you know that Hund is a der word (masculine).

August 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kozjol

I typed "My dog is slow"

...

time to get myself checked out

May 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJDDawg2

Don't worry, I almost made the same mistake :). But then fortunately I remembered the old Afrikaans word snel (must be from Dutch) that means fast, but isn't really used any more, these days in Afrikaans we use the word vinnig

May 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamazingXD

Thank you for adding what it means in your language! It's helpful and also interesting to hear what it is in other languages

May 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aron89ification

I find it humorous and ironic that the word schnell means "fast" instead of "slow", given that it sounds a lot like "snail"! :)

August 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

Yes. it is the kind of mental association i have to fight when learning another language.

February 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ABurrowingBird

Heh. To me it sounds a bit like slide, or slippery, and slippery things slide fast, so it makes sense to me. :P

April 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XeniaWasHere

Why is it not "meinen Hund?" I saw on another forum that nouns that are neutral (using "der" instead of die or das) need an extra "n" tacked on. Is this selectively applicable? A Duolingo exercise used "keinen Käse".

January 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Actually, "Hund" is masculine, not "neutral". "Mein" becomes "meinen" when the noun is an object. "I see my dog" -> "Ich sehe meinen Hund".

January 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheepKitchen

In this case, it's mein Hund because it's the nominative noun in the sentence - the subject in other words. The -en ending on masculine nouns appears when the noun is in the accusative. Nouns in the accusative case have an action being done to them.

Der Hai isst meinen Hund.

The shark eats my dog.

The shark is Der Hai, not Den Hai, because it's the subject. As the dog is having an action done it, being eaten, it's accusative and takes the -en ending.

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EinenHund

why can't I say 'my hound is fast'? It's the same, is it?

April 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArizonAmerica

I'm afraid not. Not every dog is a hound,but every hound is a dog.

July 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

According to the Larousse German- English online dictionary "the hound" (noun) = "der Jagdhund".

December 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StefanMeijlink

Can this be heard as either "Mein Hund ist schnell" or "Mein Hund isst schnell"? or is the second one wrong?

September 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarinationX

I'm not entirely sure, but I think you'd literally be saying "My dog eats fast." As if fast is something that can be eaten. Again, I'm not 100% sure on that.

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EveSutherland

You couldn't say isst because when talking about animals eating, you use the word frisst.

October 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/western5ta

I agree, "fressen" is for animals, while "essen" is for people... BUT.. if you wanted to be cute about it, you could switch that around to say something like "Meine Frau frisst" .. My wife is eating (like an animal). Mein Papagei isst .. My parrot is eating (delicately, like a person).

May 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DJDDawg2

SarinationX is correct with his/her answer, because Mein Hund ist schnell means My dog is fast, where as Mein Hund isst schnell means My dog eats fast which then is bassicly is a total different meaning

April 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Yes it could be so heard. "Schnell" (in the base form with no adjectival ending), as well as being an adjective meaning "fast" or "quick", can also be an adjective meaning "quickly". As stated elsewhere, though, animals "fressen" rather than "essen".

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

This is a strange topic. I just tested out of these "Possessive Pronouns" and every single so-called "Pronoun" was actually an adjective....

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethankreuz1

what's the difference between mein and meinen

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Perhaps https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mein#Adjective would help to answer your question?

February 18, 2019
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