"Másdespacio,porfavor."

Translation:More slowly, please.

6 months ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan

The English translation is too litteral. A more natural translation would be: "Slower, please".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cranberry4848

Accepted on 7/18/18

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doggiehx

Accepted on 9/30/2018

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atomic_brunette

Again on 10/1/18

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DorothyLisa

I agree.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saramayple

For the record, "more slowly, please" is 100% fine in English. And a more accurate translation as well.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vascotuga251

is "Despacito" another form of "despacio"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NachoLibre32350

Sadly, yes.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan

Yep

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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It's only for colloquial use though.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lmparis49
lmparis49
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Slower, please

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coopsters1

Spanish doesn't have er and est endings

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkle1027

I thought slow was "lento"..?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanYen

I had learned "lentamente" - is this a European vs. American usage like "nevera" vs "refrigerador"?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Nevera vs. refrigerador vs. frigorífico vs. refrigeradora vs. heladera? :)

Despacio vs lentamente isn't really a regional thing, but there are some differences in meaning between those two. While lentamente only means "in a slow manner", despacio also has the meaning of "bit by bit", "carefully", or "quietly". Lentamente is used more to describe processes, while despacio is more frequently applied to people.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparkle1027

Gracias.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilAlvare

How is "despacito" used?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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More colloquially. It's the diminutive form of despacio, and diminutives in Spanish are often used to intensify something. In this case, despacito is more around "very slowly, carefully, step by step".

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kurtschwoc

I learned this lil cutie forever ago and i find myself saying it frequently to native speakers. It helps me out a bunch.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McNistor

This must be one of the most useful phrase I've learned lately :P

22 hours ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

slow down, please

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSt5

No, never heard of it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cameron.Nann

More slow

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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Slow, slower, slowest. OR more/most slowly.
'LY' adverbs generally take more/most form. Thus, you can't say 'more slow'. It would need to be 'more slowly.'

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rox186
Rox186
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"More slowly please" is not grammatically correct English.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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Actually, it is grammatically correct, since slowly us an 'ly' adverb. But it is not uncommon to hear "Slower, please" also.

https://www.ef.edu/english-resources/english-grammar/comparative-and-superlative-adverbs/

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankJnlan

Agreed

6 months ago
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