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  5. "Más despacio, por favor."

"Más despacio, por favor."

Translation:More slowly, please.

June 16, 2018

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankJnlan

The English translation is too litteral. A more natural translation would be: "Slower, please".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cranberry4848

Accepted on 7/18/18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doggiehx

Accepted on 9/30/2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saramayple

For the record, "more slowly, please" is 100% fine in English. And a more accurate translation as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScoCoda

It's not a natural translation. "The music is pleasing to me" is a more accurate translation of "Me gusta la musica" than "I like music" but it doesn't at all reflect how people normally speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vascotuga251

is "Despacito" another form of "despacio"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EPOSantos

It's a diminutive form, you can say. We also use it in Portuguese with several words.

I don't know exactly how to explain why we do it, but we use it a lot. So, I guess, Spanish speakers do it too.

Sometimes it's to make the sentence sound more softly, delicately, gently... Something like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DevNull.PT

Yes, diminutive forms are very common in South American countries (not sure about Brasil) specially in names.

My opinion is the same as yours, with the diminutive form we soften stuff... for instance, "a minha casinha" in Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zcla71

Yes, it's common in Brazil as well. If you see "inho" and "inha" at the end of a word, it's probably a diminutive: Ronaldinho, mãezinha (mommy), paizinho (daddy)...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomR007

Diminutives were also used a lot in Latin, too, so it makes sense that the Romance languages would make good use of them.

An example in Latin is the word 'avunculus'. It means maternal uncle (French 'oncle', and by extension English 'uncle,' are descended from it), but it comes from the word 'avus' meaning grandfather. So it literally means little grandfather


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alezzzix

It's only for colloquial use though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McNistor

This must be one of the most useful phrase I've learned lately :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionknowno

I agree. When people speak Spanish, to me at least, they speak it really fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coopsters1

Spanish doesn't have er and est endings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benji1547

?? mejor = best


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurtschwoc

I learned this lil cutie forever ago and i find myself saying it frequently to native speakers. It helps me out a bunch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sparkle1027

I thought slow was "lento"..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanYen

I had learned "lentamente" - is this a European vs. American usage like "nevera" vs "refrigerador"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Nevera vs. refrigerador vs. frigorífico vs. refrigeradora vs. heladera? :)

Despacio vs lentamente isn't really a regional thing, but there are some differences in meaning between those two. While lentamente only means "in a slow manner", despacio also has the meaning of "bit by bit", "carefully", or "quietly". Lentamente is used more to describe processes, while despacio is more frequently applied to people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/butterscotchmrrw

Super helpful. Now I know how to ask someone to speak slowly. I had been using lento. Have a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsjustkoopa

id say something bout this translation cuz its weird but i fear duolingo owl


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThiagoStul

Is more slowly coreect? I dont think so!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"More slowly" is the technically correct adverb form. But the distinction between adverb and adjective is slowly going away in English, so "slower" is also often used in connection with a verb:

  • Please speak more slowly. = Please speak slower.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diana168742

Why not much slower, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

That would be "muy más despacio". Despacio on its own only means "slowly", so "más despacio" makes it "more slowly", literally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilAlvare

How is "despacito" used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

More colloquially. It's the diminutive form of despacio, and diminutives in Spanish are often used to intensify something. In this case, despacito is more around "very slowly, carefully, step by step".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuilhermeM94609

When you read that and the possibilities of "dirty" usage starts flowing through your mind (ಠ‿ಠ)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayMc1025

Okay, question: Does "much slower" not work for "mas despacio?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

No, that doesn't work. The más in the Spanish expression is already the '-er' in the English translation, so you don't get to add another degree.

  • slowly - despacio
  • slower - más despacio
  • much slower - mucho más despacio

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brichar54

Yah, Duo...mas despacio, por favor!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizbethCha626243

I didn't get to speak! That wasn't fair!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Lizbeth, if that happens more often, make sure that Duolingo has permission to access your microphone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSha54814

Yeah, you marked us wrong on things like "the car of John" which at least is correct, but then you have "more slowly"?? Five year olds make that mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuperAwesome84

More slowly is bad English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Superawes, "more slowly" is correct but traditional English. If you need to form a comparative of an adverb, you'll generally do so with "more" and "most":

  • He started walking more quickly.
  • This was the most excitedly I ever heard him speaking.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woody852299

according to my friend from Monterey Mexico my answer 'slow down, please' should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin993895

Perhaps Duolingo can take this advice into consideration? Love this app, but make the speakers like 10 or 5% slower please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmerMamoun2

That's what she said


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaSt5

No, never heard of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazCon

Slow, slower, slowest. OR more/most slowly.
'LY' adverbs generally take more/most form. Thus, you can't say 'more slow'. It would need to be 'more slowly.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatehmammad

That just doesn't sound right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rox186

"More slowly please" is not grammatically correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazCon

Actually, it is grammatically correct, since slowly us an 'ly' adverb. But it is not uncommon to hear "Slower, please" also.

https://www.ef.edu/english-resources/english-grammar/comparative-and-superlative-adverbs/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rocitos

Of course it is. You can put a wide variety of adverbs in place of slowly. More passionately, more quietly, more quickly, more interestingly, more alertly, more tastefully, and so on.

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