1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "¿Sabes nadar bien?"

"¿Sabes nadar bien?"

Translation:Do you know how to swim well?

June 16, 2018

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Opri-Amira

Is it do you swim well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenn579093

Why is this "Sabes nadar bien" .... shouldn't it be "sabes como nadar bien"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunflowerS64420

I think the thing to remember is that translating from one language to another isn't necessarily word for word. It's how each language communicates a particular concept. Sometimes English uses more words to communicate a concept than Spanish uses, and vice versa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manat297076

Exactly. But isn't this "correct solution" word-for-word? And do they mean you know well or you know how to swim well? What does the word well define: the quality of the knowledge or the quality of swimming? The English version seems to imply the last but the the Spanish sentence seems to imply the first meaning. That's what's confusing. I'd appreciate a Spanish speaker to clarify.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerseyUrmeneta

This is a great question. I spoke to my husband (from Honduras) about this, and it took a while for him to understand my question. Hahaha. But ultimately, he said to express the quality of knowing, you would say "Sabes bien como nadar." But he also said this would be more of a statement than a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob46196

The correct solutions should not be word-for-word translations, but the best translation of the meaning of a statement. Ideally that is what Duo tries to do, although they of course make mistakes. In this instance, "saber" followed by another verb, means "to know how to" not just "to know". Sunflower64420 is right. It's not about literal translation, but about understanding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donn134059

How would you say, "do you know to swim well"? Perhaps a swim coach would ask this to chide a swimmer who intentionally lost a critical meet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Saber = "know how". No need for "como".
http://www.spanishdict.com/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chooch639215

So saber should be understood not just to know but to know how? I thought como was used with saber for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShibaInu404614

I went with my instinct and translated it to "Do you swim well?" but it was marked wrong. I guess Duo just wants to reinforce the "sabe -> know know to" translation..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoelBerman1

do you swim well? should be fine. It is impossible to swim well without knowing how to swim.

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.