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"¿Cuándo salieron ustedes de casa?"

Translation:When did you leave home?

June 17, 2018

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

Or even "When did you leave the house?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

It's hard to say that sentence without sounding like you are slurring your words. That's how it sounded the first time anyway. She must have stolen the bottle of wine from the fishes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joseph_Hind

I wish this woman would speak more clearly or that DL would hire someone else.

Joseph


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnParker18

I totally agree with you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mojavejeeper

Why is it not "de la casa"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob534074

Come on! "When did you go out from the house?" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

when did you go out of the house not accepted - reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

Changed my mind on this ... a/de casa referring to home and a/de la casa referring to house so in this case home is right,.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrentaPoole

I put the house" and it still wasn't accepted 2/19/20


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

"When did you go out" is rather clumsy, wordy. Much better is "leave."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellen892121

Why does the word usted need to be there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

I wish Duo also taught the vosotros form (used in Spain) or at least include it in the tips, especially for past tenses and tenses other than present simple. :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Also correct should be "when did you leave from home."

In English, there can be a slight difference between "leave home' and "leave from home."

"Leave home" can refer to "leaving home for good" as in "moving out." "Leave from home" can imply a temporary departure "leave home to go to school".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

SGuthrie, I agree. Did you try ". . . leave from home?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

Would this question usually be: ¿Cuándo salieron de casa ustedes? (rather than putting the subject pronoun in the middle of the verb phrase)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaimFr

"Salieron" is really the form of the verb associated with "ellos" and "ellas". I believe the "ustedes" - "you" plural or "y'all" in American slang - is here to make sure we know we're not relating to "they", but rather to "you" plural, y"all. "Ustedes salisteis" is actually correct but apparently not popular/used. In English "you" is ambiguous and as you can see also problematic. Do you (and you all, y"all) agree with me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

Actually, salisteis is used together with vosotros, not ustedes. Vosotros is the plural form/pronoun used in Spain but not in Latin America.

vosotros salisteis (you plural; used in Spain) vs ustedes salieron (you plural; used in LA)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sikha11793

Isn't ustedes 'they'? except more polite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notosruu

Yes but in Latin American Spanish it's also used for you plural instead of vosotros.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaimFr

In American English there's a huge difference between "I'm leaving home and not coming back" and "I'm leaving the house and I'll be back at six." In Spanish maybe "Yo salgo de casa..." and "Yo salgo de la casa.." ? In my opinion "go out from the house" and "when did you leave from home" are not correct. "When did you get out of the house?" is good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notosruu

To stress that difference I would probably say something stronger like ''me voy de casa'', ''me marcho de casa'' or ''dejo mi casa/mi hogar''. Anyway I don't think 'the article ''la'' would make such a difference, plus some regions in South America use ''la casa'' in the place of ''casa'' so that would be problematic... But that's just me. Maybe some native speakers will share

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