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"¿Cuándo salieron ustedes de casa?"

Translation:When did you leave home?

June 17, 2018

55 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

Or even "When did you leave the house?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bpeppard

Or "When did you leave your house?" When did you "leave home" implies strongly "how old were you when you left home" which is not at all what the Spanish sentence is talking about.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

It can mean "how old were you when you left home", but I don't think that there is a strong implication that that's what it means. As always, the context will make that clear. For example, I think it's typical to use "leave home" in police crime dramas, where a detective asks a person or people, "When did you leave home?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joseph_Hind

I wish this woman would speak more clearly or that DL would hire someone else.

Joseph


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

The sound is generated, not prerecorded.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

I thought it was generated from recorded bits, and that the recorded bits are combined to form sentences. The only basis I have for that is that the individual bits sound to me like real people speaking. If the sounds were completely generated, would it have one voice (the female one) speaking with a South American pronunciation and another (the male) with what might be Mexican pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

I do not know any details, but it seems that both male and female voices (randomly) fluctuate between /j/ and /dʒ/ pronunciation for 'y' and 'll', and female voice has a greater (equivalent of natural) tendency to drop consonants at the end of words. None have (thankfully) the Spanish lisp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

I had to look up the IPA symbols. The whole thing of pronouncing "y" sounds as English "j" or "zh" is very common in South America, some countries more than others. My guess was that Duolingo had real people recording hundreds of words, one at a time, and that the "y" sound would vary a bit from word to word, as it can in actual speech.

I think I hear it more in the female voice. And I agree that she drops those final "s"s all the time. The one thing that I hadn't heard in a real speaker before was not clearly articulating unstressed vowel sounds in final syllables, so that when she says "ellos" and "estos", it sounds like "ellas" and "estas" to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnParker18

I totally agree with you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaMitche89062

It's hard to say that sentence without sounding like you are slurring your words. That's how it sounded the first time anyway. She must have stolen the bottle of wine from the fishes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob534074

Come on! "When did you go out from the house?" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

when did you go out of the house not accepted - reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarethViejoLento

Changed my mind on this ... a/de casa referring to home and a/de la casa referring to house so in this case home is right,.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrentaPoole

I put the house" and it still wasn't accepted 2/19/20


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

"When did you go out" is rather clumsy, wordy. Much better is "leave."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mojavejeeper

Why is it not "de la casa"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellen892121

Why does the word usted need to be there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

It doesn't need to be there. I routinely leave it out, and Duolingo always accepts my answers (unless I make a mistake elsewhere). As Rob1961April12 notes, including "usted" can clarify who left home, but it's not grammatically necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

Without it the sentence can be translated "When did they leave home?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danghard1

Isn't ustedes plural for usted? Shouldn't this be translated then as "When did they leave home?" Isn't "ieron" used for ellos/ellas/ustedes and "ó" for el/ella/usted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

In Spain, the plural you is vosotros (vosotros salís).

In Latin America, the plural you is ustedes (ustedes salieron). This form uses the 3rd person verb form, that's why it might be confusing (since Castillian Spanish (spoken in Spain) uses a special verb form.

So, ustedes salieron isn't they leave, but you (all) leave.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

"Ustedes" is the plural of "usted" (see below for usage), and both are "you" in English (well, "ustedes" is "y'all" in the South, and there are some other interesting regional forms of plural "you" in English). So the translation should still be "you" (or probably "you all" is accepted).

In Spain, they use "vosotros" for the plural of "tú", and "ustedes" for the plural of "usted". But in Latin America, they don't bother with "vosotros"--instead, they use "ustedes" for both the plural of "usted" and the plural of "tú".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

Would this question usually be: ¿Cuándo salieron de casa ustedes? (rather than putting the subject pronoun in the middle of the verb phrase)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FedKaczynski

This is a... strangely normal sentence for the unit with cows in dresses


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SGuthrie0

Also correct should be "when did you leave from home."

In English, there can be a slight difference between "leave home' and "leave from home."

"Leave home" can refer to "leaving home for good" as in "moving out." "Leave from home" can imply a temporary departure "leave home to go to school".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

SGuthrie, I agree. Did you try ". . . leave from home?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaimFr

"Salieron" is really the form of the verb associated with "ellos" and "ellas". I believe the "ustedes" - "you" plural or "y'all" in American slang - is here to make sure we know we're not relating to "they", but rather to "you" plural, y"all. "Ustedes salisteis" is actually correct but apparently not popular/used. In English "you" is ambiguous and as you can see also problematic. Do you (and you all, y"all) agree with me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

Actually, salisteis is used together with vosotros, not ustedes. Vosotros is the plural form/pronoun used in Spain but not in Latin America.

vosotros salisteis (you plural; used in Spain) vs ustedes salieron (you plural; used in LA)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sikha11793

Isn't ustedes 'they'? except more polite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notosruu

Yes but in Latin American Spanish it's also used for you plural instead of vosotros.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

No, "ustedes" is formal (polite) "you", plural. "Usted" is the singular. "They" is "ellos"/"ellas" (plural of "he"/"her").

It's a bit confusing because for conjugating verbs, él, ella, and usted always take the same form, and so to ellos, ellas, and ustedes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewCamm

it sounded like she said a casa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diane101106

When did you leave your house? Should have been accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

I don't agree. There is no sense of "your house" in the Spanish sentence. "Salir de casa" is "to leave home".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert980186

Why can't we say: "When did you leave house?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

Because that's not correct in English. We say "leave home", but not "leave house". We can say "leave the house", but that is not the same, because it could apply to any house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

"When did you leave the house?" is on the list of acceptable answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haleh844940

When did you leave house should also be accepted or provide a proper context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

Absolutely not. "When did you leave house" is not correct English in any context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaimFr

In American English there's a huge difference between "I'm leaving home and not coming back" and "I'm leaving the house and I'll be back at six." In Spanish maybe "Yo salgo de casa..." and "Yo salgo de la casa.." ? In my opinion "go out from the house" and "when did you leave from home" are not correct. "When did you get out of the house?" is good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notosruu

To stress that difference I would probably say something stronger like ''me voy de casa'', ''me marcho de casa'' or ''dejo mi casa/mi hogar''. Anyway I don't think 'the article ''la'' would make such a difference, plus some regions in South America use ''la casa'' in the place of ''casa'' so that would be problematic... But that's just me. Maybe some native speakers will share


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arctinus

I wish Duo also taught the vosotros form (used in Spain) or at least include it in the tips, especially for past tenses and tenses other than present simple. :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

I read in the comments section (not here) that it is offered later in the tree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

Yes, it's offered (but not really emphasized) later on. There are a bunch of exercises where the correct answer shown is in the "vosotros" form, but you can answer with any "you" you like, so it's possible to avoid using it. It will also be shown in Spanish sentences, so you will need to recognize it to be able to translate it as "you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hnafunke

y'all should 100% be an accepted translation of ustedes. if your talking abt one person it's you, if it's plural it's y'all. that's j basic southern facts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

This is strictly personal preference, but I would not accept "y'all" — it is not formal English. I understand why some would prefer to see it here (singular/plural 'you' is problematic enough), I realize that numerous people use it in daily life, yet it is very regional. There is one more reason I am against it: it is often used as singular 'you'. I remember first reading about "y'all" on a tray mat in a Tex-mex restaurant in Boston where it stated that despite its obvious origin as an attempt to pluralize 'you', in modern Southern vernacular it is normal to address one person with a "y'all". Lo and behold, several months later in Texas someone did address me (I was alone) with a "y'all", just as the tray mat told me they might.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

That could be because, as a roommate of mine once declared, "Texas is not the South--it's the Southwest!!" And there's also the chance that the "y'all" extended to a sense of "you and your family" or "you and yours", even if the others weren't there with you then.

I live in the real South (NC), and natives here are very confused if you say "y'all" and just mean one person (or if you say "you" and mean multiple people). It is not done, and I've lived here since 1975.

I am fine with Duolingo's accepting various regional forms of plural "you", because it's not here to represent only formal English. It doesn't want to discourage people by not accepting translations that reflect the way they actually speak. So as long as Duolingo accepts the correct formal usage as well, I don't care how many folksy regional variants it also accepts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hnafunke

mm that's def weird, i've never heard someone say y'all for only one person before and i live in texas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob1961April12

I would never deny your experience. But I am going to propose a couple reasons for that:

  1. You actually did not hear it in all your time in Texas.

  2. You did, but it is so normal, your brain did not register it, since there was nothing out of the ordinary for you.

I vividly remember the moment I described specifically because it was so jarring to hear something that I had both known about and (subconsciously, perhaps) never expected to hear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

I don't know about this particular sentence, but I have seen all kinds of English plural "you"s accepted by Duolingo, including y'all, you guys, and you lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hnafunke

oh really?! wow, then ta¿hanks duo, i always assumed it would reject so i never used it but this day i accidentally did by habit and it was marked wrong :,)

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