"Perdónseñora,¿elaeropuertoestácerca?"

Translation:Excuse me, ma'am, is the airport nearby?

6 months ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dads.Spanish

Why is lady and Mrs. marked incorrect?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBell0

Cos DL have a bee in their bonnet about it for some reason. we wouldn't use a title in there at all in English but your alternatives are better than Ma'am which should, I believe, be translated Dona

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Dads.S... The title "Mrs." in English denotes a married woman. When you don't know her, "M'am" (or "Ma'am," as Duo spells it), is a respectful address.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatsiRed

No, 'miss'' is English, ma'am is American

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonaldPrid

"Excuse me maam is the airport near" is marked wrong.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

RonaldPrid, "Maam" without the apostrophe is not a word. The apostrophe takes the place of the "d" in Madam, and is NOT slang, as someone here said, but the preferred word for respectfully addressing a woman you do not know, or who is in a position to whom one should show deference or respect, such as a teacher or female person you perceive to be older than you are.

If you can see her left hand and she wears no wedding ring, you may try "Miss" instead, which is also fine for young girls.

Where proper manners are still taught, such as the military, saying "Yes, Ma'am/No, Ma'am" is the polite way to address our mothers, as well. FYI, it is more commonly spelled "M'am," in the South, at least. That's the way I've seen it my entire life in the U.S.A., and I would trust that more than whatever Duo's been told. I may suggest that to be an accepted spelling next time I see the opportunity.

Butlers/cooks/maids/servants in the employ of wealthy people may still use the formal-sounding "Madam" as the form of addressing the lady of the house, and "Sir" for the gentleman owner or his older sons, and use "Master Robbie/Phillip/Johnny/Bradley (or whatever their names are) for the young ones; and "Miss Abigail/Lucia/Mary/Constance (or whatever) for the unmarried girls of the family.

Perhaps because of the bad connotation of the definition of "a Madam" being the owner or manager of a whorehouse, the vast majority of America who are Upper-Middle-Class or below would not expect to be addressed as "Madam," although if you had a British accent, that would be fine, just as "Madame" would be, for one speaking with a French accent. :<)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelleGr7

Close = nearby in English

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carolla2

why isn't Lady accepted as well? a lady is a respectful term for a woman..

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr.Cisne
Sr.Cisne
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The use of "Lady" in this sentence might be interpreted as slightly hostile, depending on one's tone of voice. Madam would be a better choice.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/strekkmark

Please change ma'am to one word

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PXrJsyvgjanek

Translating señora on Duolingo is inconsistent, señoras are ladies, but a señora is a madam? That doesn't make sense. Reported this. Ma'am instead of madam is already slang, in any case.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carolla2

I agree with you. I would much rather be called lady than ma'am

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lawerence0

English people very rarely say ma'am but Americans do. There should be a difference between American English and English.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carolla2

there are many slang words in American English. DUO should use the more proper, English, English

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Carolla2, We have proper American English, as you have both proper & some pretty awful British-English slang. Of course there will be regional/Continental differences, but some Americans could justly be insulted by your assuming that if idiomatic phrases are DIFFERENT in our countries, that yours are "proper," & ours are "slang." ...Just sayin'.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard383448

What is wrong with Is the airport close?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

I reckon it is not a very busy one ------ or he's totally lost it : ) ( :

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StealthMaster77

"Excuse me ma'am, is the airport near here?" should be accepted also. Reported this on 6/28/2018.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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"Near here" is "cerca de aquí"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr.Cisne
Sr.Cisne
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...or nearby?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Sr.Cisne, "Nearby" was accepted Nov. 25, 2018.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jewpsy
Jewpsy
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Why "Sorry ma'am, is the airport nearby? " was marked wrong?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane72505

I was marked wrong for "nearby" but that is the way most Americans would express the notion.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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At least in the US, you'd never say "sorry" unless you'd bumped her or stepped on her foot. For asking directions, you say "pardon me" or "excuse me". (You can also use those if you've bumped someone, but you usually also say you're sorry, too. "Oh! Pardon me! I'm so sorry!")

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cruzah

The audio doesn't sound line a question to me!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dawn717205

A a

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John993717

Miss instead of ma'am is more current.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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Round here, unless you're a store clerk, I wouldn't recommend saying "miss" to anyone but teenagers.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SAMujer
SAMujer
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Posted on the Forum, SpanishDict by MacFadden: ¨Hello, and welcome to the forum. Traditionally, this has been the distinction: señorita is like 'miss' in English; it is used for unmarried women. Señora is used for married women. However, Spanish has been having something of a gender equality awareness awakening recently, and, at least in some places, there is a trend toward calling all adult women señora¨. Okay, the followng is my take on this subject, since we will be using Spanish when we travel, I try to ignore a translation, even if it is cringe-worthy, to get on learning Spanish. I myself would not call anyone Ma´am but many people use that expression to get your attention. This is not wrong but when people started calling me Ma´am, instead of Miss, I thought, "did I suddenly get old"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felicia735638

Miss should have been accepted

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard383448

I agree with tessbee, Near here is "cerca de aquí". Who makes up the rule?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul429929

It said "Type what you hear" which I did correctly,and was marked wrong!!!!!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Paul42.., Ha-ha! Sometimes what you think you hear could be a line of gibberish!! What Duo means is to type the proper Spanish words that you hear, that make an intelligible sentence! ;

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeferrara45
joeferrara45
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I used ' close' instead of 'nearby' and it wasn't accepted

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatsiRed

ma'am is not used in English, it's 'miss''

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

recording made as a statement and not a question.

6 months ago
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