"The boy does not want to wear his new shoes."

Translation:El niño no quiere usar sus zapatos nuevos.

4 months ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jean203502
Jean203502
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El niño no quiere llevar sus zapatos nuevos. - This should be accepted by my education from university, therefore i reported this sentence.

4 months ago

[deactivated user]

    I had the same comment. "Llevar" is absolutely appropriate in this scenario.

    4 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Arctinus
    Arctinus
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    I've also reported it (2/7/2018).

    4 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    Jean, you are missing the point of this lesson!

    There is another lesson that pertains to llavar. This one is about learning how to use it usar. Now, while what you said is correct, it does not apply to this lesson. And I recommend you go with usar. It's the ticket!

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    Jean might not be ready to dedicate himself exclusively to this particular Duolingo lesson until after he deals with his feelings. I speak from personal experience because I have lots of feelings to deal with myself. (laughs)

    The post by Arctinus is valuable and we should remind ourselves again about what Arctinus said at the same time that we are digesting the good advice from EugeneTiffany about which direction (here in North America and South America) we really need to walk towards. (thumbs up)

    quote by Arctinus:
    "... if one wants to learn Castilian Spanish (spoken in Spain), Duo not accepting the verb llevar could be a small nuisance. :) "

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/shavuh

    But is "usar" an inappropriate verb for this instance?

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Arctinus
    Arctinus
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    It's not inappropriate, the problem I see is just that in Spain, for example, the verb llevar is more common, so if one wants to learn Castilian Spanish (spoken in Spain), Duo not accepting the verb llevar could be a small nuisance. :)

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    Unfortunately there are vastly more Spanish speaking people in the USA than in Spain, and the number in the USA is right behind Mexico which has the greatest number in the world. And since Mexico and the USA Spanish speaking people are to a large extent related, that makes for a huge combined set of countries. So if you want to learn the Spanish that is mainly being used in the world, you in no way would regard the original way. Not anymore. It's ancient history. It was king, but it's not now. Like it or not.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    On the other hand...

    Good stuff. Thank you. Let's continue with more discussion about Castilian Spanish.

    If I lived in Spain, I would talk like the other people who live in Spain. Castilian Spanish is currently spoken in the country of Spain. I don't expect Castilian Spanish to die in the foreseeable future.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/varieties-of-spanish-3078185

    https://www.thoughtco.com/why-is-spanish-sometimes-called-castilian-3079190

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewHague

    And speaking as a Brit - I'm more likely to go to Spain than Mexico. I might live a bit longer that way!

    4 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewMcMahon

    Also reported this. Llevar is an appropriate verb to use.

    3 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    But Duolingo is teaching us the use of usar here. Why fight it? What's your problem?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Benny_Dorm

    llevar, llevar, llevar, can someone at Duolingo research this verb, it's what people here in Spain (that's where Spanish comes from) use when they want to say "wear". Usar, might be accepted, meaning "to use". Thank you.

    2 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

    Duo actually accepted my answer!
    "El chico no quiere ponerse sus zapatos nuevos."

    4 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    @Bruce768614
    @AnneMacek
    I am likewise surprised to learn that Duolingo accepts ponerse ! The meaning is a little bit different than usar.

    If Duolingo is accepting ponerse, then vestirse should also be deserving of acceptance. Compare the two sentences below.

    El niño no quiere vestirse con sus zapatos nuevos.
    ― The boy doesn't want to dress (himself) in his new shoes.

    El chico no quiere ponerse sus zapatos nuevos.
    ― The boy doesn't want to put on his new shoes.

    4 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jamblamb

    What about traer? El niño quiere traer sus zapatos nuevos? That was marked incorrect for me. Does traer not apply for shoes or am I using it incorrectly?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    @Jamblamb
    Perhaps... okay, I concede this is acceptable. We should not be surprised to discover that there is more than one way to say the same thing.

    El niño no quiere traer sus zapatos nuevos.

    But traer is not my first choice if I am choosing which verb is the best fit. I imagine that a speaker might follow this Spanish (traer) sentence by clarifying the intended meaning of his or her (first) sentence if no other clues are available to the listener. The listener might perceive ambiguity if no other clues are available.

    Qué bien que me haya acordado de traer las botas para la nieve.
    ― Good thing I remembered to bring my snow boots.

    I am open to hearing opinions from others. @Jamblamb What is your opinion?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AnneMacek
    AnneMacek
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    Is vestir allowed?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    What is wrong with the idea of learning to use usar?

    I just don't fathom this reject of the lesson. Why is this being done?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    I perceive a desire to pursue extracurricular studies.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    @AnneMacek
    El niño no quiere vestirse con sus zapatos nuevos.
    ― The boy doesn't want to dress (himself) in his new shoes.

    The foregoing is classified as extracurricular studies. This post should not be confused with the Duolingo exercise that is being discussed on this forum web page. Except for the next paragraph.

    @AnneMacek
    Edit: My answer to your question is stated more explicitly in my other post to you. There is a small difference in meaning.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AlfoJr

    what is the difference between "tus" and "sus"?

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TaylorJim

    Tus = yours (plural) Sus = his, hers (plural). And note that it is the object owned and not the owner that decides the number. Your dog = tu perro, your dogs = tus perros.

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

    @TaylorJim
    AlfoJr already realizes these things that you mentioned.

    The other difference to understand is the difference between formal and informal conversation.

    https://www.thoughtco.com/use-of-familiar-you-spanish-3079385

    https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/%C2%BFpuedo-tutearte.1817424/

    http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/tutearte

    1 month ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AlfoJr

    thank you!

    1 month ago
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