"Quisierauncafésinazúcar,porfavor."

Translation:I would like a coffee without sugar, please.

6 months ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rjjacob
rjjacob
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An American would hardly ever say "a coffee".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PavniJagpa

It should be i would like coffee

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/waikong
waikong
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Depends where in the us i would think. Heard it both ways often enough

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielTap135

Yeah i said I'd like coffee without sugar please, but duolingo says it NEEDS the "a" whats wrong with THAT???

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikka76

I would always say 'a coffee' - It all depends where you're from

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChayaDoppelt
ChayaDoppelt
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How do you say "he would like"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isabel303668

Coffee is a noncount noun which numbers cannot be used with. Use more, another cup etc

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeOBrien12
JoeOBrien12
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I agree that it is more common for people to say "I'll have coffee" and sounds a bit more natural. But "I'll have a coffee" sounds fine too and I've heard it a lot.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikka76

A cup of coffee is a count noun. It's simplified to 'a coffee' rather than 'a cup of coffee' but is still gramatically correct; the cup is implied. If it's not common usage in The States to say the 'a', it is elsewhere, as is the assumption that we are talking about single cups, not endless pours.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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On a different subject: I have noticed that the Spanish speakers (both male and female) put a pause--or breath--between a request and "por favor." When I studied Spanish many years ago, that did not happen. Which way is preferred now?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChayaDoppelt
ChayaDoppelt
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I don't think there's a preferred way or a less preferred way. I think it's pretty much like in English: varies from person to person

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D3act1vat3d_Us3r

Never before in my life nor ever in the future will I say, "A coffee." Reported 11/14/18.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pat92981

"A" coffee seems fine to me.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin
AniOhevYayin
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This sentence is important for a place such as Guatemala where coffee comes with sugar already dumped in, so that it's quite sweet. If you don't like sweet coffee, you'll need to tell the waitress this sentence, to which she will reply "para servirle." The situation with coffee in countries such as Guatemala is complicated. First timers usually think they'll get great coffee, but after having been there for a while or for a second time you become accustomed to the fact that most coffee in country is not very good, because they export the good coffee. A regular cup of Joe in Guatemala can be terrible, even upset the stomach. Exception: hotels and restaurants that cater to the wealthy 1% and tourists.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oddfisher

Normal English usage, (American, at least), would not include "a".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikka76

That's not 'normal' English usage, it's one type of usage: as you said, American. Across the globe English is said in different ways and where I am from, it would be normal to say 'a coffee'.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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It's normal to say "a coffee" in the US too.

4 weeks ago
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