"I like beer a lot."

Translation:Me gusta mucho la cerveza.

7 months ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/2mhnkzrc
2mhnkzrc
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Why is it la cerveza if it's not a certain beer that you like, but all beer?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randy879728

I have the same question. I am very confused because Spanish seems to throw “the” arbitrarily. In this case do I like this specific beer (the beer), or do I like beer in general? Or maybe there is no difference in Spanish and it is always “the” for both cases. Of course it could be just a Duo Lingo translation thing too. Please comment :)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rabidace03

It would be nice if someone would explain this as well

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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I believe it's because in Spanish "beer" is the subject of the sentence and therefore requires a definite article.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deb_cherry
deb_cherry
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My understanding is that if you want to say "I like xxxxx a lot", you have to use the preposition el or la in front of xxxx. If you want to say "I like a lot of xxxx" then you don't have to use the el or la. That's kind of what I have figured out so far. The first is a general preference. The second seems to be referring to a quantity. I might be all wrong but that's how I'm understanding it right now.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naudy875987

Not to be picky, but it's an article not preposition.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin
AniOhevYayin
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The definite article la is optional, because people will know what you mean, but technically it is formal Spanish to use it. Maybe if you say me gusta mucho cerveza it might make you sound like a borracho! LOL

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpanishTea877213

I had to look up the meaning of borracho (drunk). HA!

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

Can anyone confirm if "birra" is also "cerveza" or... is this just in Spain?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin
AniOhevYayin
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Cerveza is more common. birra sounds like spanglish

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

Actually... it seems to be used in Italy.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin
AniOhevYayin
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Gracias. Maybe it's also used in Spanish speaking countries influenced by Italian such as Argentina.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deb_cherry
deb_cherry
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My question is mucho vs mucha. I said "Me gusta mucha la cerveza". Me gusta .... gusta is gustA because beer is feminine. Doesn't the mucho/mucha refer to me (a female)?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

Taking your previous example related when to use (or not) "el" and "la", we can present the following: "I like beer a lot" is translated to "Me gusta mucho la cerveza" ("mucho" is aligned with the verb "me gusta") and "I like a lot of beer" would be translated to "Me gusta mucha cerveza" ("mucha" aligned with "cerveza")... Hope that this example can help somehow.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deb_cherry
deb_cherry
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but if mucho is aligned with me gusta... wouldn't it be mucha if I am female?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JWtYF

It's mucho because it's modifying a verb (gustar) and verbs aren't gendered, regardless of who is performing the action. Gusta isn't a feminine word; it's just the third-person present indicative form of gustar.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AKyper
AKyper
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Me gusta would be gusta no matter if you're talking about a masculine noun. Me gusta el pollo.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian651321

Surely " " a beer " is "una cerveza "

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randy879728

This an interesting aspect of Spanish (and it took me a long time to get it). In English, there is a difference between the following two statements: 1. I like beer = I like beer in general 2. I like the beer = I like this specific beer In Spanish there is no difference. Moreover, Spanish required "the" in front of beer. So they would never say the first and always the second. This is strange to an English speaker, but is the case in Spanish. Therefore, whereas in English one would say "I like yogurt", Spanish would say "I like the yogurt". You will see this in almost all contexts.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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To clarify this a bit. Randy's point is correct because grammatically the sentence [in English] is lirerally saying "beer pleases me a lot". (We translate the meaning into proper English of course). But because we are making a general statement about beer Spanish requires the definite article él/la/los/las - in English we do the opposite and write what seems to be odd English to someone learning it, dropping the article: Lions are dangerous, dogs are loyal, whatever. If we eat lots of cheese the article is not required in Spanish as we are not making a general statement about cheese, it is the object of the sentence so "Como mucho queso" or "Quiero mucha cerveza" or "Tengo muchos perros" are all correct. Hope this has clarified the matter.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimlanier
kimlanier
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Thank you. You have explained a concept that has been confusing for me!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrayNathan

Can someone please answer my question: Is it ALWAYS "Me gusta..."? Would you ever say, "Me gusto mucho la cerveza."?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

Yes, it is always "me gusta" or "me gustan" depending if the object of your likeness is singular or plural:

  • Me gusta la música. / I like music.
  • Te gustan las almendras. / You like almonds.
  • A ella le gustan los mariscos. / She likes seafood.
  • Nos gustan los bebés. / We like babies.
  • Les gusta bromear. / They like to joke around.
  • Tú me gustas mucho. / I like you very much.

Added: Notice the last example when talking directly to the person that you like, that the used form is "(tú) me gustas" (but only when using "tú").

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin
AniOhevYayin
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When learning Spanish, it's best to memorize a few idioms and one is me gusta, "I like," because you will use it a lot. It will take time to get a feel for how the verb works in the examples given by DevNull.PT, such as A ella le gustan los mariscos. There are a list of important verbs that work the same way but getting started with me gusta is a good way to go. An introductory grammar will have a section that you could use to get some further examples. If you conjugate the verb it will mean different things, as the examples by DevNull.PT indicate, such as Tú me gustas, "I like you," which is what someone would say on a date. As you can see, it's important to understand the basic distinction between me gusta frijoles, "I like beans" and Tú me gustas, "I like you."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Debasish731654

why Me and not mi? what is their difference?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin
AniOhevYayin
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mi is a personal pronoun called a possessive adjective as in mi abuela, "my grandma," and it becomes mis when it's in the plural, e.g., mis sobrinos, "my nephews," whereas me is the pronoun when it is used as a direct object, an indirect object, or a reflexive object. For instance, me gusta andar mi bicicleta, "I like to ride my bike" = me is the indirect object of gustar, "it is pleasing to me," mi because it is my bicycle. Mi amigo me dio un regalo, "my friend gave me a gift" in which me = direct object of the verb dar, to give. I recommend googling "how to understand gustarse" and then watch the videos. Buen suerte.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

"me" is the reflexive form for "yo", hence "me gusta" is "I like".

"mi" is the possessive form for "yo", hence "mi coche" is "my car".

Combining the two, you could say: "me gusta mi coche" / "I like my car"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esteban15084

sometimes it wants a mi me gusta, sometimes it does not. It is impossible to tell.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

In "a mi me gusta" the "a mi" is completely optional (with it, you are just reenforcing that it is your personal opinion)... similar to how the "yo" is optional in "yo deseo".

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teelas
teelas
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I thought to express you like soemthing a lot you say A mi me gusta. Your translation looks like u like a lot of beer not you like beer alot

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevNull.PT

"a mi me gusta" only express "I like" without the "a lot" part.

Regarding the "I like a lot" vs "a lot of beer":

  • "A mi me gusta mucho la cerveza" (notice that is "mucho" because verbs are genderless), means that you like a lot;
  • "A mi me gusta mucha cerveza" (notice the missing article "la" and that it's "mucha" because "cerveza" is feminine), means that you just like beer in large quantities.
1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonnaWells5

the correct answer is not correct

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zach227977

Explain your thoughts, por favor.

4 months ago
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