"My Spanish teacher."

Translation:Mi maestro de español.

5 months ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dmethvin
dmethvin
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with "My Spanish teacher" does it mean my teacher who teacher Spanish, or my teacher who comes from Spain? That affects the translation, right?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

I agree...but I bet you would be marked wrong if you left out the "de".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PortAlberni

Your bet is correct. I did, and I was.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StacyBursuk

I was!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

"español" for Spanish (language), "España" for Spain. I have also noticed the "e" is lower case when referring to the language and upper case when referring to the country.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeckyB450496

This is just a phrase...it would depend in the content of the rest of the sentence to know which one was being spoken about.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PadBur

Right! A bit confusing, i though they mean nationality here ))

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trumaine7

What is "de" there for.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
ProfesorAntonnio
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A teacher who teaches Spanish = Mi maestro de español.

A teacher born in Spanish = Mi maestro español (masc) / Mi maestra española (fem)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

Think of it as "My teacher of Spanish", it is easier for me to remember if I just try to think of it that way. Likewise with other school subjects: "clase de ciencias" = "class of science" = "science class".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
ProfesorAntonnio
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Duolingo please accept: My Spanish teacher = Mi maestra española OR Mi maestro español

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bgwmson
bgwmson
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Is not profesor teacher?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slagar1
Slagar1
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One of my high school Spanish teachers had us call her "profesora". She had nothing other than a regular teaching credential.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anka-Maria

Yes, in Spain it is. Duolingo is teaching South American Spanish I am afraid.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teddybear71
Teddybear71
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So how then would you say "My Spanish teacher" (as opposed to "my Venezuelan teacher"), not using the rewriting of the sentence to "Mi maestro es de España"? Would you still have to have the "de" there?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phoenixash4
phoenixash4
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Mi maestra española or mi maestro español both mean my spanish teacher when talking about my teacher from Spain but duolingo doesn't accept them.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silregconer

How can I say 'mi maestro esoañol'? I think that 'my spanish teacher = mi maestro español' and 'my spanish teacher = mi maestro de español' or 'my teacher of Spanish', that I always think it is more correct...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mQ4Sb
mQ4Sb
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Why is 'Mi maestra de español' not accepted?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

Both interpretations should be accepted, given the lack of context. Reported

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel72372

I can't see the accents that I should be using. Where can I find them ?

1 day ago
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