"My Spanish teacher."

Translation:Mi maestro de español.

7 months ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dmethvin
dmethvin
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with "My Spanish teacher" does it mean my teacher who teacher Spanish, or my teacher who comes from Spain? That affects the translation, right?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

I agree...but I bet you would be marked wrong if you left out the "de".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PortAlberni

Your bet is correct. I did, and I was.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StacyBursuk

I was!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kboyer127

It was marked wrong and shouldn't have been

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coco229783

I was marked wrong for leaving the de out

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

"español" for Spanish (language), "España" for Spain. I have also noticed the "e" is lower case when referring to the language and upper case when referring to the country.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damoestice
damoestice
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Mi profesor español - My Spanish Teacher (of spain origin, describes who he is) Mi profesor DE español - My Spanish (describes WHAT the professor does)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeckyB450496

This is just a phrase...it would depend in the content of the rest of the sentence to know which one was being spoken about.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amn0713

You are correct. I think it would be a good idea if Duolingo added a side-note to some of the questions to provide some context in cases like these, where the exact meaning is unclear.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PadBur
PadBur
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Right! A bit confusing, i though they mean nationality here ))

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trumaine7

What is "de" there for.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
ProfesorAntonnio
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A teacher who teaches Spanish = Mi maestro de español.

A teacher born in Spanish = Mi maestro español (masc) / Mi maestra española (fem)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca126402

Think of it as "My teacher of Spanish", it is easier for me to remember if I just try to think of it that way. Likewise with other school subjects: "clase de ciencias" = "class of science" = "science class".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
ProfesorAntonnio
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Duolingo please accept: My Spanish teacher = Mi maestra española OR Mi maestro español

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen898348
Stephen898348
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I reported that and I want Duolingo to accept it, but it is still not accepted.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bgwmson
bgwmson
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Is not profesor teacher?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anka-Maria

Yes, in Spain it is. Duolingo is teaching South American Spanish I am afraid.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slagar1
Slagar1
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One of my high school Spanish teachers had us call her "profesora". She had nothing other than a regular teaching credential.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

my late mother-in-law, who was French Canadian, used to call me "professor", but I was just a teacher....

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teddybear71
Teddybear71
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So how then would you say "My Spanish teacher" (as opposed to "my Venezuelan teacher"), not using the rewriting of the sentence to "Mi maestro es de España"? Would you still have to have the "de" there?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phoenixash4
phoenixash4
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Mi maestra española or mi maestro español both mean my spanish teacher when talking about my teacher from Spain but duolingo doesn't accept them.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silregconer

How can I say 'mi maestro esoañol'? I think that 'my spanish teacher = mi maestro español' and 'my spanish teacher = mi maestro de español' or 'my teacher of Spanish', that I always think it is more correct...

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mQ4Sb
mQ4Sb
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Why is 'Mi maestra de español' not accepted?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brackenwood3

Both interpretations should be accepted, given the lack of context. Reported

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel72372

I can't see the accents that I should be using. Where can I find them ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TGq76vGJ

my spanish teacher refers to his nationality in english please correct this

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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No it doesn't. In English, we call teachers by their subject.

Math teacher, History teacher, Spanish teacher.

It's urnerstood to mean the subject. Even though it might look like it causes confusion, no one ever expects the English teacher to be from the UK.

In English, Spanish teacher means the subject taught by him or her is Spanish. When we mean a teacher from Spain, we say "the teacher from Spain".

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertFairless

You do not ask for my teacher of Spanish but 'my Spanish Teacher' Therefore your answer is incorrect.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmethvin
dmethvin
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"my Spanish teacher" can also mean a teacher who comes from Spain, how would that be translated?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

a good question for Robert

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dnihilist

That would be "Mi maestro es de España"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phoenixash4
phoenixash4
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Dnihilist I think "mi maestro es de España" is my teacher is from spain which isn't the same as my spanish teacher.........even though they convey the same message ( when using the sentence "my spanish teacher...." to signify your teacher is spanish rather than your teacher teaches spanish).

2 months ago
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