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  5. "La falda cuesta doce dólares…

"La falda cuesta doce dólares, señora."

Translation:The skirt costs twelve dollars, ma'am.

June 18, 2018

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannajangg

is it okay to say 'miss', than 'ma'am'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kboyer127

Miss refers to a younger female. Señora translates to ma'am.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tatyanajm

Miss would be used when it is señorita


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneStrauser

My translation as well! But it makes sense that ma'am is the correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joanne254

I think for British english "ma'am" is pretty odd. Not something that people would use naturally, especially not under 50s.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tracy290990

Ma'am is one word it should not be on 2 tiles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuilhermeM94609

Duolingo suggests "lady" as a translation of "señora" - lady can never be used as a translation of "senora", like the comments have pointed out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

Actually, "lady" can be used as a translation of "señora", just as "gentleman" can be used as a translation of "señor". It depends on the context. You can't use "lady" or "gentleman" to address someone--you have to use "ma'am" or "sir". But as respectful terms used in the third person (e.g., "there is a lady here to see you"), "lady" and "gentleman" are fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuilhermeM94609

I've expressed myself really badly. You're totally correct, I meant that it can never be used in this specific context (to address someone). The problem is that duolingo individual words suggestions does not take the context into consideration.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

You are quite right--the suggestions seem to come directly from a dictionary. And yes, addressing a woman as "Lady" is generally not well received, even if Jerry Lewis is the one saying it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helen507316

We never say 'Ma'am' in the UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

I thought that "Ma'am" is how one addresses the Queen after the first time, when it's "Your Majesty".

But assuming that most people don't get to talk to the Queen, what polite term of address do you use for older women? "Madam"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cartersitocubano

In the US, miss can be used to address any woman. I'm guessing it's the same in the UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

It depends on where you live in the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cartersitocubano

I guess so. Although I know plenty of English people who say Ma'am so it probably varies there too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inger-Torill

is missis a bad and wrong word to use for señora?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngryLingoBird

Never in my life have I ever spelled it "ma'am"... that's too extra. I've always written "mam". baha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

Well, for all those who aren't native English speakers and look to these discussions for proper English as well as Spanish, I want to note that "ma'am" is the conventional spelling. "Mam" is a mainly British, informal word for "mother" (just as "mom" is in American English). Writing "mam" for "ma'am" will be considered a misspelling by most.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helbino

North American here. I see "ma'm" written all the time. I've never seen "mam" or "ma'am" written. Not to mention in military settings it's always "ma'm". I've learnt something new about the rest of the world!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

I am also North American (United States), and I had never seen "Ma'm". I was about to say that I could not find it anywhere in online dictionaries or references, but I finally found it in merriam-webster.com under the "Mam" entry. The results of a web search for "ma'm" are overwhelmingly results for "ma'am". Similarly, a search for "ma'm military" turns up only hits for "ma'am military", such as the Wikipedia page for "Military courtesy".

I am not questioning your experience--I'm just saying that mine is completely different: I'm seeing "ma'am" everywhere I look, and it's darned difficult to find any mention of "ma'm" at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trumaine7

Can you put "ma'am" at the beginning of the sentence and be right? If yes it was wrong for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

The sentence would be fine with "ma'am" at the beginning, but the translation would not be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trumaine7

Alright well I'll try not and do that then if it's not 100% right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bdjbm8LK

I thought "ma'am" was the English abbreviation of "madam"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morena157604

Once again my correct answer was shown to be incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

There is no point in saying that here, because we don't know what your answer was. If, however, you copy and paste your exact answer here, then we can either tell you if there is a mistake somewhere, or if you should report during the lesson that your answer should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judy170123

Why not cost? The skirt cost ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

It's the wrong tense.

  • Present tense: the skirt costs (la falda cuesta)
  • Past tense: the skirt cost (la falda costó)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanWilli838712

Why was madam not accepted rather than ma'am


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/En.Fugl

Susan, I have used madam in place of ma'am and had it be correct. Next time be sure to report it if there is an issue. Also, if you copy your sentence in the discussion folks can help you identify any other errors that may be in the sentence which could actually be the reason for the error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roberto891259

If you're speaking English you're smarter to say miss.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sassfb

Why would that be? Where I live (North Carolina), "ma'am" is very respectful and is used to address any woman.

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