"El señor quiere probarse aquellos zapatos."

Translation:The gentleman wants to try on those shoes.

June 18, 2018

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kelseydwf

What is the difference between "aquellos" and "esos"?

January 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Ese generally means that the object is close to the listener, and aquel that it is out of reach for both speaker and listener. "Those shoes there", basically.

January 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelseydwf

Thank you!

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Nesrine535955

Why probarse?

June 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielDiAn5

If one says "...quiere probar esos zapatos" they would understand you anyway. But then that way it could mean the man wants to TASTE those shoes... :)

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/wordwing

07/17/18. Reflexive verb and, because one is using here an infinitive reflexive verb, this form (with the reflexive pronoun tacked on to the end of the verb) is mandatory. See www.fluentu.com/blog/spanish/spanish-reflexive-verbs.

July 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4

What about El señor se quiere probar aquellos zapatos?

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Sure, that works as well.

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/pat165362

I figured out that ponerse is to wear and probarse is to try on. Thanks.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness

I was confused over "try on" and "wear" or "put on", thinking they were the same word. Thanks.

April 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/yair139805

Why "probarse" and not "probar"?

March 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Probarse is usually used if you're trying on clothes. Probar mostly refers to trying food and drinks.

March 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DiamondJoyce

I've heard "señor" can be translated "lord". Can someone tell me if that would be acceptable in this sentence?

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Señor can be translated as "lord" in the sense of "a man who rules over something". If you mean the specific title for a British nobleman or member of Parliament, which would be the likelier interpretation if you start with "The lord wants ...", it would also just be called lord in Spanish.

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DiamondJoyce

I guess I was thinking of the Bible, where I've seen "LORD" translated as "Señor" and "lord" translated as "señor." In the latter case it wouldn't refer to a nobleman, but still a title of sorts.

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4

DiamondJoyce, I believe in Duoland señor is used either for the title "Mr." or the word "gentleman." It's Duo's signal to use a third person singular verb (quiere) and pronoun (usted or se), if a pronoun is needed.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/timthetoothman

I actually just tried it, and Duo did not accept “The Lord.” But I tried it earlier, and it accepted “The Lord wants paper to write a note.”

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

And now I have to imagine a disgruntled god trying to do mundane stuff for each sentence with "el señor" in it. :´D

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Shannon419352

According to Duo, there seems to be a very significant difference between 'wants to' and 'would like to'. Can anyone help me figure out what the deal is? Maybe it's a regional thing, but where I'm from they mean the same thing.

March 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

"Would like to" is usually just more polite that "to want to", but there's no difference in meaning. "To want" is usually translated as querer, and "would like" as gustaría or quisiera.

March 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jkks9r1l

again the word to try on - WAS MISSING FROM THE OPTIONS. SOMEONE FROM DUOLINGO NEEDS TO THOROUGHLY REVIEW THE ANSWERS

May 23, 2019
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