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  5. "Sie haben Hemden."

"Sie haben Hemden."

Translation:They have shirts.

March 26, 2013

128 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stapmoshun

How do you know if Sie is They or She?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stefan.kar

You know that by the form of the verb. It is haben or hat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dstiv

But you don't know if the sentence means "you have shirts" or "they have shirts."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gannon85

Exactly, I am confused as well. Sie haben Hemden could mean either 'they' or '(f.) you'. Since 'Sie' begins the sentence could it not be 'they' disguised by the capitalization? If you look at the verb it would be 'hat' if 'Sie' was 'she', but it's clearly not, so how do you distinguish between 'you' and 'they'? Is this simply based on context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akabara13

The only way to know is to see how the verb is conjugated if it was sie (singular) the verb would be: Sie hat Hemden. Haben (to have) is irregular The conjugation for haben is Ich habe Du hast sie/er/es hat Wir haben Ihr habt Sie haben (Sie meaning they) The case of most verbs (regular) the conjugation goes: Gehen for example Ich gehe (ends with a e) Du gehst (ends with st) sie/er/es geht (ends with t) Wir gehen (is the full verb or the infinitive) Ihr geht (ends with t) Sie gehen (Sie that means they also takes the infinitive) Hope that helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonFuchs1

Oh Boy now I'm really confused? Anyone agree with me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crxz6

Context clues in conversation. Otherwise, either works as the answer here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekSimms

I, in the past, have had this conversation with my German relatives and I came to understand that there is no way you would know. The only way you would know which was meant is by the conversation you would be having, the subject of which, I'm assuming, would be understood by all parties involved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlaaGem

"Sie haben" could mean the both " you (all) have" and "they have". If i'm mistaken someone correct me please !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eduardoRH9

It could be also you (in singular way) have. Remember Sie is used for singular an plural in a formal way. Here, with this example it will depend completely on the context so that you can understand the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/longname

Yes, I got both forms in the exercise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

No. “Sie haben X” is either “they have X”, or “you (formal) have X.”

“She has X” ==> Sie hat X.


[deactivated user]

    "you (all) have" would be ihr not sie. Sie means either she or they. I know your post is 6 years old, but...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewNeitz

    I believe you just have to listen to what they are sqying and the verb form


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pandanime

    i accidentaly wrote they have sh*ts ,corrected it though


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nabelsa

    Sie > they sie > she That's my thought


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carson47007

    Sorry never mind


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VanessaJ101

    I was also confused by this problem for a long time, until I realised that Germans sometimes have the same problem:

    In a film I watched, a bank manager is woken in the middle of the night by knocking at his door. He opens it to find policemen standing outside. "Sie haben die Bank ausgeraubt" says one of them.

    The bank manager, confused and shocked, responds "Wer? Ich?!"

    "Nein" answers the policeman. "Drei Männer, sie haben die Bank ausgeraubt."...

    After that, I felt better about being confused sometimes :-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eman413709

    we know from the next verb after Sie


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Handrisuselo

    According to the conjugated verb.

    Sie hat ... = She has ...

    Sie haben = They/you (formal) have ...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaKole4

    You look at the verb


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lars-keSmi

    That does not help if Sie is a formal you. Both use the same verb form.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    True. In that case, IRL you have to depend on the context: are you talking to a person, or about several people?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manish831293

    When 'sie ist' is there it is she and when 'sie sind' is there it is they.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dadda131

    "Sie haben" =they have. "Sie hat" =She has


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobPicke1

    Trial and error, my friend. If i can suggest.. Look up a table for verb endings and draw it. Sie werden lernen. I hope i was right. Time to use google translate. I still get confused.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AseemKumar

    Skirt is masculine but Shirt is neuter....Funny!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryGreenw

    Das Kleid is a dress Der Rock is a skirt


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astronaut_Eule

    That one was very hard to understand. I hear "Sie haben handegum".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Szimmetria

    I hear "Sie haben Hmmhmm" every time i play it -.-


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen898348

    I hear "Sie haben hem"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skaliton

    right even trying to hear the 'dem' I can swear it isn't there


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Columbus86

    Yes, i wish they would get rid of the robot already.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamilaDurdyn

    I checked the pronounciation and Duo's is correct.

    http://pt.forvo.com/search/Hemden/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kleineule

    I agree. This does not sound like how my German teacher pronounces it, she is much clearer with the vowels. (She is a native speaker btw.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tams505329

    I listened repeatedly and only heard 'hem' every time. Is the Den part silent?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cadence515941

    The audio is really bad. 'Hemden' sounds like 'Hemd'. The speakers need to properly enunciate their words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    There are no human speakers. It’s all text-to-speech software.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skellygirl98

    I wrote she has shirts And got it wrong So if it has have said sie hat hemden i would have. Been correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethan.murdoch

    Correct - "she has shirts" translates to "sie hat hemden".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhalilGdou

    This man's pronunciation is really confusing, he says "hem" instead of "hemden" , and this is just an example. Normal?!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    It’s a computer. The voice actually does say Hemden, though, but the last syllable is less strongly pronounced, more like /hemdn/. It’s not two clearly separated syllables like ‘hem-den’, if that was what you were expecting to hear.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ah216

    even at slow speed I am hearing singular word for "Hemd".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrigo_ah

    Can, "Sie haben Hemden" also be, "You have shirts"? The program seems to say so.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hohenems

    Yes. "Sie" = formal you, (singular or plural) conjugated just like "sie" (they).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/umlaut.astronaut

    I still didnt get why "Sie ___en" is "he" sometimes :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chupipe

    The thing is that for native English speakers it is a little bit hard to focus on the conjugation of the verb, since in English the only difference would be the 's' for the third person. For us, as native Spanish speakers, it's easier since we have more conjugations. So, tip: when in doubt, check the verb. If you already know which verb it's being used, take a quick look at Wordreference or a similar website that gives you the chance to conjugate verbs. Although Duolingo let you see the conjugation when hovering over verbs.

    Well, these are my 2 cents. Good luck!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hohenems

    It shouldn't be. "Sie ____en" is either "they" or "you" (formal, singular or plural).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stuart351814

    Why does Duo out of no where start using the "they" of sie?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

    Sie can mean formal you, she or they.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nique251340

    On mine it said you have shirts instead of they have shirts


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diiasy

    Why Sie haben Hemd is not possible ? If it's you the person can have only one shirt And if it's they the group can also have only one shirt


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    No... I have lots of shirts in my wardrobe. I'm sure you do,too. Haben here means 'possess', not 'wear'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stefaniebaxter

    Because "they have shirt" doesn't make sense without an article. You could say they have A shirt or they have THE shirt, which would be "Sie haben ein Hemd" or "Sie haben das Hemd." (Ein/das because it is neuter).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lexx28312

    I thought, plural "You" is "Ihr", and "They" or "She" are "Sie"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThePlea

    "Sie" is also formal form for "You". It goes with "-en".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjministro

    Can one use the verb 'haben' with the same meaning of 'tragen'? I.e., can "Sie haben Hemden" both mean that they have shirts or that they are wearing shirts? Thanks


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/15tcsomysona

    if Sie means she then how does Sie mean you


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thebreadwinners

    It can be formal and depend on the endings


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardCor912224

    Sie is a homonym - and annoying since all 3 "sie's" are pronouns (sie/she, Sie/you(formal), sie/they). But it's like bear (the animal) and bear (the verb (to carry/support)). You have to look at the words around it to know which they want.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AshleyHunt13

    So Sie could mean you, she, and they?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanMorten4

    No, notice the effect of capitalization.

    "sie" can mean she and they. "Sie" at the start of a sentence can mean 'she', 'they', or 'you'. "Sie" somewhere other than the start of a sentence can only mean 'you'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/111DBrown111

    What does you formal mean and when does it get used?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CamilaDurdyn

    Can someone explain how exactly this word is pronounced?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qbasicmichael

    Which word? I think "Sie" is pronounced like "Zee". I think the rest are pronounced like they're spelled, but I might be wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanMorten4

    It is pronounced exactly like the letter 'Z' in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlliRose3

    Oh my goodness I didn't wveb realize these cimments where here for help. This app just became even more incredible.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caitjem03

    you cannot understand the last word - i thought it said kinder


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPolis

    In regular speed: "Wir haben Hemden". In slow speed: "Sie haben Hemden"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ATMunn

    When the automated voice pronounced this, the "en" at the end of "Hemden" is kinda hard to hear. The first time it came up I got it wrong because I heard "Hemd" instead of "Hemden."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catasprache

    It's extremely hard to tell the difference between 'Hemd' and 'Hemden'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

    In the way that the audio sounds. The ending -en can hardly be heard.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Being3arabi

    du and ihr is you not sie I think there was a mistake


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kylehwuzhere

    "sie" can be a formal "you"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pyrcillia

    They have shirts or Sie haben Hemden. Can be confusing. Sie "They" or Sie "She depend on the ending of such words like "Haben" To have "Hast" Has .

    It can also be "Du hast" You have, " Ihr habt" Y'all have or You've, "Ich habe" I have.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amiloo

    So how do you tell if its 'you have' or 'they have' in this case? I really thought it was 'they have shirts' 'You' wasnt at all in my mind, I expected a 'Du'???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osafo1

    Why does the male voice pronounce "Hemden" different from the female voice?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaukedeJon1

    'you' in this sentence is the 'royal' form right? Which has the same verb as 'they' so why is they wrong? There is no way to tell


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anna704016

    I think duo made mistake here - 'Sie' could mean formal 'you' but the app itself translates it as 'they' (when you click on Sie). Grammatically their translation is correct but as a system there's mistaken. Sie shall be given 'you' as an option when you tapp on translation and it shall accept 'they".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomer.ginzburg

    why is the plural of hemd is hemden?das hemd is neuter, and also a one syllable noun, so shouldn't it be die hemde?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    No. That has nothing to do with it, unfortunately. There are five different plural forms, and one just has to learn them. That is, das Buch is neuter, and also a one-syllable noun, yet the plural of das Buch is die Bücher. And the plural of das Pferd is die Pferde. So, there’s no way to predict which plural form a noun will take.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KINGJONES

    Does German use "en" as English uses "es"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanMorten4

    Technically, "You have shirts" should also be an accepted answer since 'Sie' starts the sentence (and thus is capitalized no matter what), and there is no context between "you" and "they".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsabelArre4

    Just for prnunciation sake, can anyone confirm that the den of hemden is always so understated?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    Yes. It’s an unstressed syllable, just like the last syllable of the English words “lemon”, “written”, or “sofa”. They don’t say “hem-DEN”, any more than we say “lem-ON” or “writ-TEN”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FouadHabib1

    It's telling me that the correct answer is you have shirts. My answer was The have shirts. I forgot the "y" in they which the app usually picks up on.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLee793416

    ill give you double the lingots you give me


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JrgenStein5

    Typo, but treated as mistake... Ugh


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanguageMa453868

    Again with the missing dot (.) Only reason you get the wrong answer is because the dot is missing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyIskan1

    I wrote the right answer and it was considered incorrect


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Magdalena460649

    Why there is no "die" before the noun?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    Because they are not specific shirts, just shirts in general.

    “There’s a nice souvenir shop on Main Street. We should check them out. They have shirts.”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atharv298632

    I am atharv i like dyolingo much


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thebreadwinners

    I said 2 out of 3 words anf they said i was correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma27272727

    I said it but it didn't count


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/111DBrown111

    And why is you the answer but not an option?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edrika

    why is the plural of Hemd, Hemden; if the plural of Hund is Humde; Fisch, Fische, Tier. Tiere ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jotomicron

    Plurals are not always formed the same way. See for instance "Ei", which becomes "Eier"; "Erdebeere" becomes "Erdebeeren". Sometimes the word doesn't even change: "das Mädchen", "die Mädchen".

    See http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/pluralnouns.htm


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edrika

    Danke, Das ist nützlich


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/black_spring

    I also would like to ask, as a neuter noun, why is Hemd receiving a feminine "-en" suffix for pluralization? Wouldn't Hemde (as previously posted) or even Hemder be more appropriate for neuters?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

    Logically yes however German is apparently not very logical.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedH5

    What is the singular of Hemden ??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monkey7934

    How do you know what pkural to use? Whether it be -en or -e


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    You don’t. There are five different plural forms, and one just has to learn which one is correct for a specific noun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cubbance

    The robot voice sucks. It sounds like "Hennigan". I played it over and over, and it never sounded like anything else.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SupEvan

    Try heading over to forvo.com and search for german words there, they usually have natives pronouncing the words!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmaya3

    Could also be "you"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anukhanijo

    Then how do I distinguish Sie .......en is they or you. Please help.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heavengaze

    Only by context. Without it both answers are correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chilari

    I typoed on this but because shorts are also clothing, it marked as wrong instead of a typo. I gotta check before hitting enter.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phosporousman7

    How do you pronounce "Hemden"? From what I can tell, the "d" is silent.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KealaniSmith

    The "d" isn't silent. Hemd is pronounced Hem-dt. German "d" often sounds like "dt" or "t".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phosporousman7

    Thanks! The more I've studied German, the more I realized it wasn't


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alikgr

    Sie means they,not you


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sassy113

    Actually Sie can mean you formal as well


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

    It does mean ‘you’ (formal). Sie haben Pferde. = ‘You (formal) have horses.’
    sie haben Pferde. = ‘they have horses’. sie hat Pferde. = ‘she has horses.’

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