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  5. "El jefe tiene dos secretaria…

"El jefe tiene dos secretarias."

Translation:The boss has two secretaries.

June 19, 2018

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SqueaksLoves

...I think that this Boss might be a ''little'' lazy...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jyo882099

Its better than having 2 wives though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JrodCanuck

El jefe es muy importante!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PQ4hU1MM

It's just a language lesson, not a social commentary against women.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaireNguy19

Is it also "secretaria", even if the secretary is male? Duolingo has most occupation words being sometimes masculine and sometimes feminine--el jefe and la jefa, el maestro and la maestra, el médico and la médica, and so forth--but they seem to only ever have la secretaria. Would you call a male secretary un secretario?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The masculine form is "el secretario".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/julius443137

Some proffesions change, Judge el juez la jueza Lawyer el abogado la abogada Teacher el profesor la profesora Secretary el secretario la secretaria Waiter camarero camarera

But others don't change

Police el policía la policía Agent el agente la agente Taxi driver el taxista la taxista Soldier el soldado la soldado...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesJudd

I agree marked incorrect because of masculine use


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gtandes

Rich boss = secretary youjizz style


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaDigonal

Spanish people always have two secretaries


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eileen_ruth

Why does this never use the masculine form of secertary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Eileen, apparently nobody in this course has a male secretary. :´)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wendy373222

In the German-Spanish course, the male form was used quite often! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Francoise876798

Who has two secretaries? I'm wondering if Spanish speaking countries are a lot more hierarchical than New Zealand where I live. Interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

The faculty of the university I'm at does have two secretaries, because there are a lot of students to cater to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1031002687

Must be handsome boss.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaDigonal

How many languages do you guys learn ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Currently, more or less actively, four: Danish, Spanish, Hungarian and Armenian. I'm having a hard time not picking up more at the moment. :´)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

I find the letters super cute.

Իմ ընկերոջ սենյակը շատ մեծ է: - My friend's room is very big.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim46

No way I can distinguish jefe in this audio?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeAllen835492

I just spelled secretaries incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacqueline984399

I find that so annoying as sometimes they say you have a typo error but other times they don't!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

A typo is only allowed if it does not make another word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pj1001

I used jefa instead of jefe and it was marked wrong. Isn't jefa the feminine of boss? This seems a little biased.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

2018-10-18 As Ryagon stated, La jefa should be acceptable. But if you put El jefa, that mixes genders, so would be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

If your task was to translate from English to Spanish, then yes, "La jefa" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaDigonal

Is there a feminine word for boss in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"La jefa" is popular for that. In some cases, like for a female chief of police, you can also find "la jefe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony510093

Secretary's was not accepted, why ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Tony, whenever you have " 's" attached to a noun, it's a possessive form. So you can say something like "the secretary's wife". If you want to form a plural in English, you'll mostly just add the letter 's' at the end, without an apostrophe. In the case of "secretary", which ends with a vowel 'y', that 'y' will also turn into 'ie' when you pluralise it:

  • one secretary - two secretaries

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samstar323

I think its frustrating that im a terrible speller in English so i always get them wrong just because i cant spell it right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janine2829

I can't quite work out how he is pronouncing jefe, it sound's like hes saying fefe but should it be pronounced hefe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That is not an f sound. It might be the sound from the back of the throat that you hear in Scottish "loch".

https://www.thoughtco.com/pronouncing-the-spanish-g-and-j-3079543


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacqueline984399

It was correct just spelt seretaries wrong by one letter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Oh, "spelt" is another British form. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/spelt I was used to it being the grain. Duolingo usually allows a typo if it doesn't make another word, but it would be wrong if Duolingo was expecting you to write in Spanish, so double check Duolingo's instructions for that particular exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carol4ME

Why cannot the boss be a woman? Jefa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"La jefa tiene dos secretarios." is also correct when translating from English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/young_rishabh

El jefe esta divertido


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The verb is "está" and "esta" = "this" for a noun that happens to be feminine in Spanish, so pay attention to the accent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue471461

Isn't having two secretaries as dangerous as having two wives?

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