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  5. "¿Puede traer más pollo frito…

"¿Puede traer más pollo frito?"

Translation:Can you bring more fried chicken?

June 19, 2018

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul862466

Kentucky's pollo frito


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristinChile

Pollo frito de Kentucky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dustin296362

What would be the difference in meanining between Puede traer.... and Puedes traer....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krayon96

Puede traer= "can you (formal) bring" or "can he/she/it bring" Puedes = "can you (informal) bring".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XCkKnAWb

If using puede traer in the formal why don't we need to say "puede usted"? 4/20


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

Because, in the context where this would be said, the speaker is making a request to a specific person. Conceivably, yes, this could be translated with "he" or "she", and Duo should accept both of those, too.
Timor mortis conturbat me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8ndRNs5H

Why doesn't it have el pollo? I'm having trouble knowing when to use the articles before nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

I'd say the "mas" must stand in for an article. "more chicken"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moondaughter0

Why isnt traer conjugated? For example 'puede trae' or 'puedes traes'?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Verbs following verbs occur as infinitives and are never conjugated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackyPower

Because poder is conjugated, you don't have 2 conjugated words together


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gurrlplease

When do I use "can you bring" as opposed to "could you bring"? The drop down had both, but I typed 'could you' and it was marked wrong. ¿Por qué?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doublelingot

That is another tense.

Sandra, could you bring the wine? Sandra, ¿podrías traer el vino? Marja, could you bring us dessert now? Marja, ¿podrías traer el postre ahora?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlisonCarl6

Why can't this be Can he (or she) bring more fried chicken?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sparrowtree

This is driving me crazy. At first duolingo says the answer is "can you bring me some more fried chicken" and then later it says it is "can you bring me more fried chicken". Why can't either be right since now no matter how I answer, it's wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spiceyokooko

The literal translation for that is:

Puede - You can (usted)

traer (infinitive form) to bring

más - more

pollo - chicken

frito - fried

You can to bring more chicken fried - is a very strange sentence construction in English so it needs to be rearranged:

It's a question, so 'Can' goes at the front and you can leave out the 'to' because it's not needed:

Can you bring more fried chicken?

You'll notice there's no 'me' or 'some' in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraMon385640

Excellent explanation! 5 lingots for you! (I've got a bunch of them and nothing to spend them on....)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0036302532462

Great explanation, but I was just curious if the sentence means the chicken should be more fried or more quantity of the fried chicken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxGonzale16

It's asking for more chicken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arlene971651

Vey helpful! Couldn't figure out the derivatio of puede traer. Thanks spicey!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

Great comment, Spice. Very nice!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MitchellSm885878

Could also be translated as 'Could he/she bring more fried chicken?'. A legitimate question in my circle when someone is arriving late and we are low on nourishment. Duo dont like it though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LynneWebb1

Shouldn't it be puedes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

Only if you know the person who's serving you. Otherwise, it's best to use the formal 'you'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheryliON

Is it not correct to also say "Will you bring more fried chicken?" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HappyAvocado

Duolingo said that when asking someone to do something, you just say "Traes mas pollo?". Im confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kim_Yunho

Can you bring more chicken fry? Chicken fry => Marked wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nele.Ra

frito is an adjective meaning fried. In English you wouldn't say "chicken fry" because the chicken has already been fried, so it becomes past tense. Furthermore it is now used as an adjective so it's before the noun, not after like in Spanish.

English: fried chicken Spanish: pollo frito


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PFA3579

chicken must have "s"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

No, because "fried chicken" is a dish. We never talk about the individual chickens that were used to make it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frankenstein1818

i just wanted to say I needed this one, thank you Duo. :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul167952

Whats wrong with this???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

Not a thing! Everybody wants more fried chicken!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/merifti

how can we notice more " fried chicken" or "chiken that fried more", gramatically ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

If you want your chicken cooked more you don't say 'more fried'. You might say, 'Can you fry this chicken a little more?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dawnie_123

My speech recognition function put puedes instead of puede. So I left it, because it seems like a legitimate sentence to me, but Duo wasn't having any of that! Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

I would have thought it should have been accepted. Are you sure there wasn't another error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dawnie_123

I checked my answer letter for letter. I didn't put in the question marks. But I've never got marked down for omitting punctuation before. Anyway, we shall see, I've reported it.

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