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"It's always cloudy in February."

Translation:Siempre está nublado en febrero.

June 20, 2018

53 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keithwelch

I'm confused. Every other example in this lesson has taken the form "hace _" to talk about the weather. Why did it suddenly shift to "está ___"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrchidOverstone

Duolingo's tip section mentions the options that can use "hace," but not all weather conditions can be used with "hace." "Hace nubes" is not a Spanish expression. Any weather condition can be phrased this way (i.e. "hace sol" or "está soleado"), but this is one that must be phrased this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon158589

None of the tips have ever shown anything but hace. How are we to know the exception if duo does not teach it in the tips?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anu180459

For ser versus estar, it is more helpful to think about if it is about a characteristic or state. It is more practical than permanent or temporary.

Here for example, weather is a state, not a characteristic, so estar is appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob616981

I clearly don't understand when to use Ser vs. Estar when describing the weather. Duo seems to be very inconsistent. In this sentence the condition is "always", so I would think ser would be appropriate. In another example, Duo seems to contradict itself. The comments below are NOT helpful and do not clarify why ser or estar would be used in a given situation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark304498

In Spanish weather discussions, you will use forms of "Estar" and "Hacer", but generally not "Ser". "Estar" is usually used with an adjective. In this sentence "nublado" is an adjective meaning cloudy, so "Está nublado" means that it is cloudy. Whether it is always, sometimes, or rarely cloudy, this is the form that is used.

"Hacer" is usually used with nouns. So "Hace sol" or "Hace calor" means that it it sunny or hot. Both sol and calor are nouns. If you wanted to use the adjective for "sunny", which is soleado, the sentence would become "Está soleado." Just another way to say "It is sunny".

It is a confusing topic, but Ser vs. Estar is generally not the issue. Está vs. Hace vs. Hay is the trick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LangKerry

Hace frio; hace calor - I don't see why it's not "Hace nublado" in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark304498

As discussed immediately above your comment: Frio and Calor are nouns, and a form of Hacer is generally used with nouns. Nublado is an adjective, and a form of Estar is generally used with adjectives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WesDavis5

how are hot and cold nouns??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark304498

Spanish is different than English in many ways. Calor is a masculine noun, and is used in some types of sentences. To say "I am hot" would be "Tengo calor", literally, I have heat. There are Spanish adjectives for hot, including caliente and caluroso that are used in other circumstances.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wkenders

I see patience is one of your good qualities. If you are not a teacher, you should be


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hamish124279

Very helpful, thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wkenders

Excellent explanation, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hombre_de_Poder

Can this sentence lead off with "Está" rather than "Siempre"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShellyHend1

I thought it said you don't need to use está, just "nublado" I put "Siempre nublado en febrero" Why do you have to use it sometimes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

What you have written says "always cloudy in February". You need "está", or the sentence has no "is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArifJonata

Why not "Siempre hace nublado en Febrero"? I though we use "hace" for weather?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrchidOverstone

Only for certain kinds of weather conditions, frankly. Cloudy is not one of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon158589

That is exactly what I wrote. Look above at Mark's explanation to Bob. He explains it excellently!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tcclimber

Could this also be "hay" since it's stating a fact?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TykaBooker

Hay=there is/there are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShYe13

Technically, if it's ALWAYS cloudy in February, then that is a permanent state, and we should be using "ser" not "estar." El nino esta enfermo. El nino es guapo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark304498

Ser vs Estar is much more complex than permanent vs. temporary. For instance, when describing the location of something, estar is used. Even something permanent like a mountain or an ocean. Estar is used when talking about the condition of something/someone. In Spanish, being dead is a condition, and to say "He is dead" is "Él está muerto".

The longer you hang onto the idea of permanent vs. temporary, the longer you will be confused with Ser vs. Estar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TSG45

Why is "nublado" feminine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippoposthumous

It isn't.

Nublado is an adjective meaning cloudy. It changes depending on the noun. La agua nublada = cloudy water. It's nublado here, because it modifies an implicit "el tiempo" (the weather) which is masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stuart506453

How do we assume its the present to esta when talking about February


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippoposthumous

Because that is what's called the "present progressive tense". Here's a description of how it works in Spanish:

https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/presprog


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MARIECARNA

Why is it está nublado and not hace? Its been hace all along to describe the weather and then it changes to está? Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sarah682501

If duolingo wants to change horses in midstream, they should give an explation or hint. Instead, just as I begin to feel confident, they start checking it wrong. Then there is this long period of just guessing what they want until you can get out of that session. NOT helpful at all. I got through it, without a CLUE as to what is right or wrong. NOTE TO SELF: Avoid discussing the weather at all costs. Just MOVE ON!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlakeTyson2

I'm just here to say this weather sections is bonkers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kRrJNoWI

Christmas is always in december. Permanent or not? If it is permanent, then cloudiness is permanent in february, because we are told it is. February is always after january. Esta or es?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark304498

Ser vs Estar is much more complex than permanent vs. temporary. For instance, when describing the location of something, estar is used. Even something permanent like a mountain or an ocean. Estar is used when talking about the condition of something/someone. In Spanish, being dead is a condition, and to say "He is dead" is "Él está muerto".

The longer you hang onto the idea of permanent vs. temporary, the longer you will be confused with Ser vs. Estar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elana242693

VERY confused about use of esta and hace referring to weather. How do we know which to use?

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