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  5. "La secretaria necesita ayuda…

"La secretaria necesita ayuda con el trabajo."

Translation:The secretary needs help with the work.

June 20, 2018

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marxyung

somebody tell me why sometime nneed (to)? sometime without" to"? im very compuse....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

(Verb) "to help" = "ayudar"

"...needs help..." = "...necesita ayuda" (Here "help" is a noun.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanOcansey

Shouldn't "the secretary needs help with the work." also be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

Sean, that's Duo's answer, I think (at the top of this page). Perhaps you had a typo on the answer page, but not in your post. That sometimes happens when you retype your answer into your post instead of copying and pasting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanOcansey

Haha yeah I meant to put the answer I actually said. I can't even remember it anymore


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanOcansey

No Haha I didn't explain myself well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

You have deleted some of what I originally read. You mentioned that you put "the work" instead of "her job" and the second would have been wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanOcansey

Shoudn't "the secretary needs help with the work." also be accepted? Because that's what I put and it was wrong....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That is not wrong, unless you were supposed to put it in Spanish. Many different exercises come to this page for this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JensMadsen1

I wonder why job in wrong in translation of trabajo in 1 situation, but work is correct in the next?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

When you say "el trabajo" that can be either "the job" or "the work", when you say "un trabajo" that means "a job" because we don't say "a work" (I am not counting "a work of art" as that is translated to a different Spanish word.). We just say "work" like we say "water" as if it were uncountable. Then, you have to be careful, because "trabajo" is also the verb form for "yo", just as you can say "I work" which is also a verb. "Job" is only a noun and never a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fragout316

I noticed that the verb changed to a masculine version after "con/with". Im unsure of why..can anyone offer some insight?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nEjh0qr4

fragout, isn't it because el trabajo is a noun ("the work"), not a verb form? The verb trabajar changes endings as it's conjugated, but the noun doesn't change.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louise480083

Where dies it say "some" help with the job?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louise480083

Where does it say the secretary needs "some" help with the work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is not necessarily "her work" which would have been "su trabajo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mnorman6

Is 'el' feminine in this instace?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, the noun "trabajo", like most nouns that end in o, is masculine in Spanish. Every noun is either masculine or feminine and often the article is a clue as to its gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkJenner5

Why couldnt it be "her work" instead of "the work"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

el trabajo = the work

su trabajo = his or her or their or your work (for usted or ustedes)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WYATTWESTW

In this case, it can mean work, or, job. I put "work/job". Both are covered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, you need to put one or the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/My-name-is-Bella

Exactly what I thought


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duckeh101

Why is it trabaj"o" and not trabaj"a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is not a verb here. The noun "el trabajo" = "the work" or "the job".

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