"¿Adónde vamos a viajar?"

Translation:Where are we going to travel to?

5 months ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stine977098

In English the addition of "to" at the end is unnecessary, especially in UK...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tropicalnut
tropicalnut
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 1723

especially in English anywhere

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ndreon

I think the best translation is "Where are we going to travel?" That question, like the Spanish version can be answered with an area where traveling will occur or a destination as follows. "We are going to travel in Europe." or "We are going to travel to Europe."

I think the English with the final "to" is requesting the name of a destination and not allowing for an area of travel so it is not a good translation of the Spanish question.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wordwing

08/01/18. I posted alternate correct answer 07/11/18 below and Duolingo promptly today added suggestion to accepted answers. Way to go Duolingo for being so responsive!

"Hi wordwing, You suggested 'Where are we going to travel' as a translation for '¿Adónde vamos a viajar?' We now accept this translation. :) Thanks for the contribution, please keep it up! - Duolingo"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anita791220

It didn't accept "To where are we going to travel?" and I think that is a better answer than ending the sentence with a "to"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth577216

Your answer is grammatically correct, and the duo answer is not. Ending a sentence with a preposition is poor English.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstabanPay

I was just told my answer is wrong when leaving off the final "to". :-(

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SAPratt
SAPratt
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 3
  • 222

Still not accepting this on 7 August

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wordwing

08/07/18. When DL informed me that they had made this correction (as noted in my 08/01/18 post above), I thought this issue was dead and there was no reason to keep beating this horse. Apparently, and to paraphrase Mark Twain, news of this horse's death is "greatly exaggerated." Let the posting continue!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boh422
Boh422
  • 25
  • 146

8/20 - Reported yet again.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe2455

I believe it was also Twain who said; "ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put"

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wordwing

07/29/18. [Comment is in response to ndreon's original post (now replaced 07/30/18), in which ndreon gave two plausible reasons (quoted and discussed below) why the preposition "to" could not be omitted from end of DL's English translation above without changing the question's meaning. Though ndreon has withdrawn his position, the pros and cons of that position continue to be relevant to this discussion string.]

Respectfully, ndreon, your position is well presented and raises new subtle distinctions between "where" and where...to." But in my view and for the following reasons, it is on balance ultimately unpersuasive because the actual question for this exercise raised above and commented on further below is:

May one leave "to" off the end of the DL exemplar English translation ("Where are we going to travel to?”) and still have an ADDITIONAL acceptable response that is both consistent with standard English usage and materially the same substantively? (Not whether one response is accurate and acceptable to the exclusion of the other.)

As to your first point, "the [']to['] at the end changes the meaning to match the Spanish," here I think you are drawing a distinction between the use of "adónde" vs. "dónde." But these two words can be used interchangeably to mean "where" or "where to," except: "¿adónde?... is optionally used with verbs of motion [and] [o]nly ¿dónde? can be used when no motion is involved." Butt, John and Carmen Benjamin, A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish, § 24.9 (Dónde 'where'), p. 359 (4th ed. 2004); see also forum.duolingo.com/comment/11893/Adónde-contra-Dónde [accord]. Thus, at least for this specific exercise sentence where "motion is involved," the distinction you suggest is one without a difference.

As to your second point, you also note that "[w]ith the final 'to' it is explicitly asking where is our [singular] destination." But adding "to" does not expressly or by reasonable implication limit the question to a single destination (whether an initial, final, main, or other destination). Both questions contemplate that "we" in the future will be traveling "to" at least one or more destinations, but neither form of the question restricts the number of destinations solicited in the response. As such, placing "to" at the end adds nothing substantively to the question. It is in effect an empty preposition in this context.

In short, both options should be counted as acceptable. But if one did have to choose between these two options, I think most college educated English speakers would likely drop "to" from the the end of the question, not only because it adds and clarifies nothing, but also because it would sound to the ears of some native English speakers at least slightly more awkward.

I suspect that the battle between the sentence-ending-preposition opponents and advocates will rage on here and elsewhere:

Q. Where is it at? A. Before the the "a" and the "t."

Q. Where is it at? A. One does not end a sentence with a preposition. Q. Ok, where is it at, ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤. :-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ndreon

oops, my browser didn't display your response until after I changed my comment to better reflect my thinking on the subject. This alters the context of your very interesting response, sorry about that.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jim_Toomey

In English, it's simply poor grammar to end a sentence with a preposition (to).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MalcolmQuino

More than unnecessary it's actually grammatically incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gordon563001

English is a Germanic language, and for these languages, ending sentences with prepositions is perfectly natural (think: separable prefixes in German). It is only “grammatically uncorrect” in the minds of snobbish pedants who labor under the delusion that English is - or is pretending to be - a Romance language.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe2455

Do you mean incorrect, what is "un correct"? I guess I'm just a romantic.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe2455

It is simply grammatically incorrect, especially in the US

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

To where are we going to travel? Sounds weird, huh? Still not as bad as, "Where are we going to travel to?"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gordon563001

Why not just "Where are we going to travel?"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wordwing

07/11/18. Agree that "Where are we going to travel?" is the clearest, simplest, and most natural translation. It also avoids having a preposition at the end of the sentence ('stranded preposition'), which though many authorities now find somewhat acceptable under certain circumstances, others still caution against as incorrect.

Notably, Winston Churchill is famously quoted poking fun at the strict grammarians of the latter camp:

"A preposition is a terrible thing to end a sentence with.”

"This is the sort of English up with which I will not put."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
  • 25
  • 22
  • 384

I agree, Gordon!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 695

It rejected "where are we going to travel" for me too. Reported 3 July 2018.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

We are victims of common bad usage. DL sometimes falls into such traps. It always bugs when they accept such but throw the penalty flag on perfectly acceptable alternatives.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pedro.Ronaldo

Absolutely!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
  • 25
  • 6
  • 3
  • 150

If only everyone still spoke correctly! Whither are you going guys?!!! Spanish correctly still makes the distinction between where is it? (donde) and to where ie whither are you going? (adonde). So you will all be ready to translate dedonde when it turns up as whence I trust!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelSears

To where are we going to travel? This is grammatically correct.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kveebee

If I said in Spanish, "Dónde vamos a viajar?" would I be incorrect?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25

Yes, I also want to know the difference between dónde and adónde, both being translated as =where..

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tropicalnut
tropicalnut
  • 25
  • 22
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 1723

I am not certain, but I think adónde means ''where to'' . That is where the annoying ''to'' comes from at the end of this sentence.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

That is the literal translation (which I use to help me remember). But here is what DL says:

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/es/Vacation/tips

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Georgeloui765237

It rejected Where are going to travel on July 10,2018.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/halber111

I agree with Gordon 563...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JCKeasler

agreed.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gordon563001

Actually, that rule about not ending sentences with prepositions was ill-conceived, as a snobbish attempt to emulate the “classics” (Greek and Latin) which, by their very nature, do not do that sort of thing. But English is a GERMANIC language, not a Romance language; and German is full of verbs with separable prefixes. These prefixes are most often PREPOSITIONS; and when they are separated they move to the END of the sentence (or clause). So it is FAR more natural in English to say “That is something I won’t put up with” than to say “That is something up with which I will not put.”

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dosoon79
Dosoon79
  • 19
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 116

Adonde and donde can be used interchangably? Or there is a difference in their usage?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pam904358

It' seemed to me that adónde means "to where" or "where to", and dónde means "where". I found a YouTube video that explains that adónde is about destinations and dónde is about locations. (Just search for donde vs adonde). I think Duo's lesson here is that in some translations, we may need to keep the "adónde/where to" construction in the sentence.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
  • 25
  • 22
  • 384

This is very helpful. Thanks, Pam! Have a lingot!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"To where are we going to travel" should also be accepted. I reported it.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raabe11
raabe11
  • 25
  • 25
  • 15
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 448

To where are we going to travel

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Travis963280

This is really the correct translation, IMO

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jigar.durgai

What is "Adonde"?? I typed "A donde", i.e. 'A' and 'Donde' separate and it showed incorrect.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johneller1

Second "to" requirement reported AGAIN 10/11/18

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan787174

We should not end a sentence with a preposition.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

That's an old school marm's tale. For English, as a Germanic language, it is typical and normal to end sentences with propositions. Latin scholars in the middle ages introduced this myth -- trying to impose Latin grammatical rules on English -- and non-scholars have perpetuated it ever since. It results in many awkward sentences such as the one Winston Churchhill created just to drive home this very point: "That is an errant pedantry up with which I will not put!"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raabe11
raabe11
  • 25
  • 25
  • 15
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 448

Whither are we going to travel

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amanuelrb

A donde?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

I believe that is also acceptable.
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/a%20dónde%20vas

If you use that on Duo, you will get a comment about a typo, but they accept it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nathan519079

Why can't I use Donde instead of Adonde?

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JhonyC
JhonyC
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 15
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
  • 1105

There is a mistake on the spanish sentence. The correct question is A dónde vas a viajar?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gearloose55

"Where are we going to travel" was accepted 2018-10-08

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mwah09
Mwah09
  • 24
  • 3
  • 219

After THREE times of being marked wrong for correct grammar ("To where are we going to travel?"), I finally remembered to enter the wrong answer ("Where are we going to travel to?") so my response could be counted as right! Thanks for your part in trying to kill the already dying rules of grammar, DL.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JhonyC
JhonyC
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 15
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
  • 1105

"already dying rules of grammar"?.

Where did you hear that?

It's grammar what makes a language a delight, otherwise everyone would speak like indians in western movies.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mwah09
Mwah09
  • 24
  • 3
  • 219

I completely agree. Let me clarify... in my opinion, recent generations are eschewing the rules of grammar. Perhaps a better way of phrasing would be, "the dying-off of respect for grammar rules"!

I assure you, it pains me to see proper grammar being shunned. Incidentally, referring to a previous commenter, I do not consider myself to be elitist for holding this opinion!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikinglis
spikinglis
  • 25
  • 25
  • 855

"Adónde" no existe en castellano, se escribe "A dónde" separado.

1 month ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.