"¿Paraquéquieresmáspapel?"

Translation:What do you want more paper for?

6 months ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth-Ellen4

Technically "What do you want more paper for?" is grammatically incorrect. Strictly speaking ending a sentence with a preposition is wrong. However, just about everyone talks like that, so it is OK for Duo to use it. The correct, although seldom used way of phrasing this would be "For what do you want more paper?" This sounds pretty awkward; a more natural translation would be "Why do you need more paper?" Duo doesn't accept either of the last two translations.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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"Why do you need more paper?" = ¿Por qué necesita más papel?

There is a difference between why do you need something (por qué) and what do you need it for (para qué). It's a subtle but important difference. However, it can help you to start to learn the difference between para and por. Most of us need all the help we can get with that.

Para qué is not as common, but in this case, it means what exactly are you going to do with this paper? What is the purpose for the paper?

The answer could be "I need the paper in order to do my homework" or to cover my walls with paper, or whatever it is that I am going to do with it. That's the purpose (con cual fin) .

Por qué is asking what is the reason that you need the paper . Why do you need the paper? What caused your sudden need for paper?

The answer could be "I need the paper because my teacher assigned us homework that is due tomorrow and I've run out of paper." That's the cause (con cual causa).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinchebob
pinchebob
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While I do not know all of the subtle distinctions between para qué and por qué in Spanish I see "Why do you want more paper?" and "What do you want more paper for?" as equivalent in English in terms of meaning but the first is far more natural (and wrong according to DL) My sentence used quieres not necesitas but to me the same holds true for need. I think this is a case of DL trying to force a distinction that exists in Spanish between para qué and por qué into a English where due to the flexibility of the language "Why?" and "What for? are used equivalently at least IMHO. If there is a distinction in English then it more subtle that the distinction between "shall" and "will". :-)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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I'm taking you are English-speaking, learning Spanish? While I assume you were hurt by the nasty owl marking "Why..." in your answer wrong (and I agree why ... ? and what ... for? are virtually the same) arent you missing the bigger picture in your grief? Duo is introducing us to this new "Why...: , para qué, and with the assustance of elizadeux, we can learn something - about Spanish!!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariza117439
Mariza117439
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Yes, pinchebob. As usual, what is offered by elizadeux above reeks of someone who does not know English as well as believed. The two expressions are synonymous and both need to be accepted. For every meaning/case offered above, "why" or "what for" could be used.

One GROSS, OUTSTANDING FLAW in the examples above is that the writer assumes that the person posing the question knew the answer, the other person's reason" in advance, but obviously, the person posing the question does not know that.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Muchas gracias Eliza - una explicación muy clara.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redsassafras

This was extremely helpful. Thank you.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariza117439
Mariza117439
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There may indeed be a difference between "por qué" and "para qué," but anyone who knows English knows that "why" or "what for" are used synonymously; thus, even when we understand that there is subtle difference in Spanish, we know that both suggestions are correct and normal in English to replace the Spanish expression/grammar, so Duo needs to accept both. I cannot believe that people are worshiping what is written above. In every case given, "why" or "what for" could be used in English, end of story, so Duo needs to accept both. Duo says that using "me" instead of "my" is correct, because it is natural for English speakers in certain countries, so people need to get off the pot and stop insisting that there is an important distinction between "why" and "what for," a distinction that is so important that is worth marking one wrong and one right.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WodgerWabbit

To be honest I disagree that "why" and "what for" are synonymous in English. The "why" focuses on the "reason" and "what for" focuses on the ultimate "purpose".

"Why are you doing that?" "Because I was told to" "But what for?"

Asking for the "purpose" is a more focused request. You are not asking about the doer's motivations, you are asking for the initiator's ultimate goals.

Of course a specific "purpose" is often one of the many "reasons" something is done. So "why" and "what for" can often be used interchangeably. But when someone asks a person "why" rather than "what for" (or vice versa) it initiates a slightly different thought processes and may illicit different answers as a result.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HableEspanol
HableEspanol
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Your explanation is pulled by the hair. The word mas says that the person already got paper and wants more. Both are the same in all day English or Spanish. I am not on seminar at the university in the 27th semester..

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transkter
transkter
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Sorry but in English what do you need something for and why do you need it are the same. It's fine that there is a different meaning in Spanish but there is no way to distinguish the two in English and in fact what do you need more paper for would be rarely said by anyone as you don't finish a sentence with a preposition so in actuality the correct sentence would be for what do you need more paper which would be almost never used except in Shakespeare. The only time I can imagine using what do you need more paper for is if you ask someone why they need more paper a dozen times and they kept giving you an ambiguous answer so you said yes but what for?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rriggstx

Like you, I thought this to be the rule. In actuality, this is an extension of a rule for Latin and erroneously extended to English. For reference: https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/prepositions-ending-a-sentence-with

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth-Ellen4

Cool, thanks. I’ve pretty much forgotten my Latin. I probably find this picking apart of languages far more interesting than I should!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greenatom
greenatom
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is grammatically incorrect.

No, it's not. That's a rule made up in the 1800s by Victorian Latin fetishists, along with not splitting infinitives.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfgetdown
dfgetdown
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It is correct. English is not Latin, and in English, a preposition is a perfectly acceptable word to and a sentence with.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Are you referring to ending a sentence in a preposition? There's not rule in English saying you can't do that. You don't have to believe me. Oxford Dictionary did a great blog post about it:

https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/11/28/grammar-myths-prepositions/

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diane72505

In the beginning I struggled a lot with duo's sometimes awkward use of English, but I have come to consider that not worth worrying about. The main issue is that they are helping us to learn languages in wonderful international forums and all for FREE! Thank you duo, you aren't perfect but you are great!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil712772

Why do you want more paper would be the easiest way to say it. If someone ever said to me 'for what do you want more paper?' I would think he was an alien trying to pass itself off as a human. Really, sometimes DL act like a bunch of dofusses ( that's goofs in real language )

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay977736
Jay977736
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We also say 'dingleberries', which has a much more negative connotation, rather than doofuses!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth-Ellen4

I think that this question is trying to teach us a subtle distinction. In English we could phrase this in two different yet very similar ways: 1) Why do you want more paper? 2) What do you want more paper for? Without endlessly debating the semantics of the Spanish question, I think that what Duo is trying to get at is this: the best translations are 1) ¿Por qué quieres más papel?
2) ¿Para qué quieres más papel?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transkter
transkter
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I'm starting to disagree with my own argument that they are the same. I can see a situation where I ask for more paper and someone says why do you need more paper and I say because I ran out at which point they might say what do you need more paper for and I would say for my newsletter.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terryedwar1

Not confused at all. I teach British English in the UK. Ruth-Ellen4 is absolutely correct.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneThorli

Bad English Grammar!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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Are you referring to ending a sentence in a preposition? There's not rule in English saying you can't do that. You don't have to believe me. Oxford Dictionary did a great blog post about it:

https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/11/28/grammar-myths-prepositions/

1 week ago
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