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  5. "Der Herr isst einen Apfel."

"Der Herr isst einen Apfel."

Translation:The gentleman is eating an apple.

March 26, 2013

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gusti1

Herr means more Mr or Lord not "The MAN eats an apple.". In case of man it wold be ... "Der Mann isst einen Apfel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aly.c.sch

How, when speaking, does one distinguish between isst and ist? Here if this sentence were to be formal, if I were to listen it could sound like

"The gentleman eats the apple"

or sarcastically, like:

"That gentleman is an Apple"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

Context.

"An apple" is in the Akkusativ form "einen Apfel" because the apple receives the action:

  • The gentleman eats (is eating) an apple = Der Herr isst einen Apfel

The verb "sein" (ist) has a linking function, so it takes the Nominative "ein Apfel":

  • The gentleman is an apple = Der Herr ist ein Apfel

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barnonahill

This reply has finally made it click in my head why masculine direct objects following sein don't use the 'en' ending. Danke schön!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah851648

It’s because they’re not direct objects or any objects at all, but predicative nouns referring to the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngusMacG

The man eats an apple is more apt than The sir eats an apple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tetraoxid

You could even translate this sentence to "God eats an apple" for the lulz


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelloHello

When is it appropriate to use Herr and when Mann? Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2591

Well, Mann translates as 'man', while Herr is 'mister', which is more formal as far as I know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiztedfate

Gentleman "Herr" is way more formal, Man "Mann" is more informal. If you are from the richer part of society or want to be more professional/polite (say to a customer or authority figure as two examples) you would say Gentleman.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdisonUnsworth

Herr is gentleman, so when you are being formal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radio.gnome

'sir' should be also be added


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilWorld

"isst" and "ist" sounds to me like the same. How can I distinguish them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

You can tell by context. "An apple" is in the Akkusativ form "einen Apfel" because the apple receives the action:

  • The gentleman eats (is eating) an apple = Der Herr isst einen Apfel

The verb "sein" (ist) has a linking function, so it takes the Nominative "ein Apfel":

  • The gentleman is an apple = Der Herr ist ein Apfel

There are comments about pronunciation on the webpage below. In summary, official dictionary pronunciation for "ist" and "isst" is the same: IPA [ɪst]

The exception is in informal language for "ist" where the "t" may be dropped. As well, other commenters indicate that there may be regional differences between "ist" and "isst".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TtT8b

do not know if herr means man in english..but mann means man. so herr actually means gentleman?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitryZ6

Why gent is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/finecrystal

'The sir' would generally be incorrect English. The only sense I think it could be correct would be referring to Knights in an abstract sense, otherwise you would just say 'Sir'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FisherLiz

Yes - in this context, "Herr" is used with a surname just as English uses "Mr. Smith"; when it's on its own as a noun, it translates as "The gentleman. . ." (I confidently expect such a gentleman to eat his apple with a fruit knife and fork, of course.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerryBarco

You address a knight or baronet as 'Sir' followed by his first name, eg "Sir John". You address a gentleman as "Sir" alone; or if you know him you can say "Mr Smith". There is never any occasion to say "a sir", or "the sir" - you probably mean a knight/gentleman/master/officer. The only time you would use "Sirs" is when addressing a group, or writing a formal business letter; it is very uncouth to use it to talk ABOUT them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BurakEren1

Why would the husband be rejected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ericsamuel94

Is your husband a Lord?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiztedfate

Herr never means "Husband". "Der Mann" or "der Ehemann" can be used for "Husband"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmmadelineee

To me it sounded like "der Held" (meaning the hero)... yikes! A German student of 3 years (in a class where ONLY German is speaken) and the verbal interpretation exercises on here always get me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiamondEye5

isn't using 'isst' in this context insulting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acuencadev

How do you say Like a sir in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WatchDogs

How can I pronounce "Herr"? Is it something like, [hea]"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BChauvin22

ok this is just stu to the pid. i am so so so damn tired of having to freaking spell out gentleman. this is dumb please stop. KYS duolingo. no lingots for you homie quan. stop the madness #killbinladen #duolingoisISIS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristbearerJoel

i put the instead of an


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orlandobp

'Der Herr' pronunciation sounds almost like just one word in Duo like "Deherr". Is that how Germans pronounce it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maximus856620

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