"Mi abuelo siempre se levanta a las cinco."

Translation:My grandfather always gets up at five.

4 months ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rabidace03

Mi abuelo es loco

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomer.ginzburg

Why do you have to add "me/te/se" in front of "levanta", and "las" on front of the hour?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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That's just the way it is. :-D

To get up = levantarse. It's a reflexive verb (indicated by the se on the end of the infinitive). Levantar means something else if you leave out the reflexive pronouns. (Check a good dictionary. Spanishdict.com is one.)

When telling time, use las before the hours two through twelve, and la before one (una).
A la una = at one (o'clock)
Es la una = It's one (o'clock).
A las doce = at twelve (o'clock)
Son las doce = Its twelve (o'clock).
The articles are not translated.

More on reflexive verbs and telling time: studyspanish.com (Grammar Unit Five).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulianBixler
JulianBixler
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"Levantar" means to lift or raise something up. This can be used normally with an object, but you can use it with me/te/se when you want to refer to "getting up". "Me levanto" means "I lift myself", or "I get up".

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esn024
Esn024
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For the second question, imagine that "horas" follows the number of hours. If it's more than one hour, then it's "las". People probably used to always say "hora/horas" when talking about the time. They don't anymore, but the grammar stayed the same.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

That's right. So, you are in effect saying "my granddad always gets up at (the hours of) five". When the number is singular, as in a time before two o'clock, you say "a la una y media" (for half past one), and whereas you would say "son las dos y media ahora" for "it's two thirty now" for a time with a number lower than two you don't use the "son las". For "now, it's one thirty pm," you would say "ahora, es la una y media de la tarde". Sorry this is badly explained, but these are very important points for telling the time in Spanish.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaviOnline

I think, "wakes up at.." should also be accepted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0KyfnlOF
0KyfnlOF
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It doesn’t mean the same.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koorosh_sadri

por que?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MihaiBirsan
MihaiBirsan
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Why does "wake up" not work?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Although that is what we are more likely to use as an expression in English (which is why so many people on this page are falling into this trap), here we are talking about something different, namely that "to get up" (levantarse) and "to wake up" (despertarse) are separate activities, and therefore, verbs. So "I get up at seven every morning to go to college" is "me levanto a las siete cada mañana para ir al colegio" but "I wake up at six every morning in summer" is "me despierto a las seis todas las mañanas en el verano".

1 week ago
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