https://www.duolingo.com/DanielleSh528752

So many different ways of saying things ..hoch..kluk..chlapec

Hey :) does anyone else find czech difficult, I think i'm doing relatively well but I have to finish all the levels in one section to be fully confident before going onto next.

As I'm going on to different levels I'm noticing there are more and more ways of saying things. Is there only in certain situations/conversations where you should choose one i.e. devce, divka a holka.

Thanks :)

June 23, 2018

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AmberjackCZ
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Everything depends on context. You as a foreigner will be forgiven for not speaking perfect Czech, don't worry :-)

But you are of course right. There are so many ways how to say anything in Czech. There are even many possible word orders as you may know now...

Děvče/dívka/holka...okay. I am saying "holka" (plural is "holky") in most cases. It is common word for me. But I may say "děvče" (interestingly, "děvče" is neuter gender, but "holka" and "dívka" are both female) to some of my friends in a teasing way (for instance "Ty seš/jsi hodné děvče" = "You are a good (meaning well-behaved in this case) girl") Difficult to explain. "Děvče" is more..I don't know...ancient to me. That is how I use my language. I am really sarcastic person. I sometimes choose unusual words or correct Czech to tease someone.

What does it mean "correct Czech"? Well, I live near Prague and we are using colloquial endings in our adjectives. For male gender -ej ("mladej" instead of "mladý" which is correct form and "mladý" = "young") or -ý for neuter ("hloupý" instead of "hloupé" for neuter gender, "hloupé" = stupid). By the way, -ý is the correct form for male gender, but colloquial for neuter. Correct form for neuter is -é. Luckily, there is no colloquial form for female gender, it is always -á.

I could say in a ironic way "Ty jsi milý chlapec" = "You are a nice boy" to some of my friends when he is not nice at all. Like, when he just put a salt to my beer (yep, that happened) :-) Normally, I would probably say "Ty seš hodnej kluk" (colloquial ending -ej, see?) to a 6 years old. "Chlapec" (and "hoch" as well) sounds more ancient (well, not really that ancient) to me than "kluk" which I use commonly.

Hope it helped a bit. Czech tongue is a complicated one, but always remember: You are a foreigner, we do not expect a perfect Czech from you.

To be honest, I am amazed anyone is learning my language at all. Hats off to you and forgive my imperfect English. Still improving :-)

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianM218751

hey that's what duolingo is for, to learn a new language or improve on one. I have friends near Prague and I plan on moving to Czech Republic in a year, I am super excited to learn this awesome language and to see everything that there is to see in Czech Republic.

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielleSh528752

ahoy! :) Your English is very good, you wrote that with such depth and clear explanation :) I definitely think I will get the hang of it slowly, I wish the app had Czech and had a thing where you can talk to it and it records your pronunciation because I'm better at writing than pronouncing the words in czech. like ty and ti ..I find very hard to hear differences in how you say them.

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/VladaFu
Mod
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This is something that can't be described easily. There are too many fine points. The words are often used ironically or sarcastically. They are used to denote actual little boys, large boys but also adults. That is also true for English "boy".

You can check the quantity of their usage in contemporary written and spoken Czech. But the main point is that they are used in various contexts by different kinds of people to denote different kinds of people. The usage will vary between different cases, especially the nominative and the vocative.

You can check these links (Psaný jazyk = written language, Mluvený jazyk = spoken language)

nominative sing.: http://syd.korpus.cz/5RGuM0qQ.syn vocative sing. : http://syd.korpus.cz/KCC4swzS.syn plural: http://syd.korpus.cz/Qy8niXJg.syn

These are for kluk, chlapec and hoch. You can switch to dívka, děvče and holka yourself.

I you switch Synchronní to Diachronní in those links, you will see the evolution of the frequencies in history.

June 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom_V.
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Don´t worry. You can use kluk (and holka) only. Of course, it is good to know what chlapec/hoch (děvče, dívka) means.

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianM218751

I have friends in Czech Republic and they help me out with stuff like that. I typically use holka (holky if plural) I don't actually know if there are certain situations for using dívka or děvče, but I will ask Lucie and Jakub (my friends in Czech Republic) this question and see what they say (you may already have an answer already but I have wondered this as well but just forgot to ask them)

June 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/david_cieszyn
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At least you're not frustrated by it :) https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/26706793

June 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TrudyBe

to me you can't go wrong with 'holka' and 'kluk' in everyday speech (bad in my case!) with Czechs. When I used to walk my dog in Prague I got asked on a daily basis 'Je to holka nebo kluk?!'. Occasionally I would hear 'samec' for male (dog) and sometimes 'fešák' meaning 'handsome dog'. His ears still perk up with pride when I say that to him.....I'm sure he's bilingual :))

March 20, 2019
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