"A glass of water."

Translation:Un vaso de agua.

6 months ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Donno5
Donno5
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Taza cannot be a glass?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catradar

They are saying that Taza is "cup" not "glass". I think this is being overly picky.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeganEspin

What is the different between "A glass of water" "Un vaso de agua" and "A meat sandwich" "Un sándwich de carne"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisRLowery

Literally just how each is said in English. It's common to say "a glass of water", not "a water glass" (the latter would read like a glass for water but not necessarily with any water in it), while it's common to say "a meat sandwich" rather than "a sandwich of meat".

Basically, this is just English being weird.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joanne641044

It stems from the French translation as in many cases;

Un vaso de agua (Spanish) Un verre d'eau ( French) A glass of water (English)

Pretty much the same to me!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Teddybear71
Teddybear71
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Sorry for the beginner's level question, but having completed the French course, I was wondering if Spanish ever contracts as with French. In this particular sentence the two last words would contract to "d'agua". Looks funny even writing it, actually...

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackDireWolf

Why didn't we use taza instead of vaso?

1 month ago
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