https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Popular books translated into Irish

My favourite resource is looking at books for children, especially ones I've already read. Most of the time they translate the same, and they've really helped me with grammar. Books that are supposed to rhyme in English (for obvious reasons) don't translate the same in Irish. I want to stick with them because I find it really fun to see how the've changed the story, but it's really difficult with how words change forms to figure out what it's saying.

I'm looking for advice or maybe someone somewhere has English translations of Irish translations :D It's a stretch, I know. I just don't want to give up on these books.

7 months ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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Have you looked at Web sites of online booksellers in Ireland, to see which popular English-language children’s books have Irish-language versions available?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guzenko

Hey, I see you've completed the Irish course, just wondering, how far did it get you in terms of fluency? My grandfather was Irish and I am considering learning.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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No course here will make a person fluent in a language. If you’re considering learning Irish, you can try this course to get a flavor of what Irish is like; if this course whets your appetite for learning more, then you can look into further areas of study to pursue fluency.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Yes, but they're at the library too, I've been using them already. As an example, my kids loved the Julia Donaldson books and I reckon I know a bunch of them by heart. I looked at the Irish versions in the library and it has been fun to see how they change the story to make the lines rhyme. But because the original material isn't as close in meaning anymore, I'm finding it more difficult to figure out. Non-rhyming stories help me with grammatical forms I don't know because I can look at the English version and work it out.

For example, the snail in An Seilide agus an Míol Mór says 'Sea' at one point. Just on its own. Normally I can look at the English version to find out what he's trying to say, but the translator had to change so much to make the words rhyme that it's not there in the English one. Am I making sense?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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Yes, you’re making sense. Rhyming stories will sacrifice literal translations to maintain the rhymes in translation, so perhaps using books for children that weren’t written in rhyme would be a better choice for comparing the originals to the translations.

If you prefer to stick with the rhyming stories and wish to figure out how to make sense of e.g. unrecognized noun declensions instead, then the first step is to recognize which case the noun has — nominative, genitive, or vocative. If the books are older or dialectal, then being able to recognize the dative could also be useful. Once you’ve identified the noun’s case, determining the noun’s dictionary headword form will be easier.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Yes, other stories that don't rhyme and have a more literal translation have been easier. I just.. really enjoy seeing how they've changed the story as well as seeing rhymes in another language. It's a lot more work, but I get a lot more kick out of it too. The books are in the last few years - I'm sticking mostly to Julia Donaldson because I know them so well in English.

I don't count on finding any translations of the Irish versions, so some help with the dictionary is useful, as you suggest. I will go take a look at how to recognise those cases, thank you. I've noticed genetive a few times but I've not been able to name any others.

Are apostrophes used to shorten words? I have th'anam 'on diabhal here and I'm thinking if the words are shortened then it'll mean something different.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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The nominative is the “standard” case of the noun — the one that is used as a dictionary headword. The vocative case is used to address someone or something, and is always preceded by the vocative particle a, which lenites. For example, “Pól, how are you?” would be A Phóil, conas atá tú?, using the vocative form of Pól. The dative case is only used in prepositional phrases, and distinct dative singular forms only exist for feminine nouns of the second and fifth declension classes. For example, Éirinn is the dative form of Éire. Dative plural forms always end in either -(a)ibh or -(a)íbh, regardless of the noun’s gender or declension class (e.g. the dative plural for the first declension masculine noun fear was fearaibh). Most dative forms have been replaced by nominative forms, so e.g. ar an leac is more common now than ar an lic.

Yes, if the writing is reflecting the spoken word (like English “I got ’em” reflects “I got them”), then apostrophes can be used to represent unspoken sounds. I’d say that th’anam ’on diabhal represents a pronunciation of d’anam don diabhal.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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Both A Mhaighdean and m'anam ón diabhal are used as exclamations of surprise - the NEID includes them in its definition of "Well!", but they might equally be compared to the common Irish exclamations "Holy Mother of God!" or "Jesus, Mary and Joseph!".

In this case go deo is just used as an intensifier though it could be read as "perpetual" or "everlasting" in this context, and it also provides the rhyme with leo.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Ahh ok gotcha. I think that makes sense actually, because the little snail is in wonder at his adventures :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Like this..

Cé hé seo atá ag deanamh ar an lic?

I can't find what lic means. Perhaps a form of leac, says the dictionary, which is a flat stone, but it's referring to a whale who is definitely not on any rocks.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
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The only noun lic that I could find was the old dative form of leac, which is appropriate after ar an. Perhaps it’s being used metaphorically, e.g. to refer to the surface of the sea? (“Flat stone” isn’t the only meaning of leac.)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Ahhh, that does make sense because the whale is in the quiet waters of a still night, thank you :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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I'm not entirely clear on what you're after - you want Irish translations of rhyming stories, but you want them with translations back into English?

I don't know about rhyming books, but for other translations, the "Horrid Henry" books have been translated as Dónall Dána.
Dónall Dána
Dónall Dána: An Club Rúnda (Horrid Henry and the Secret Club)
Dónall Dána: Míola (Horrid Henry's Nits)
Dónall Dána: Saibhreas Sciobtha! (Horrid Henry Gets Rich Quick)
Dónall Dána: Sióg na bhFiacla (Horrid Henry Tricks the Tooth Fairy)
Dónall Dána Teach na dTaibhsí (Horrid Henry's Haunted House)
Dónall Dána: An Feighlí Linbh Fiáin (Horrid Henry and the Bogey Babysitter)
Dónall Dána: Boladh Bréan! (Horrid Henry's Stinkbomb)
Dónall Dána: Díoltas (Horrid Henry's Revenge)
Dónall Dana: Mallacht an Mhumaí (Horrid Henry and the Mummy's Curse)

Roald Dahl's "Danny, the Champion of the World" is also available in Irish - Danny Seaimpín an Domhain

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EndaEB147

I know that Real Dahl's 'The Witches' is available in Irish as 'Na Cailleacha.'

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ficus12
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Knowing how I am, I find it not at all surprising that I straight up just jumped into Tolkien as Gaeilge. Probably should have at least started with some of the old children’s books. One thing I do try to do though, is read various articles on Vicipiéd, The Irish version of Wikipedia. It’s absolutely amazing just how many languages they have on there, Irish, Welsh, Cornish, Manx, Breton, Navajo! But that’s another story. Anyway, I find it useful to have a steady stream of Wikipedia articles that are, more or less, structured the same way, to read, or at least, try to read.

https://ga.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pr%C3%ADomhleathanach

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gerald699763

That's a good idea.... thx

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stardust103158
7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stardust103158

An Hobad, nó Anonn Agus ar Ais Arís: The Hobbit in Irish (Irish) Paperback – March 25, 2013

The Hobbit is also available in Irish, although that's a heavy book to wade through in English. Good luck!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stardust103158

Eachtraí Eilíse i dTír na nIontas (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in Irish) (Irish Edition)

Alice in Wonderland in Irish. This one is probably the cheapest. God bless Amazon.com

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyManni3

Thanks, but it's not those types of books I'm talking about. Your examples I can easily get from the library. It's the rhyming stories - for them to rhyme in Irish, they use different words, the story changes a bit and I find it difficult to find many of the words in the dictionary because they've taken on a grammatical form I don't know. When I don't know the grammatical form in a story like Harry Potter, I can look at the English version for help.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KaloYT

hi i would help u but i am very new too so i cant. i am just a biggener so i am very sorry about that

7 months ago
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