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"El avión llega a las dos menos cuarto."

Translation:The plane arrives at quarter to two.

3 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LoraineLoc

In the USA we also say 'a quarter til two" as in 'a quarter until two'

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PierreGaud1

I forgot to put the apostrophe too so I'm not going to report my answer as should have been correct, but "a quarter 'til two" is the second most common way I hear it said. "One forty five" is the most common. "A quarter 'til" rolls off the tongue a little easier than "a quarter to".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sassfb
sassfb
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A note on English here: you probably want to use "till" rather than "'til". Both "till" and "until" are complete words, and they are interchangeable. "'Til" is not generally accepted--according to dictionary.com, it is usually considered a spelling error. There is no reason to abbreviate "until", since we already have the perfectly good word "till".

And yes, "a quarter till two" sounds fine to me, too.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheTrueW

So 1:45

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

The plane arrives at 1:45.

Accepted. Sept. 2018

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/steveross574320

Why is this the only question where cuarto means teo???

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ggorzki
ggorzki
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No. Literally it would be: the plane arrives at two minus quarter

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvShiloh

In the USA, we are more likely to say “a quarter of two” than “a quarter to two”.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sassfb
sassfb
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I'm not sure that "a quarter of" is more common than "a quarter to", but both are used. I remember hearing "a quarter of" the first time when I was a kid, and it sounded very strange, since my family always said "a quarter to".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I wouldn't say either is "more likely." (Anglohablante de EE.UU.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sqeeezy

"a quarter to" not "quarter to"

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boredinthepurple

When you're German and you started to learn Spanish before duo had a spanish course for German speakers and so after years most of your mistakes are because English has stupid rules.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Loren295658

Every language has rules that make more sense when you understand the language. Do you ("boredinthepurple") REALLY believe that German rules are all (or even mostly) more sensible?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sassfb
sassfb
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I don't know German, but as a native English speaker I can say that English does have some stupid rules, and it also has many idiomatic expressions that just don't make sense. That is probably true of most languages.

1 month ago