"Le verre est assez profond."

Translation:The glass is rather deep.

5 years ago

78 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

If anybody said to me, "The glass is quite deep", or "The glass is deep enough", I'd think their grasp of English was quite poor. Glasses aren't deep. They are tall or short, wide or thin (slender, skinny). Not deep.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Britain's heavy reliance on the use of the Royal Navy at various points in it's history sometimes required the sudden uptake of manpower. This was accomplished by the use of so called press gangs. These gangs would virtually kidnap able bodied men (often violently) and turn them over to a Royal Navy ship just before it left port for a few months. (or even years)

To get around the civil liberties aspect of this practice, the gangs would frequent bars where they could find intoxicated patrons and offer them a mug of beer. These metal tankards of beer, which were popular then and now in British bars, were quite tall. The gang members would slip a shilling into the tankard of beer and encourage the usually drunk target to have a beer with them. When the unsuspecting drinker finished the the beer he would see the shilling in the bottom of the mug. At that point he was advised that by drinking the beer he had accepted the shilling as payment for joining the Royal Navy and that he was absent from duty. Then he was taken away with whatever force was necessary.

Bar owners, concerned about the loss of customers, worked out a response. They wanted to keep selling large glasses of beer so they had the tankards made with a glass bottom. That way, no matter how deep a tankard was, patrons could see objects on the bottom of the glass. To this day, traditional British pubs ensure that no matter how decorated their deep glasses of beer are, the bottom is transparent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BBHOOD

C'est profond lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpKNOCKOUT

That was amazing! Thanks for the info

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nirvik-the-Great

That, my friend, was awesome

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GloriaRoos

can this also be a way to say that the piece of glass is very deep in one's skin?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KingD-.-
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Wowu

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeZhiXin1987
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I've heard this said before actually. It doesn't seem too weird to me, if I was to hear it I would think of the glass being large or big.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jac228479

Well you'd say it was BIG enough then

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Virginia71473

Agreed

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blorbloz
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"The glass is quite deep" ? I don't know what that is supposed to mean. Does it mean the glass is tall? Or that it knows the meaning of life?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Miscr

It seems that "profond" carries both meanings according to wiktionary: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/profond

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProgressorM

Yet profound is not accepted, which should be a possibility according that link.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otismaxwell

What's wrong with "heavy"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dravard
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I agree. If the program lists heavy as a possible translation, then how come I was wrong to translate that the glass is heavy enough?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Well, because not all the possible translations you see in the drop-down list will work in the context you are working with. In the case of "profond", for example, you might refer to "un sommeil profond" - a deep sleep, or a heavy sleep. So "profond" can mean "heavy" in the right circumstances, but not in every circumstance.

If you are not in a position to judge whether a suggested meaning fits your sentence, I suggest resorting to a dictionary.

http://www.wordreference.com/fren/profond

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roody-Roo

Also, back in the 1960s, if somebody said something profound, you would respond, "That's really heavy, man." :=) But for describing the depth of a glass, no, heavy doesn't work.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpelle27
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How about "rather" as an alternative? As in "The glass is rather deep."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/varunk
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Yes, the glass is rather deep, is perfectly fine English. DuoLingo just does these things sometime. We just have to live with it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

Some phrases are mystifying because their translations are very unlikely to be used. With the word choice exercises, it can be a headache. The trouble is, you get stuck with 'that can't be right!'. But it is. Best to see it as mnemonic?!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

Why not "The glass is pretty deep?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
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I tried that, it rejected "pretty" for me too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stancollins

Right, it should probably take it, considering that 'quite' is more rare in American English. Reporting.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wuzizname

Without context, how would one ever now that the glass is not profound? If it's some kind of sculpture or something. I've never heard of anyone measuring the volume of a drinking glass in terms of "depth".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LarryHancock

I get it that Duolingo must have little or no staff, after all, this is a free service. Still, the clumsy English can be confusing and I can only suppose there is no one to correct these strange usages. The glass is deep? A well can be deep. A lake can be deep. A river can be deep. An ocean is always deep at some point. A glass, I suppose, in some unusual circumstance can be deep enough, maybe to hold flowers... but really...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xakk
Plus
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I have two fairly large, chalice-type drinking glasses at home. They are both quite deep. I don't see anything wrong with this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laiser
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Question on pronunciation- the robot voice doesn't do it, but I assume you would carry over the "t" from "est" to the work "assez" so it would sound like "es tassez", right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stopbeingsoanno

laiser, this is my question exactly, can anyone tell us why we don't hear the t in estassez? Please?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianBoru4
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You would sound the t but NOT the s. So it would sound like 'et-assay'. The robot voice (female) often sounds the s when it shouldn't, especially in 'tu as'.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
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But the steel is shallow, and a little giddy.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisaskier

I cannot imagine any instance where this sentence would be used or accepted in BritE.

As commented on by other Duolinguists, water can be deep, a well can be deep but a glass would never be referred to as deep.

I had this as a listening exercise , because a glass being deep made absolutely no sense whatsoever to me I got it wrong.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Buddhafly13
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The glass is overwhelming enough... no?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Veekhr
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"overwhelming" probably won't work as a synonym for deep. I don't see it as a synonym in my dictionary anyway. In French, you can translate "overwhelming" as "accablant"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Good heavens, and what on earth would it mean?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sr.luddie

i think this should be, the drink is quite overwhelming

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lknowlesf

It sounded to me like "vers" - the grass is quite deep - we usually say a glass is tall.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Vers = worms

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankRiswick
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In the listening exercise I wrote: 'le ver est assez profond' and that was accepted. It would mean 'the worm is rather deep'; under the ground I suppose.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonnerredebrest

Me too - and vers is also "verse" (as in poetry), so it would make sense wouldn't it? Is there an audible distinction between verre and vers?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

You would hear a liason with vers, I think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talbois

What's wrong with "very deep"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

assez=quite or enough. For "very" you would need très, or perhaps bien?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HNPG
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Can't it be more meaningful as: Le vert est assez profond.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

As a listening exercise? I don't see why not.. They should sound the same.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kpelle27
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I believe this wouldn't have the same pronunciation because there would be a liason between "vert" and "est" (you would pronounce the t).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

That liaison might be optional (the liaison between est and assez I think is required).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RicJohnson

I also agree that "Le verre est assez profound" could translate as "The glass is rather heavy". Lift a lead crystal glass manufactured by Waterford Crystal. I am certain you will agree as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

The only sense in which profond can mean heavy is for a sigh, a silence or a sleep, according to my dictionary. In other words, only heavy in a metaphorical sense that we use in English. I don't believe that if an object is described as profond in French, that could ever mean heavy in English (as in weight). The French would use a different word to indicate that meaning (lourd, most likely).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mari847170

I had multiple choice and chose "heavy" as in The glass is rather heavy. This should also be accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

No, because profond can only mean heavy in a metaphorical sense, like a "heavy sigh" or a "heavy sleep" (a deep sleep). For a heavy object, you would use lourd.

Not all the multiple choice answers are correct in every context. You have to use your judgment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nozz44

In English a "deep" glass is more likely to be referred to as a "tall glass. I, therefore, used "big" as being more appropriate to the context....how wrong can you be! Ah, the joys etc...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davidaston0

I got this one wrong as in : le vert est assez profond but it WAS marked cOrrect????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Duo will sometimes accept what it regards as typos if said typo does not represent another actual word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah21189
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Except 'vert' is an actual word. It means 'green'. So it shouldn't have been accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaIramendy

Is it wrong to say the glass is enough deep?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

Yes, that is wrong in English. It must be "deep enough."

See the discussion immediately below. You should always check the other answers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchFireBird
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Assez can mean very right? It wouldn't accept that for me, and very is what I was taught for assez to mean.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

My dictionary says "enough," and also gives "rather, quite" as alternatives. Not "very."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ioannis1644

I think it should be heavy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trudie1962

Profond also means heavy. I wrote that 'the glass is heavy enough.' This also makes sense in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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Profound is never used to mean physically heavy in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

Physically heavy would be lourd. Profond can only mean heavy in a metaphorical sense: A heavy sleep (ie a deep sleep).

A detailed dictionary will give enough information to distinguish literal from metaphorical meanings.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marie00r
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Lovely historical explanation but not really an everyday translation in my opinion. As the previous author has said, fluent English usage be tall or large or even full, if volume was being referred to. Why was "heavy" not accepted?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiladWaleed

can we say "le verre est profond assez" ?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

No. The word order in French is different from English.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/solaodut

the word "assez" sounded as "fait"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lizzie898860

I saw another definition for profond: heavy. I used that and it was wrong. Can someone say why it’s wrong? Thanks.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nzchicago

That's a metaphorical meaning. It's just like in English: We can say a "heavy sleep" instead of a "deep sleep." It's not used to mean physical heaviness - that would be "lourd."

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/illutale

Hiw is glass deep?!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/northernguy
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It is the glass. As such it is assumed to be referring to a drinking glass.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IvorBrent

in English this implies too deep. Is this what you mean?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MalikDaiquan

This is a listening challenge. With the listening challenge, it gets hard to dissect exactoyy what the voice is saying, how can i grow to understand it better and respond faster? Are there websites for that?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/semaphoredm

A very silly sentence.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
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What's wrong with The glass is enough deep? Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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It's about the word order. You must say, "The glass is deep enough". As part of the context of an on-going discussion about how deep it must be to accomplish some purpose, the remainder of the thought is understood, but not spoken, from what has been previously said. For example, "The glass is deep enough...(to hold 12 ounces of milk)".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProgressorM

Looks grammatically weird. Perhaps Duo does accept 'The glass is deep enough'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/safaa.hend
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Yes, it accepts "The glass is deep enough."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jac228479

A nonsense line.

2 years ago
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