"¿Sabes quién es aquel hombre?"

Translation:Do you know who that man is?

7 months ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JohnNg13

Do you know who is that man *

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
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No, this is not normal English word order.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauraEvans27002

I am an American and I think it works. One can say, "Who is that man?" and adding "Do you know" doesn't make it wrong.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
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I'm also American... primarily Southern and Midwestern dialects. It seems to me that 'Who is that man' is a question in and of itself. Generally, when I hear 'Do you know...' added in front, the initial question gets altered slightly. Don't know if there's an actual rule. It's just been my experience.

How do you say dog in Spanish? becomes Do you know how to say dog in Spanish?

Where are they going? becomes Do you know where they are going?

Who is that man? becomes. Do you know who that man is?

Would be interested to know if there's a rule that covers it. I tried to dig around a bit, but not knowing how to phrase it, I came up blank.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenSho20

They aren't the same question. The answer to "who is that man" would be the man's name or "I don't know. The answer to "do you know who that man is" would be "yes/no".

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/durasplice
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That is what I put. That is the way we speak in Louisiana.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fopsomer

Yes, I think that's correct too. But I got no points for that.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackBird210

Could this be "Do you know who that man is over there" since aquel means "that over there" or at least something of that sort. This is what I was taught. Is this wrong?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
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A comment I read a few weeks ago described it like this:
Este / esta means this (near me)
Ese / esa means that (near you)
Aquel means that (further away from both of us).

I hope that helps.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44

I think people explain the difference between ese and aquel by saying the former is distant enough from tbe speaker to be 'that' rather than 'this' whereas the latter is even further away, illustratively not merely 'that' but 'that over there'. However, that does not mean you translate aquel with those words I think.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

Why not "conocer" instead of "saber"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
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This is a bit of a trick question because if the English answer was *Do you know that man? " it would be conocer (to know someone) but it is actually asking if you know who that man is. So really you're asking if you know a fact or some information, therefore it is Saber.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
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For those who feel "Do you know who is that man?" should be marked correct, here's a little info I tracked down on "Indirect questions".

Indirect questions are polite (and slightly longer) forms of direct questions. Often used when asking directions or asking info from strangers.

An indirect question has two parts. It starts with a polite phrase (Do you know..., Can you tell me..., Do you have any idea...). Then a question that DOES NOT follow the usual verb/subject order. Also, the 'indirect' half of the question shouldn't contain auxiliary verbs like 'do', 'does', and 'did'. (I believe 'is' would fall in this category)

When does the party start? (Direct)

Do you know when DOES the party start? (Incorrect use of Indirect)

Do you know when the party starts? (Correct Indirect).

Hope that helps... and kudos to Duo for helping improve my English as well as my Spanish :-)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ii6rr5
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This is a Spanish class. People don't have to be scholars in English to learn colloquial Spanish.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ii6rr5
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Requiring who that man is and rejecting who is that man is ridiculous.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnNg13

Do you know who that man is Same too

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caroline56362

I said "do you know who is that man". I think it should have been accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

I agree. Or then, we are both wrong.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sTanyaPawa

How is "Do you know who that person is" wrong?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John389706

I translated it as 'do you know who is that man?', which looks & sounds in (northern England) english OK. On reflection, I think it has a slighly different meaning, with a pause after 'know' and before before empasising 'who is that man?'. I suppose it would then be punctuated by a comma after 'know'. Perhaps a writer would then add 'he/she asked with a questioning frown' to make the emphasis clear.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/del537547

how does aquel become just 'that' rather than "that over there"?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jerry844575

There is nothing wrong with the word order of "Do you know who is that man.?

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
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Agreed, but it would be better with a comma after do you know.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brad916027

I think this is the first time hearing "paquel." Not sure what that is. I had to guess from the sound of it how to spell it, but don't understand the meaning.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
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Did you mean to type aquel there? Paquel doesn't exist in Spanish?

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brad916027

Well... that's odd then. Because that's what I thought I heard and typed in. And it took it. I didn't notice, but maybe it marked it as a typo and still accepted it.

1 day ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
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Could be. I've looked up the word and i couldn't find it in my spanish dictionary

20 hours ago
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