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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reklolf

How to write if diacritic isnʼt avaible?

I know how add and use Czech keyboard, but I wonder: is here any standart with only English letters? Example of German: letter with umlaut → letter + e.

How would you write č, í etc?

June 28, 2018

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/widle

The Czech language doesn't use any transliteration for letters with diacritics - if necessary, we just ignore the diacritics. Some people actually don't bother with typing the diacritics in chat and other informal texts. The resulting text is a bit harder to read, but mostly works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reklolf

Oh, I get it. I thought that you do like: á→aa, č→cz or kinda of this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/widle

No, we don't. Simply á→a, č→c.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katzenperson

I see cz for č all the time, not because the letter cannot be formed by the keyboard, but because some forum/board software will not show it correctly. For example, at a trivia site I participate in, we use cz because the letter č will not show up correctly in the various teams' message boards, even when one uses a Czech keyboard.

Not that we all speak Czech of course, but there is a player from Czechia on our team, and some of us are learning her language. And we write trivia questions about words in various languages, include Czech!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

That is not what natives do. Czech natives, when not bothering to use diacritics, will just write c.

What you do use is what dey used in the Middle Ages and what Polish still uses to sime extent. A current Czech native will just be confused by it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InPxgX6K

As has been mentioned, the alternative is simply to do without the diacritics.

Years ago I asked a Czech friend what would happen if you wrote without diacritics and he said: ”Nothing, people will just think you're abroad and don't have access to a Czech keyboard”.

In that sense it is sort of like Arabic or Hebrew, where the vowel marks are mostly superfluous for fluent speakers.

I do find it a lot more difficult to read without diacritics though, and there is a good chance that I will mispronounce any personal names or words that I am unfamiliar with.

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