"I feel tired today."

Translation:Me siento cansada hoy.

5 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

"me" vs "yo"? Rather than "yo" here they are using "me" and I'm wondering why and what the difference is. Anybody?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jesse475786

From what I understand siente is a reflexive verb and thus requires a reference to who it's referring to, thus "me".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark359873

Thanks Jesse. Yes, I did some research and you're correct. I guess DL is priming us for another aspect of the language to come.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacobus645954

Affirmative

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yydelilah

Doesn't "siento" (feel) imply "yo siento" (conjugation of sientar)? Bit confused why the "me" is needed at all.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jelling2

It accepted "Yo estoy cansada hoy".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris750811

Do we really need the "me"? Isn't "Siento consada hoy" enough?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Siento always requires a "me" in front of it. Sientes requires a "te". Siente requires a "se". Always. No matter what.

So if a sentence has a person talking about themselves, put a "me" in front of the siento. Note, this is not the same as an English "me". while looking like it. It means, "myself". It's like when I talk about my feelings in Spanish I am referring to myself and need to say so, and that is why the "me" needs to be in front of a siento. Always. "Yo me siento cansado." Or "Me siento cansado." "I feel tired" is the translation while the meaning is: "I, myself, feel tired."

In English use of the word, "myself," is commonly not used, but is understood. "I, myself, feel well" becomes, "I feel good."

When a sentence is talking about somebody a "se" needs to be in front of a siente. "se" means, herself or himself, and so forth. "Ella se siente triste." "She feels sad," or ,"She, herself, feels sad." The latter is the meaning of the Spanish sentence, the former is a translation into English.

When the sentence is telling us something that has to with a person who talking to another person who is a friend or family member, a "te" needs to go in front of a sientes. "Te sientes feliz." "You feel happy." That is the translation, while the meaning of the Spanish sentences is: "You, yourself, feel happy." Now that is not a translation but a description of the meaning of the Spanish sentences written out in English.

"Te" means, "yourself."

Fundamental rule: Always stick this stuff in front of the Spanish word for feeling. Always.

These little words have to be used. Why? 'Cause it's Spanish!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Randy74573

Great explanation, thanks!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alan200588

Lo siento, pero eso no es totalmente cierto...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DefyLimitations

Thanks! The "I, myself, feel happy" puts another piece of the puzzle together. I had gotten that "lo siento" literally translates to "I feel it", and that if I was, say, testing the water before jumping in, I would then skip the reflexive pronoun, and say something like "Yo siento el agua". One more dot connected!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Was shown this alternate translation:

"Me siento hoy molida."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlorenceDA344253

Eugene, you are and have been tremendous help. Your explanations are clear.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trumaine7

Why's this wrong "Yo siente consado hoy"

1 month ago
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