"¿Conquiénviniste?"

Translation:Who did you come with?

6 months ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BCain1

At the least, please allow "With whom did you come?" . In English, prepositions should have objects following the preposition.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maladroitful

Thank you! Yes, that is the rule I was trying to articulate.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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That was accepted from me today (Aug 24).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane821964
Jane821964
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Agree! It was disallowed for me! I'm shocked! Although in everyday English we often end a sentence with a preposition it is poor use of language, and surely we should be encouraged to use our own language correctly when learning another!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

Why do people persist in perpetuating the myth that it is bad or incorrect to end a sentence with a preposition? What are they thinking of? It is a natural, linguistic structural characteristic of Germanic languages --including English.
Before making such pronouncements, do some scholarly research.
There are so many uninformed comments in this forum about what is "correct" English by people who've not done even basic linguistic research that it's hard to keep up. (Or, would you say "up keep"?
It is hard enough for those DL users who aren't native language speakers to learn standard English without exposing them to school marm myths about how the language should be spoken or written. Avoiding prepositions at the ends of English sentences almost invariably leads to awkward, stilted utterances that call attention to themselves rather than to the message the speaker or writer intends.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger654478

With whom did you come is correct!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vascotuga251

Whom did you come with.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonijgcarter

With whom did you come?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maladroitful

In English, it should be "With whom did you come." That whole not ending a sentence with a preposition.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vascotuga251

It's the same thing, but the scandinavian influence in English is just too strong. Prepositions coming at the end of a sentence is a common thing now.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

In modern English, "whom" is going the way of "whither" and "wherefore". An axiom of linguistics is that what is incorrect becomes correct when it is more commonly used -- and what was correct moves linto obsolescence. So far as ending sentences with prepositions, that is a characteristic of Germanic languages in general. Trying to force Latin grammar on English doesn't succeed when it runs afoul of nature syntax.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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Knock, knock
Who's there?
To
To who?
To whom, surely!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

My name's not Shirley!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

While I will abstain from the who/whom discussion, I thought I would shed some light on "Why am I being marked wrong for who came with you?" In English I agree they appear the same. In Spanish they need different verbs. In pretérito --viniste (used in the question given) "¿Con quién viniste?" (word for word- with who you came) but proper English has to be- Who did you come with? (A sop to the purists-With whom did you come?) If you wanted to say "Who came with you?" in Spanish it would be ¿Quién vino contigo? This is because the action of to come-Venir- has the tense built into the conjugated verb. Who came in Pretérito is vino.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mara186484

who came with you? why is that wrong?????

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elojo1

Absolutely.... nothing wrong with " who came with you"

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoGirard

In better English: "With whom did you come?"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

"With whom did you come ?" Should be accepted but I was not feeling that brave this morning so I thought I would just mention it here and move on.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

Having read the above let me just ask these questions

1) If the structure of Spanish sentences is a good thing to know how can said structure be properly learned if the translation FROM (not shouting but need to emphasize) Spanish to English either clouds or completely obscures said structure.

Is it not possible that at some point we should simply throw the entire unwieldy rickety contraption called English grammar UNDER THE BUS ? (At least for this issue) I feel like the time spent concerning ourselves with correct English is frankly a waste because the the purpose of this content is not to teach English grammar. The quality control on translations from English to Spanish is now so bad (and getting worse) that I will say that if it were possible to simply look at unidirectional translation JUST from Spanish TO English I would risk it and would welcome a user configurable setting to control restrict this content accordingly

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuisAviado

"who came with you" should be accepted.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noreen43949
Noreen43949
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MUST be with whom did you come or Whom did you come with. NOT who

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark38926

Proper English sentences do not end with prepositions. The correct answer is: With whom did you come. Try not to ever end English sentences with a preposition! This is basic.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Josh695473

That's the sort of pedantry up with which I shall not put.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vascotuga251

Yes! A true English sentence can never end with a preposition. However, thanks to the Viking invasions, English evolved in such weird ways. If you think French plays the role as the biggest influencer then you're wrong, Old Norse is! Compare an English sentence with any North Germanic one in Scandinavia and you'll see that they look very very similar grammar-wise.

Let's say...
- Grammar: Old Norse
- Lexicon: Anglo-Norman (French)

Basically what I want to say is, the reason English has this ability to end a sentence with a preposition comes from the vikings, blame them, not the general population

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John355524

Thanks for explaining why I can never get my Swedish wife to speak correct English!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelMateo16

Who came with you, should have been accepted

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2

That is a different idea. It's a translation of "Quien vino contigo?" (I'v omitted the accent marks for the e in quien and the o in vino.)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BCain1
  • Who came with you?
  • With whom did you come?
  • Who did you come with?

All of the above mean EXACTLY the same thing. While I do not choose to use prepositions without objects, others do so. In any event, I believe that ALL three of the constructions shown above should be allowed.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenPai
KarenPai
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Is not "who came with you" the same as 'who did you come with?" I was marked wrong for that.

1 month ago
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