https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles

Test-out is pretty OP

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I really appreciate the ability to jump to Level 5 on skills now. It was very frustrating and demotivating having to to run through a thousand lessons of languages just to "unlock content" that was incredibly easy and didn't bring me anything. So props on that.

However, getting hundreds of XP for answering some questions for 2 minutes (especially if I was already confident with the material) seems really over-powered. In particular, it doesn't match with the feeling of XP Duolingo has always had: to get XP you need to work hard, consistently, over a long period of time. Grinding essentially.

This philosophy, learning over the long-term, always correlated well with language learning. Now, aside from unlocking the content (which is a reward in and of itself), XP is thrown at you.

As an example, my friend, learning German, shot from level 13 to level 18 in a couple of days.

July 4, 2018

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
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Testing out has always awarded the same amount of XP as doing the equivalent lessons once the long way; the trouble is that crown levels have significantly increased the XP necessary to 'complete' a course to gold, without any corresponding change in the numbers of points required to get to any given XP level.

Anyone slogging through crown levels the repetitive way will eventually gain just as many points as the 'overpowered' reward for taking a shortcut, so it doesn't really seem fair to penalise users for already knowing material; it is the relationship between XP and flag levels that needs to be re-jigged, if anything.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve254604
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I generally agree with your comment and with Druckles’. For my part, I just got to Level 25 in German yesterday, which represented a year of work (on top of other German-language study in other arenas) — mostly 10 XP at a time, but with some stories, etc., and some 20 XP rounds back when we had the timed feature. But it makes little sense to be comparing your XP with your friends’ if they are keying it up and you’re on the straight-and-narrow. As others have pointed out, it also screws up the weekly competition in the clubs.

I believe one person in one of my clubs has 7500 or so points this week, for example. I don’t begrudge him/her that, but again, some of us are plodding along 10 XP (and 2 XP) at a time. Of course, at the end of the day, it’s a free resource, and a good one; I get it. I’ve gotten a lot out of Duolingo, and I still do. But for me, changes like this are a bit of a cautionary tale against over-reliance on this single resource.

Anyway, I have now vented. Catharsis achieved; new equilibrium established.

Edit: It just occurred to me, I suppose it depends on how you view XP. Are they for “knowing the material”, or are they for “doing the work”? My views and comments were strongly shaped by my stance, as I gather was Druckles’ view, that it is the latter. But if the former, then maybe reworking the relationship with the levels is indeed the way to go here...

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
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xp has never reflected "knowing the material". Very little on Duolingo ever was (except maybe progress in the tree, but that's not even visible anymore). This reflects a change in paradigm in Duolingo. Especially difficult for anyone who has put in the work up till now. It changes the meaning and thereby how you feel about it.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
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xp has never reflected "knowing the material". This reflects a change in paradigm in Duolingo.

XP has always reflected the ability to pass certain sets of questions, which itself is a reflection of knowing the material. This starts off as very short-term knowledge, and, over time, becomes longer-term knowledge. It also operates under the assumption that people will progress through trees, and so greater XP scores generally correspond to more material covered, and thus more material present in one of the stages of memory. Of course, everyone has his own speed and the material covered by two individuals with the same flag level might vary considerably, but the general principle still holds, and XP/flag-level is primarily there as a personal motivation.

It used to be the case that DL had the heart system for all lessons, and if you didn't grasp the grammar/vocabulary of a new lesson quickly enough, you'd have to start again without gaining any XP; nowadays, users have unlimited chances and it is much more possible to bludgeon one's way through a lesson without having to grasp it so well. If anything, XP less reflects 'knowing the material' than it used to, and not the reverse, in my opinion.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Quattrostelle

XP also measured your willingness to grind through lessons. Not so much anymore.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve254604
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Agreed.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
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I believe one person in one of my clubs has 7500 or so points this week, for example. I don’t begrudge him/her that, but again, some of us are plodding along 10 XP (and 2 XP) at a time.

I think these sorts of comparisons have always been the case. People could always test out trees if they knew the material and get large lumps of XP. People could also get sometimes huge quantities of XP from immersion by making very basic translations, just for the sake of coming at the top of their own personal league table.
At least, in the current crowns system test-out feature, one can only test out a skill to level five once, and anyone who knows the material has an equal opportunity to do so.
I usually plod along with 10/20/30 XP per active language like you, although I plodded twice as quickly before the introduction of the crowns and the relegation of timed practice to behind a gilded curtain at crown level five.

I suppose it depends on how you view XP. Are they for “knowing the material”, or are they for “doing the work”?

The only purpose of doing the work is to know the material, so I do tend to regard them as more a reflection of the latter. However, perhaps I in a minority in having this feeling. Also see my comments above to Druckles, which were really equally in response to this comment of yours.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/katherinekemp3

I could not care less who has more crowns or XP. Can they speak, write and understand the language, that is important!!

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
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Hence 'the only purpose of doing the work is to know the material'. Levels and XP are just artificial markers along the road to internalising the material in a course, which itself is a single (though not insignificant) marker along the road of gaining genuine proficiency.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve254604
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Your points are well taken, but some of us do rely more heavily on extrinsic motivators. Levels and XP are “just” artificial markers, sure, but then, why strive for the next one? Or the next level in a game? Or anything? If there weren’t a competitive element, for some of us, it would be much less entertaining. Hence some of the frustration at the sense of “changing the rules” midstream.. The “gamified” nature of Duolingo, mentioned below, is part of what keeps us coming back. “Internalizing the material” is in one sense certainly the ultimate goal, but in another sense it is a consolation prize in a week where someone stomps me in XP :)

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JasperMeijerink

I would say XP reflects doing the work, since it expresses the experience of going through the lessons. If Duo would diconnect XP from level, it would make more sense.

XP is displayed in a period of time, like "XP this week", indicating how active someone was in increasing the skill set. The level, in contrast, is displayed in a moment of time, indicating how well someone knows the material.

Testing out, then, would increase the level up to that reflecting the person's skill, but should only grant 10XP. So if someone has, let's say, a level 20 in a language and only 400 XP, we can deduce that this person already knew most of the material.

July 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JavierAvellan

@garpike... you got your wish. Now you only get 20 XP for testing out regardless of how many lessons were in that level. I think it stinks that it was changed but I get it.

March 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ReddySrikar
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This really is a demotivator for me and mant others... I am sure. :( I hope Duolingo goes back to the old way.

Are you happy now @garpike ??????????????????????????????????????????????????

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/tcholoss
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I don't like it either. If I knew this is going to happen I would have maxed my trees out. I feel like I am lagging behind people, who are learning a language from the basics.

March 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@tcholoss

quote:
I don't like it either. If I knew this is going to happen I would have maxed my trees out. unquote

If it is true that your language level justifies testing out of the entire tree, then you are using the wrong app. But if it is not true that your language level is five crowns on the entire tree, then your assertion was an error. But some people aren't ready to admit this. Can you say "I was wrong." ?

quote:
I feel like I am lagging behind people, who are learning a language from the basics.
unquote

After you finish dealing with your feelings, it will no longer feel unpleasant to be behind the leaders in XP. If you feel hurt, then the solution is to scream and cry and do whatever it takes to feel your feelings.

It is only after you accept the truth that language level does not equate with Duolingo XP that you become free. The truth will set you free to correct your problems. Your responsibility becomes clear in the light of the truth:

My responsibility is to get over it.

March 20, 2019, 3:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ppelk
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I'm just testing this out with Swedish (which I have studied beyond the Duolingo level), and I think that even though you get loads of XP a bit too 'easily', the good side is that testing out allows you to identify the skills in which you need more practice. This appears to be useful at least for me.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
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Absolutely. The test out feature is much needed, especially since the Update-that-must-not-be-named.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

A good test - out feature is much needed. But a bad test - out feature belongs in the trash can.

Here is an analogy. Do we (the human race) need sex? Well, the human race would become extinct without it. So we (the human race) must need it.

But does anyone want to advocate that indiscriminate sex is much needed? Speak up! Let's hear about the upside! Tell us more about the good side! If you can explain how it is useful, then it must be a good idea for all of us, right? Keep reminding us that we need it.

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/louis.vang
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Indeed, it is to easy to get a skill to an higher level.

Sometimes there are only 4 questions to get to the higher level. Many times you get four times the same question in one test out.

I got more than 3000 XP in one hour and upgrated to level 24.

But my strenght is only 56%.


There should be a minimum of 10 questions. In one test, there should be never the same questions. Testing out 30 lessons should not give you 300 XP. 20 XP should be enough. With a maximum of twenty questions in a test, that is still one xp for each question.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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Sometimes there are only 4 questions to get to the higher level.

Wow! For me it's always been 20. That's quite the difference, and a lot more stunning than the already big differences people mention in how long the ordinary lessons are.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Riplinked
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I think you’re missing the real point of it: it’s very much for intermediate learners who are coming fresh to Duo. That XP and the levels will more accurately reflect their actual experience/proficiency with a language.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve254604
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But here again we have that divide. From my perspective, the XP / Levels were less about what you knew than about how much work you had put in specifically on Duolingo (although there was always testing out, etc., which could net you a certain number of XP).

Think of it this way: I’m a native speaker of English with a good command of the language, and I don’t need any XP for that to come across in my comments. But if I’m going to comment in the German forums, for example, a high level in Duolingo can substitute for readers’ firsthand knowledge (i.e., it is a signaling mechanism, so that the “market” in information functions more smoothly). For me, that is the “real point” of XP. If I can’t communicate with more-or-less perfect proficiency, then you don’t know how much German (or Czech, or Vietnamese, or what-have-you) I know. Lots of XP combines with my skill in written German, at least to the extent that it tells you that I’ve been around the block on Duolingo for a long time, if nothing else. It’s imperfect, but valuable nonetheless. Separately, it also indicated a sense of having worked a fair amount, and there was some sense of personal achievement associated with it. (I felt a little ridiculous writing that last sentence, but then I thought, no — I’m owning this. I’ve spend a lot of time on this site, and those who have, can feel a sense of accomplishment...)

Edit: Anyway, not to bang on about this... Duolingo will do what it does, and I (and the rest of us) will at some point just have to roll with it...

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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Some of one's feelings on this are undoubtedly strongly influenced by how long one has been on the site. I arrived when Immersion still existed, so level 25 wasn't an indication of much of anything. You could easily see what people did and didn't understand by seeing what sorts of basic errors they were still making even in attempting to understand texts in the languages they had level 25 in. I basically don't trust people's answers on much of anything unless I know they're a native speaker of the language they're talking about.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve254604
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I see your point. Nonetheless, the forums are haunted by various eminences grises who often have something interesting to add...

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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I do make an exception for Klingon :)

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NtateNarin

I agree that it is a lot of XP. I remember seeing a Duolingo user get a bunch of level 25s in different languages in just a few days. It makes me question if some people are just using the key feature, plus Google Translate, to just get as many level 25s as they can for bragging rights? Of course, they are only cheating themselves, as level 25 flags don't mean much if you can't speak a word of the langauge you claim to study.

Then again, maybe they are gifted and got fluent in a bunch of new languages a day?

Anyways, I really do like this feature, and it really helped me in my French to English tree as I already knew so much of the material. I would just like it to give less XP with the key feature.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Snorkelton
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well thanks to this sort of whining they're only giving out 20xp per test out regardless of what level you're on, which is too little. the xp given should be equivalent to whatever you'd get if you went thru all the lessons the normal way.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
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Well I'm happy action was taken. That doesn't mean I agree with the result. Nor agree that your comment is particularly constructive.

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Snorkelton
Forums facilitate a variety of interests. One of these interests is whining. Everybody whines at different times in our lives. I do it. She does it. And so does he. But nobody likes to admit it.

There is this sort of whining. And there is that sort of whining.

Now give me my XP! I want my XP!

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert434576

I will do all of the lower lessons one by miserable one. I am too much of a perfectionist to ' jump ahead.' It would bug the heck out of me not knowing if there is one or two things I actually missed in there. Something that I will get later on, but could have got at an early stage. I just feel it is more thorough when you do each lesson, which is how the lessons are actually designed anyhow - to be taken in sequence. I do not believe you can rush learning anything - including a language. Just like I wouldn't rush learning Trigonometry or Calculus, for example. For some people it works, but not my cup-of-tea. (just my thoughts on the topic)

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Arrahn
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Hear hear!

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruel-Stroud

Remember you can only jump lessons if you know enough the language so it isn't unfair to make more XP, it is merit. I can't do it with French or Japanese for example (I tried it), if you try to use google it don't works so you really need to be fluent to use the shortcut.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Decktor
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I received the test out option yesterday and I got 4,900 XP in one day. On the other hand the only reason I was able to test out so easily out of so many lessons is the fact I already spent 5 years on Duolingo. Right now it feels a bit overpowered but once I get everything up to level 5 I'll just go back to regular lessons and strengthening weak skills like I've been doing for most of the last 4 years since I finished the Spanish tree.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew222058

As of yesterday or today it appears doing the test outs only give 20xp regardless of how many exercises you may have completed at that particular crown level

March 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaz816144

I agree with this. Kind of sucks because I'm still putting forth the work and getting less XP for it. If I know the course well enough to pass from 4 to 5 with a single test then I deserve the XP for that level.

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Andrew222058
Or maybe you are one of the last people to notice this. You aren't telling me anything that I didn't already know last week.

Edit: Maybe somebody can tell you where to find a thread about this topic. This thread seems to fit your topic.

"Test-out is pretty OP"

March 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew222058

Sounds like you need to lift your bonnet and let it go !

March 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

I see the possibility of that interpretation. If my post would have been written in a different way, then that interpretation would not be an option. I guess I need to write better posts.

Anyway, your interpretation is not reality. The alternative is that I was not expressing a pejorative view. And neither was I projecting the same. This is an interesting perspective, if you are interested in the truth.

But I realize that everyone is free to imagine what they like. And some people like first impressions.

March 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Kelk
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I don't see a problem with this, if you rush the tests on any languages you're not ready for, you're only cheating yourself. I speak Portuguese at a high level and just rushed through a number of the tests because it was pointless grinding away at the lower stuff. In Russian on the other hand, I wouldn't even attempt this, and slowly slog my way through the lessons one by one.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GreenAM
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Me too. I have finished my French and reverse French trees some time ago. Although I appreciate the practice, I also don't like constantly practicing the basic skills that I already know. That is why I discontinued my use of TinyCards here and why I chose DL over Memrise. On the other hand, I plan to go through the individual lessons in my Esperanto and Spanish trees since I'm only partially through them. (And my Spanish tree just updated today, which makes me happy.)

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

I nearly completed the Spanish tree a year ago (with my other account.) I had left only two lessons.

I like the new test out features so I can skip all the say stuff and focus more on things I need to practice.

I have no problem with earning a lot of XPs. I don't focus much on them. -- they are what they are.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
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My point isn't that you shouldn't be doing the tests. My point is you receive a ton of xp for not much work. It's good that you're able to test out and advance.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Kelk
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And I disagree with your point. From my perspective, points shouldn't just reflect your capacity for doing repetitive work, but for what you know. They should also somewhat indicate how well you have actually learned a language.

I already speak a few languages but want to improve them, and it is a waste of time for me to repeatedly do the "I am a man, she is a woman" lessons over and over. DuoLingo is not a contest, you progress for yourself. The crown system otherwise forces you to do up to 100 lesson repetitions for some of the topics, which is unnecessary for some people. I use DuoLingo to learn and practice languages, not for imaginary internet points.

As for "you haven't learned anything," the only way you're passing the test-out parts without knowing your stuff is cheating, so what's the point then anyhow? I could blast my way through Russian with the help of Google Translate, learn nothing, and get points the same way.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MasterZsword

I don't know if that would apply to people who already have a great grasp of the language (like me with French).

If I am doing a lesson where I may not have a good grasp of the topic, I normally complete the lessons as they come. If by doing that I have a better understanding of the topic, I will test-out. In that sense, I have made myself learn something and I am testing my knowledge. I try to get practice in before testing out. It's overpowered if you are sincerely cheating yourself by testing out without really knowing what's going on in the lessons.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/hanspersson
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You get the points for having done the work already, possibly elsewhere.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EdBaker9
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I found it too simple to just use the key feature to bypass levels. But decided to test myself before using it. Do five lessons, if I get them all without error, then I will use the key to bypass that level.

But since I just got the new Spanish course, I have a lot of level 0 and level 1, they only have four lessons.. so what the heck, do them without testing out. Doesn't take much extra time.

There is always going to be a way to cheat the system, but it doesn't mean anything if you get to level 25 in days if you don't know any of it. I've already got my level 25, doing it all again (new tree) for the personal language growth. As far as I know, no new badge to brag about.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/scarcerer
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On one hand, I feel it has devalued the higher levels significantly, not that they ever had any concrete value. But they used to be a symbol of a lot of hardwork. I had gathered almost 21K XP after actively studying Spanish here for a year or two and gilding a fully degraded tree a couple of times. Now I returned for the first time after the levels were introduced and gained 1K XP from the first two and a half skills, mostly using test out. It seems like you don't even have to get halfway through the tree to achieve level 25 if all your skills are at level 5.

Of course, if you do go the long way it's still the same amount of work required, even if you aren't as advanced. But when the levels don't seem to get that much harder (you're still mostly translating to L1 with a couple of multiple choice questions at level 5), testing out of them feels too easy.

Now on the other hand, wasn't level 25 fairly meaningless during the Immersion years as well? Anyone was able to go there and use Google Translate or Duobot to translate and get XP fairly quickly, regardless of their actual skill level, especially if they had a couple of friends or sockpuppets upvoting their translations.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
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Yes, I'm glad Immersion was revamped. I'm also sad that it went away. It was a great learning tool (and also very broken).

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ExSquaredOver2
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If the tests are hard enough, you should be rewarded.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Anu504702

hi..i think the test out feature is pretty easy..also the same question is repeated twice or thrice in the same exercise. Can feedback be given to Duolingo for the same?

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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You can submit a bug report.

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Yradnegel

Indeed, I think getting 240 XP for doing "Basics 1" twice feels like a bit of a cheat, as if I just plugged my Game Genie into Duolingo. Of course it wouldn't be much of a cheat for my brain since I already know all of the words, but my interpretation of the feature is that it's just a way for people that have long since memorized the material to quickly get to level 5, which I have no problem with. Not saying it should just give 10 XP or anything but perhaps a bit less than 150. Maybe somewhere in the 20-50 range would be a sweet spot? Besides that I love the feature, I much prefer it to doing translations I'm already extremely familiar with dozens of times.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/siciIy
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i don't agree that it's a "cheat." like ian.kelk said - if you use the test out feature to gild a lesson or even finish the entire tree without actually learning any of it, you're not cheating anything or anybody but yourself.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
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If you skimp out on any language learning you're cheating yourself. But Duolingo is gameified, so while you're not only cheating yourself, you're also cheating the system.

Although cheating is also incorrect in the context of gaming. Exploiting is a more accurate term.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vascotuga251

I don't know what to say about this really. I love the fact we can jump to level 5 and I like to see the amount of XPs being thrown at me but when I realised I was already level 25 in Spanish I became kind of balanced between if it's good to see all the XP or not.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PatSchiebz226
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I like the idea. I came to Duolingo with a pretty good understanding of Norwegian, and now I can test out of skills that I’m already good at.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@PatSchiebz226
Also to interested readers:

Testing Out

You like the idea. But I hate the idea.

The introduction of testing out resulted in a Win / Lose outcome.

The people who test out are the winners of the deal because they feel better. Their ego receives a boost. They find meaning in testing out.

Most of these people are blind (to some degree) to the cost of testing out. If Duolingo would try to fix the testing out process, then it would feasibly be possible to test out without cost in the future. But currently, nobody can test out of Duolingo exercises without cost.

Whenever the proponents of testing out notice that there is a cost to testing out, they discount the cost in their own minds. (In contrast, the people who realize the cost are the people who refuse to test out.) The proponents of testing out believe the glass is half full and some even believe it is completely full !!!

The Duolingo XP system is the principal loser of the deal (free XPs are given to undeserving recipients). But not the only loser. The language course loses. Duolingo loses. Every Duolingo student loses.

October 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

What is the cost that you are referring to?

I have been testing out for many lessons. I perceive no cost.

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda934586

Duolingo looks different today - July 4th - than it did yesterday. All the "5" levels that I had on many topics are gone! I'm going through and doing some of the tests (which my daughter told me about) and there is new content on there - for example sandwich in Spanish was "emparedado" and is now "sandwich". Also, new words that I'm sure weren't introduced before. I practice duolingo everyday. Were we supposed to know that something new was happening??

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Decktor
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That's the new Spanish tree, most people had it for some time now. If you look further down the tree you'll notice most of the lessons you already had aren't gone, Duolingo simply added 60 new lessons and most of then are at the beginning of the tree.

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Linda934586
Your so-called "5" levels were actually "1" levels. But the color of Level 1 changed from gold to blue at the time of the implementation of the new Spanish tree. And some of the L1 skill sets in the individual trees of specific individuals were immediately upgraded to L2 (green) or L3 (red) at the time of implementation of the new tree.

The implementation of the new Spanish tree took you (and many other people) by surprise. Those of us who knew in advance were reading the forum. Others learned the news from their fellow Spanish club members.

October 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/katherinekemp3

I just love the test out feature. I was just about to quit the boring system when the key arrived!! Genius, I don't care which level I receive, I just want to have fun and to learn more without being bored!! Love it..Thanks Duolingo

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

As a native English (UK) speaker I don't know what "testing out" means

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve254604
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It’s not an English issue; just a matter of terminology — I believe he’s mainly referring to the new-ish “key” function, or “Test Out of These [#] Skills” 2.0, rebooted for the “crowns” era.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

As someone interested in language, is it an americanism Is the term used in schools, is that where it comes from? When I started duolingoing recently I didn't have the time to go and find out what this meant, or why I would want to collect crowns, or what xp means, I am not really interested in "buying" virtual goods either for that matter. I don't have anything but praise for the Duolingo system, I spend spare time clicking on the adds to increase duolingo's viability and don't have any spare time left to figure out why I would want a l lingot, and so, what is "testing out"? :)

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

I don't believe it is an "Americanism" used in schools very commonly. (That is, I don't believe that the action of "testing out" is very commonly use.)

For example, in theory, a student in college might be able to "test out" of a particular course.

But where that option has been available, I have seen very few "takers."

("Testing out" refers to taking a test in lieu of taking a class or lesson, and receiving credit for the course. "Placement exams" allow students to avoid lower level courses and be placed in higher level courses. But students do NOT receive credit for those lower level course. -- This is different from "testing out" and receiving credit.)

Advanced Placement (AP) students attempt to "test out" of some college courses by scoring highly enough on the AP exam. But most American high school students do not take AP courses, and, hence, do not take the AP exam. (The Advanced Placement course and exam is a different mechanism from "testing out" and the "placement exam.")

I haven't heard of "testing out" being available to high school students wanting to avoid taking HS courses.

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

Thanks!

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@ieXEZn2E
Also to interested readers:

quote by ieXEZn2E from three months ago:
...When I started duolingoing recently I didn't have the time to go and find out what this meant... ....and so, what is "testing out"? :)
unquote

During the last three months, have you managed to learn what testing-out is?

If the reader cannot answer the following question, then you don't know what this forum thread is about. But don't feel bad if you don't know. You aren't alone.

In the context of Duolingo, what is testing-out?

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

I'm not sure what point you are trying to make. hay ho, "what a piece of work is man" indeed :)

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@ieXEZn2E
I don't know what you want me to clarify. I did not intend to write a cryptic post. If you are imagining that there is a hidden meaning or a hidden message that is hiding in my most recent post, then you are probably seeing something that I am not aware of.

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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What's the British term for this concept (assuming you've figured out what's being referred to), out of curiosity?

In the U.S. it's common, for example, to "test out of" intro language classes upon starting college because of background from high school, etc.

EDIT: seeing your comment of about an hour ago (hadn't refreshed the page), I can further clarify. When starting college there are things called "placement tests," probably most common for math, writing, and foreign languages. They're designed to ascertain what level of a course sequence would be most appropriate for any given student. If a student does well enough, they may be exempted from a certain course requirement and/or placed into a higher level class. This "doing well enough" is "testing out." There are also a whole series of exams high schoolers can take to exempt them from any number of intro college classes. Score high enough, and you can get college credit. I think I'd apply the term "testing out" there, too. Overall, it's fulfilling something via a test rather than coursework, or in this case, Duolingo lessons.

Had no idea this term wasn't universal throughout the English speaking world, but education vocabulary differing so markedly for so many things, I suppose I shouldn't be surprised.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ieXEZn2E

Many thanks for clarifying, I had sort of come to understand that from Duolingo but wanted to know who used the phrase and when. That is a fantastic system, my young relative dropped out of higher education (university) . For the whole of the first year the course repeated school work he was way ahead of (having such an interest in computers he had also self taught), when he started the second year and the course was still trying to get students at the "same level" by touching on subjects covered in secondary school (12 to 18 yrs) (this wasn't peculiar to him, lots of students complained of this) anyway, he decided he wasn't going to waste any more of his parents money! He walked straight into an IT job, not based on the fact that he had good self taught IT skills, but because the employer saw that he had completed part of a degree course and wanted a junior (he wasn't going to play down the degree course and possibly do himself out of a job!). I did "test out" for my higher education many years ago, we referred to it as "sitting an entrance exam" - as far as I am aware this is an unusual situation (both then and now) it came about because they could not fill the science course they were running (lucky me) . Most education establishments seem to insist on working through every single level and then sitting the test to move "up" to the next level :( long tedious situation for anyone with the inclination/interest to have self taught!

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/katherinekemp3

I arrived at level 25 in Italian when the system was changed. If I had to do 40 basic Italian lessons to go on, I would be bored to death and would probably not continue with Duolingo! I like the new system, I can quickly finish the things I already know and concentrate on the more difficult areas for as long as I want to. Thanks, Duolingo!!

October 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Panzerswine

I tested out and got 20 xp

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/HirundoPrima
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Well, the XP and the level are supposed to show the strenght of your knowledge in that language. If you can test out of a lot of skills, then your knowledge is quite good already (maybe based on learning outside Duolingo), so your stats should show that.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
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If you slightly reinterpret what level means to be language level rather than amount of work put in on DL, then this actually makes sense - your friend was only being displayed as level 13 instead of 18 because they hadn't gone through the tedium. But now their level more accurately represents their mastery of the material.

For what it's worth, XP has always been a little fishy - timed practice could give you ~double (it varied over time) the XP you got from a standard review, and, more dramatically, Immersion let some people earn obscenely large amounts of XP - amounts that put testing out to shame by about an order of magnitude.

July 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

Here is the only right interpretration of the concept of language level:

language level should not = XP !!

The real truth is...
language level ≠ XP

When we look around and we see that insanity is the rule, what do we do? Have you noticed? I see what we do. We are influenced by the corruption. We like to rationalize.

If XP is broken, isn't this a reason to fix it? You might think so. I might think so. But some other people have other ideas. Instead of fixing the problems, some of us prefer to embrace the dysfunctional system and some try to build monuments (idols) to worship.

October 27, 2018
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