"Tomamos el desayuno en la cocina."

Translation:We have breakfast in the kitchen.

5 months ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/spiceyokooko
spiceyokooko
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You used the wrong word. We eat brekky in the kitchen.

What the...?

LOL

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonathan.K1128
Jonathan.K1128
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That's Aussies for you haha

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

¿Por qué la respuesta correcta no es 'Tenemos el desayuno en la cocina'?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elvolcanchapin

It actually should be 'Desayunamos en la cocina', but apparently you can use tomar here and that's what Duo was looking for? idk, after 2 years in Guatemala among MANY nationalities and advanced spanish lit classes after, I have never heard that said or even written.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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I am interested in whether Spanish has changed. Fifty years ago, my h.s. Spanish teacher taught "tomar" = "to eat.," generally. Now, at least among DL students, there seems to be some question about using "tomar" even for "to have something to eat or drink." Would a native Spanish-speaker please take a second to straighten me out?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

I'm not a native Spanish speaker but I agree.
Tomar is used to mean to take internally--it can mean eat or drink.
Duo accepts that for this sentence.
I wrote: "We eat breakfast in the kitchen."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trisha-da-Fisha

Why isn't "We eat breakfast in the kitchen" correct?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
Scott31461
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I think "comemos" would need to be in the sentence for "eat".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

"Tomar" can be used to mean "to eat" or "to drink".
Words are complicated and often used in real life in surprising ways.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eakeator

It accepted that answer for me...

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

It is accepted now--10/30/2018!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian651321

How can "el " translate as " our" ?!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Livione97
Livione97
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The verb implies who is doing it, "tomamos", so we are, so it is our breakfast. I don't know the specifics, so this will have to do until someone who speaks spanish a lot better than me will explain this.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZackReagin
ZackReagin
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In Spanish and many other languages, it is much less common to state possession, and it is often implied by the context. For example, if you wanted to say "my arm hurts" in Spanish, you would say "me duele el brazo" (literally "the arm hurts me") rather than "me duele mi brazo".

When translating from one language to another, you often have to translate the sentence as a whole rather than each individual word, and not everything always has a single, perfect translation. In the sentence for this exercise, "our breakfast" is one possible translation, but you could just as easily translate it as "the breakfast", or even just "breakfast".

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaudiaRin876139

Jajaja... "our" ??? No dice "NUESTRO" desayuno.... dice "EL desayuno".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatPavi

Exactamente!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmigomikeyB

Tomar, to consume! We consume breakfast in the morning.......I think

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MehrSh
MehrSh
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Where is the "our" exactly???

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZackReagin
ZackReagin
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The use of possessive adjectives (i.e. "our", "my", "her") is much less common in Spanish than it is in English. While we have a tendency to use "our" in English to make it clear that something is owned by us, in Spanish, ownership is often implied by context rather than directly stated.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jetblackmoon

I'm confused on why we use "Tomamos" here vs "Tenemos". I'm reading through the comments seeing people say "tomar = to eat", which already doesn't make sense to me, as I thought tomar means to take, and comer means to eat.

Even if I'm missing something and tomar does mean to eat in this scenario, the word "eat" is nowhere in the sentence i was supposed to be translating, which was, "We have breakfast in the kitchen."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChavGreen

Same question. Previously, ‘tomar’ was used in ‘tomar el autobus’, so in my mind it was registered as ‘to take.’ Pretty confusing now

1 week ago
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