"Ayer nosotros pasamos una hora en la playa."

Translation:Yesterday we spent an hour on the beach.

3 months ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ken40203

In English, it's acceptable to say "... we passed an hour ..." somewhere or doing something. For me, a native English speaker, it's equivalent to saying "... we spent an hour ...". I think "... we passed an hour..." should be accepted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShannonSha500852

I've never heard that in English

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken40203

I googled it, and here’s an example from an English classic (first sentence): http://www.literaturepage.com/read/scarletletter-122.html

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.vance

it's technically correct to say "we passed an hour" in English but at least in the U.S., we will always say "we spent an hour". People will understand what you're saying but also realize that you aren't a native speaker if you say "we passed an hour".

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

I also see nothing really wrong with "passed an hour". Especially since DL usually prefers more literal translations. However, "spent an hour" is definitely better English.
I just worry some will try to use "gastar" for this sentence.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Don't confuse the "literal" translation with the cognate. Usually the cognate is best, but not always.

"Pasar" has several "literal translations." These include: pass, happen, to cross, meet, go through (suffer), to miss (not notice), to become inedible, to fade, to spend, to overdo.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/pasar

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Literal translation does not mean it sounds or looks like! Pasar, hmm, most like "pass". Of course this is useful way of guessing a word you don't know as Spanish and English have many cognates but it's not the criterion for closest translation. Easy to led astray. Volver oh that's like revolve; recordar obvs record....

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brent713454

I agree, "Yesterday we passed an hour on the beach", should definately be accepted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

There are common English phrases that use "pass" to express the passage of time. While I personally don't think this particular sentence is a great candidate for that usage, it raises my hackles whenever I see people assert that "no English speaker" would ever say something that's perfectly good English. So, I won't argue against "pass" here.

I do think it's good to recognize that when we talk of spending time doing anything, the Spanish verb is pasar. As long as you don't make the mistake that mathchoo described (of using gastar), we'll all get along.

As a related aside, there is an allied verb to talk about spending time in a different way, tardar. I find the usage of these two (pasar and tardar) to talk about time slipping by to be really fascinating. You typically use pasar to talk about spending time doing something you enjoy and use tardar to talk about spending time doing something that holds you up. Even if you aren't familiar with the verb tardar, you will instantly see a connection to tarde. I think that's pretty cool.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

PASAR = TO SPEND (TIME) ALSO WITH OTHER TRANSLATIONS YOU SHOULD STUDY ON YOUR OWN.

2 months ago
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