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  5. "SuD qamDaj 'ej Hurgh."

"SuD qamDaj 'ej Hurgh."

Translation:Its foot is dark blue.

July 6, 2018

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max_Matthews

Is Hurgh SuD a more abtract color such as purple?

October 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

Hurgh and SuD are both verbs, so you can't put them in the same sentence without some sort of marker to connect them. SuD 'ej Hurgh generally refers to the darker end of the "cool" spectrum - what we might call "dark blue". There is a theory that klingons cannot see purple, or at least cannot perceive it as a single color and the only way we have to describe it is Doq 'ej SuD.

October 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcmisher

If that's true, that means that Klingons are color blind - they must either have deuteranopia or deuteranomaly!

May 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

Those terms refer to very specific kinds of color blindness. It might be possible that some Klingons have that kind of color blindness, but if it's true that they can't see purple, that would be a different kind of color blindness.

May 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Those terms refer to very specific kinds of color blindness.

Specifically, to ones relevant to human eye components and their typical receptive frequencies.

May 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qov-jIH-je

Not so much colour blind as just having developed vision in a different spectral range. In one of the novels, I think it's Pawns and Symbols, a DIvI' crew discovers that Klingons can't see red. A Klingon enters a restricted area and doesn't understand how he was supposed to know that a plain black door designated restricted. The signage was black on red. In the novel, the Klingon can see two colours into the ultraviolet, colours he calls kalish and amarklor. Either way, it's a difference not a deficiency. Neither the gymnast who can't deadlift double her weight, nor the powerlifter who can't do a back walkover on a balance beam is physically inept.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmcowan

That novel has been contradicted by more recent canon, by the way. Klingon for the Galactic Traveler says, "The fact that neither SuD nor Doq includes what is called ‘violet’ or ‘purple’ in Federation Standard may be related to Klingon physiology—that is, exactly how the Klingon eye processes different wavelengths of light," suggesting that Klingon vision might be skewed the other way (especially since Klingons DO have words for both 'red' and 'black').

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeGOgletree

Maybe he has frostbite. I hope not.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kahless62003

Maybe the guys putting this together have a one-track-mind.

July 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Those are bright blue, though.

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeGOgletree

Of course they do. It can't be easy.

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TARDISToni

Technically, SuD 'ej Hurgh could also mean 'dark green', I would think. When the basic color terms are this vague, the terms for dark blue and dark green are not necessarily mutually exclusive.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"dark green" is also accepted.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TARDISToni

Yes, it is an accepted translation. That comment may have seemed a bit redundant and/or out of left field, but if one is going strictly off the "best," or default, course sentence translations alone (and not reading the comments), one could easily get the idea that SuD predominantly means "blue," when really, that isn't correct: it means all cool colors - blue, green, yellow, and everything in between - equally. That's the point I was trying to make.

It would be interesting, at this point in the course, to come across a sentence like "the book isn't blue, it's green." :-) In order to get that idea across, I understand we'd have to use similes, saying something like (let's see if I can get the grammar and word order correct) SuDbe' paq chal rur; SuD 'oH tI rur, but chal and tI aren't words we've learned yet, so it wouldn't really be possible to introduce such a sentence without it being very confusing. But, I think you see my point. The colors can be a difficult concept to grasp.

January 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qov-jIH-je

Russian has two basic colour names that divide the colour space we call blue. If you call something синий but it's actually голубой, you're as wrong as if you said a blue thing was green, but in English if you call something "blue," no one is going to say "no, it's light blue" because everyone understands that light blue is a subset of blue. SuD 'ej wov is a subset of SuD and if you're a Klingon web designer you can pull out whatever the Klingon retina makes equivalent to RGB, values to further refine the colour. But a Klingon visiting Earth might compliment us on the multitudinous "blues" of our planet: jul SuD, magh SuD, bIQ'a' SuD, Deb SuD, chal SuD je. yuQ SuD ponglu'.

September 6, 2019
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