"Comencélauniversidadhacedosaños."

Translation:I started college two years ago.

6 months ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Singingypsy

I started at the university is wrong... so la universidad must mean college, which I would think they could use the word colegio, but even google says that Universidad means college. Frustrating when we learn it one way and it also means something else that we get dinged on later.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

But "colegio" can mean any school not just college.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TPOinNC

In Colombia and at least some other parts of South America colegio refers to high school.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

That is what I was taught a long time ago.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgorZinenko
IgorZinenko
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Started what? Building, studying, working... College

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

¡punto bueno!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TPOinNC

at what point did DL stop translating universidad as university and only as college? In english the difference between the two has long since been forgotten (granting of degrees beyond a baccalaureate) and they're synonymous. I'm 2/3 the way through the Spanish course and this is the first time I've seen it.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kitchendesigner

Help me out here someone!! Why isn't "commence la universidad..." I started the university....?? As in, founded it? Wouldn't I started at the university be "Comence EN la univerisdad"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

That's a good question. I don't think you would use comenzar in that way. Rather, I think you'd use a verb closer to "found" like crear, fundar, formar, etc.

I'm not 100% certain about common usage among Spanish speakers. I base my assertion on the formal definition of comenzar (and empezar) here.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alison647221

Agreed

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

There is (again) something to say about this 'sloppy' language. 1: "la universidad" is not "a college" 2: In the 'correct' translation there is "...at the university", which seems correct. BUT that is NOT what the Spanish text says. Maybe the casual set of words is correctly understood somewhere in America, but in Europe we get laughs about it. Some accuracy would be nice and needed.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Duo is primarily oriented to American English and Latin American Spanish. This can cause some confusion when the same words are used differently across the entire English and Spanish speaking worlds.

In the US, there is absolutely nothing casual or oddly regional about using "college" to mean schools within a university. You are free to snicker all you want, but I think you would be better served to understand these distinctions and expand your knowledge of the world beyond continental Europe.

More to the point, both the Spanish and the English translation are correct from the point of view of the Americas. American English speakers run into the opposite problem when they see colegio, which we assume must mean "college" in our sense of the word. Likewise, many of us initially think futbol means (American) football. Hopefully, learning a language broadens our horizons more than it collapses them.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jemkent

I have The same answer

6 months ago
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