"Señora,¡bebaestevinotinto!"

Translation:Ma'am, drink this red wine!

6 months ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chuckdumas

An unexpected introduction to the Imperative tense. beba

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivor810183
Ivor810183
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I wondered what that was. I thought it was a mistake. Thanks for the info.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greenmillie64

Did you find out? Why use beba here, I dont understand

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EquanimousLingo
EquanimousLingoPlus
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The ir and er endings are changed to -a when using the imperative.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gmeym

This is a command, so you want to use the imperative form. Look at the help for this lesson.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEmood
TheEmood
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it's because with usted commands, you take the yo form, which is bebo, drop the o, beb, and add the opposite vowel (in this case a), so you get beba

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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For an affirmative command, can't you simply change the ending vowel of the third person singular? That would be ar verbs to e and er and ir verbs to a. (Bebe to beba, habla to hable, escribe to escriba.)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GranBocadillo
GranBocadillo
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yes that is correct, an easy way to conjugation almost all commands for tú and usted is like so,

IR/ER
Usted: take the usted form in the indicative, and change the ending to an a
Tú: take the usted form in the indicative

AR
Usted: take the usted form in the indicative and change the ending to an e
Tú: take the usted form in the indicative

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob46196
Bob46196
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It bothers me a bit that with these commands using Señora, Señorita and Señora, they seem so abrupt and even rude in the English translation. In a situation like this, we'd say something like: "Ma'am, would you like to try this red wine?" Do any fluent Spanish speakers know if the use of a formal title in Spanish like Señora automatically makes the sentence polite even if it's said in a way that would seem somewhat rude in English?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheBookKeeper06
TheBookKeeper06
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I believe that it is just as commanding. Even in Spanish, this sentence makes me feel uncomfortable. I agree with you, it does sound rude. It makes me think of those people at the mall that are always trying to sell you things.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Even in Spanish, this sentence makes me feel uncomfortable.

It's not just this sentence though, there are many other examples of imperative mood being used in a rather strange way, this whole request unit should be redone in my opinion.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Helen208222

...or a society that has a big problem with pushing alcohol on people!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

Was this comment needed? Really???

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Griffen__

Sometimes I like to be abrupt and rude, so it's good to have options on what to say. It'll be especially useful at wine festivals.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woa7dSD5
woa7dSD5
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It depends on the context. If I'm at at winery tasting, it's natural for the server to present a new wine and say something like, "now try this red wine."

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cKf1r

Agreed...it sounds like she has no choice!

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arin.Gudmundson

Can we please get some consistency on what Senorita translates to? Half of them mark wrong for Miss and half mark wrong for Madam. Its super annoying.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ivor810183
Ivor810183
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I always put miss for senorita and madam for senora and it gets marked correct.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

Same here.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnieHayd

For me, I use miss for señorita and ma'am for señora and they are always accepted. Gracias!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

i agree. it's a complete mess.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertDuke

I don't think of tinto as red... like rojo

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob46196
Bob46196
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In Spanish, red wine is always referred to as vino tinto, not vino rojo. Just one of those language quirks. However, a waiter would understand what you meant if you said vino rojo.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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If they are used to dealing with foreigners, maybe.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Greenmillie64

Someone please explain the use of Beba here. Thank you

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob46196
Bob46196
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I'm guessing you asking why it isn't "bebe". This is the imperative (or command) form, and in Spanish this means changes in the verb ending from the normal present. To make it even more complicated, the negative imperative and affirmative imperative also can change the endings. See here: http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/beber.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fillmoe
Fillmoe
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Wondering when to use beber or tomar. I've seen both used for "drink"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriNelson7

There was just a sentence on duolingo, Senora, pruebe este pastel! Why is there a difference in using the A and E in beba and pruebe

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob46196
Bob46196
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They are different because one is an ar verb, probar, and the other is an er verb, beber. If the usted form uses an e ending in the present, then it will use an a ending in the imperative, and the reverse happens if it uses an a ending in the present. Also, ir verbs like vivir do the same thing: present vive, so imperative viva. This only works for the usted form though, and then there are the irregular verbs, e.g. decir is dice in the present and di in the imperative.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

I believe they were talking about the difference between bebe/beba and prueba/pruebe.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriNelson7

Thank you, yes. I'm confused when -a or -e is used when the sentence is a command.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

The trick is that it is the opposite of the regular form. If the regular conjugated verb end in -a, then the command form is -e. Likewise, if the regular conjugated verb ends in -e, the command form ends in -a.

Hopefully that helps a little bit better.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriNelson7

Thank you so much. It makes sense now.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UN1C0RN2

Beba and pruebe are the command forms. You're not just requesting they drink or try something. You're demanding it, they have to. It is a non-negotiable imperative.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dianneja

Tinto really means pink?

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob46196
Bob46196
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No, when it is used with vino, it just means red wine. As a color, it can also mean dark red or burgundy. In a few south American countries, it can also mean a black coffee.

5 days ago
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