https://www.duolingo.com/NavleloShake

Meaning of "var ol"?

Hi, I'm just wondering if there are any Turkish speakers here who can explain the meaning of the expression 'var ol'?

I know that "var" means something along the lines of 'there is/are', and fills approximately the same function as the Spanish 'hay'. I also know that 'ol' can be used as 'be', e.g. 'sakin ol' = 'be calm'/'calm down'.

I was just watching Kelebeğin Rüyası (which I can definitely recommend to Turkish learners, it's on netflix), set in the tek parti dönemi, and in the background I saw posters that read 'Var ol İnönü'. I'm assuming it's some kind of political slogan, but just can't understand what it means. I, with my very limited Turkish knowledge, would've assumed it meant 'There is İnönü' or 'İnönü exists', but now that would just be a really, really bad slogan. I'd greatly appreciate any and all help. :)

July 8, 2018

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dunderlad

It is understandable that you have found it confusing, I'll try to explain.

Essentially it is more of a fixed expression so it can be confusing.

Literally translated, the expression "Var ol" means "Exist".

However what is usually meant by this phrase is "Glad you exist" or "Hope you keep existing".

Esentially, the phrase "Var ol" is mostly used to informally show gratitude.

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NavleloShake

Alright, I think I understand. So it sounds almost like an alternate way of saying 'yaşa' or 'yaşasın', then? And in the example I used, a possible translation could possibly be simply 'long live İnönü'? Thank you for clearing it up :)

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/dunderlad

Yes that translation is also correct. It's just a fixed phrase really so any meaning along the lines of such are perfectly fine :)

July 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/.BlueBooks.
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I love Kelebeğin Rüyası. It is about two poets and it reflects the that term very well.

'Var ol!' is like 'be alive!', 'keep staying here/with us', 'long live' etc.

'Çok yaşa' is also a common phrase for these cases. For instance: 'Kralımız çok yaşa!'

And here is an advertisement for Mother's Day: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO49T2Znk7o

P. S.: Çok yaşa is also used when someone sneezed. :)

July 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NavleloShake

Yes, me too, I've seen it twice, haha! And thanks for the help :)

July 10, 2018
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