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"Their bear is hungry."

Translation:Il loro orso ha fame.

March 27, 2013

72 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lizard.King

The interesting thing here is that in italian (as well as in spanish) hunger is not something to be but rather something to have...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allen_Sickle

You can BE hungry. It's: "I'm hungry" = "Sono affamato."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ksoo

Is there a difference in connotation or meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allen_Sickle

Not at all. It has the same meaning. Let's say that: "Ho fame." means LITERALLY "I have hunger." And "Sono affamato." means "I am hungry." However, "Ho fame." is more common than "Sono affamato". :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tapatio068

Yea! The same applies in Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.Rossetto

In Portuguese, French, German and allot of other languages too, tbh English is prob one of the few that doesnt accept this form


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaimec13

German too. "Ich habe Hunger" (but I think there's also 'hungrig'?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachael.cr3

And French - "j'ai faim"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexBassis

Yes, German has both expressions. And there also is a verb for it: "hungern" (to hunger)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ephil08

that's for wir und sie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikina

it's the infinitive. so it would be "wir hungern" and "sie hungern", but it's also the basic form of the verb and you can use it for any person and tense. "ich hungere", "du hungerst"... It doesn't mean exactly the same as "Ich habe Hunger"/"Ich bin hungrig" (which both mean "I'm hungry"). "hungern" is something quite serious and lasting usually, more like "to be famished" or "to famish"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yyq9bu

Dutch as well. "Ik heb honger"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plat_

Ich bin hungrig


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avel367925

I honestly had forgotten about it! My native language is spanish (I'm studying in english so I my skills don't fade), and normally I compare italian to spanish 'cause it's easier; but this time I got it completely wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ooneill

So to make loro possessive, we had il? So "Il loro" is "their," where "loro" is just "they?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2656

Not really, loro can be either: you can distinguish by the role in the sentence, as a personal pronoun is a noun while a possessive pronoun is an adjective. Possessives tend to go before the name they refer to, so they usually come after an article, if one is needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italylori

Thank you. Very helpful


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markdquist

Exactly the answer I was looking for. Mille grazie!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinahosny9

so we can write just loro without il loro and its correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda497180

No I just tried that. It was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaimec13

So 'the horse' is il cavallo, right? In English we would just say that it's 'their horse,' without adding 'the' in front of it again. It's not really important for us to do that because nouns don't really have (grammatical) genders. But since in Italian we have to specify that 'horse' is a masculine word, we stick 'the' into the possessive statement as well (or at least, that's my guess as to the reasoning behind this rule). 'Loro' means 'they' as a subject but it's also, apparently, a possessive adjective. So we just stick 'loro' in its assigned slot between the noun and the article (which helps to specify the gender of the noun). End result: 'il loro cavallo.'

(Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, I do NOT feel like an expert in Italian XD)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/banay

bah this one was tricky. i tried to do something with l'orso and loro, but didnt think i should break "l'orso" nice sentence anyway


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_GreenGiant_

One of the options to choose from was "Their bear has marmalade." I'm reminded of Padington.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominikWeb

If it is "l'orso", why isn't it "lo loro orso"? Isn't "l'" just an abbreviation of "lo"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2656

Yes, it is; however the article doesn't depend on the word it refers to, but literally on the following letters, e.g. "la montagna" but "l'alta montagna", "lo stadio" but "il nuovo stadio". Most adjectives would go after the noun, but for those that go before, like the possessives, you have to consider this as well :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sepidjoon

I think its not correct because Lo is used for the nouns only begin with Z, Y, X, PS, PN, GN But we use l only for the nouns that begin with vouwels. So there is a big different between them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slavich77

You can't escape from a bear this way... especially from a hungry one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarakD

Why is "Loro orso ha fame" incorrect? Isn't the il implied?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2656

Nope: in Italian you almost always have to use a definite article before a possessive adjective. A common exception is for singular and unmodified family members, but that doesn't apply to "loro" in any case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulZaia

why is it "ha fame" and not "è fame"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvv845522

Non si dice " il orso" ma " l'orso"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuiRebelo1

Reading the comments below, no one seemed to have noticed the fact that Duo finds it normal for a person to own a bear... Also, a hungry bear would eat its human.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doris47163

Where is the mistake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rajul285485

Does loro mean both 'they'and 'their?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeggyLMurr

loro....mean both they and their?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda497180

So many sentences you leave off the article. When do you know?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/srguiri

Il suo orso was what I was looking for too, but since Suo wasnt an option, loro seemed the obvious choice. I didnt precede it with Il so I flunked it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohxgU

Why 'ha' not 'e' for 'is'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatarupaBo1

"is hungry" should be "è fame", right? Then why did the answer gave ha fame?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewHan903854

I am learning Italian and am very new myself so could be wrong but from what I have learnt is you cannot be hungry in Italian you have to "have" hunger so the translation is not literal. We are translating English "is hungry" to Italian "have hunger" that's why it is "ha fame"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jd12386

why is this sentence correct (Il loro orso ha fame ) I put ( Il loro orso è fame and it said I was wrong why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allen_Sickle

Because in Italian you can't say "Lui è fame", but "Lui HA fame" ("He has hunger"). To use "è" you should write "Lui è affamato" ("affamato" = "hungry").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mauro.1964

Why is "Il loro orso è affamato" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexBassis

I find it strange that "loro orso" doesn't get contracted somehow. Italians seem so fond of shortening words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aileanaa

Sounds like someone's about to have a bad day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaiaChoat

Has anyone actually realized their bear is HUNGRY!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry631311

Orso starts with a vowel and ends with a vowel so should (the) =l' not il


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KholoudMoh935654

how it could that..e is verb 2 be ..and ha is verb to have


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fahad592014

Meaning is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lianne961647

Why does the bear "have hunger" when it reads "is hungry"? Ha instead of e?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrsMixMusic

Because, that's the way they form sentences. Remember, you are learning one of the oldest languages, which is latin based. They say things backwards sometimes as well. Don't try and match the words exactly to English. Good idea, look into the structure of Italian sentences, it may help. ie: "John's book" would be "the book of John" Il libro di John.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evan209993

Cant their also imply singular? Jim's bear is hungry: talking about Jim to someone else, their bear is hungry. Why isnt il suo orso ha fame accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackie996043

Why have you marked this wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilBergma1

The Il, is not required when talking normally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris323324

I lost my word " fame"! I just disappeared off the screen!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshua351139

I don't thing "the" should show ownership the the they sounds dumb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KLUSTENATOR

It's because someone keeps eating his porridge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaolinoSpecia

Il loro orso è affamato


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adamo363099

Loro orso ha fame is sufficient. They would not accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinaGolik

Can we say: Il loro orso e fame?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

No, it would be like "their bear is hunger".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda497180

I don't know what all the flags are for, followed by numbers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

It tells which level a person has reached with a certain language.

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