"You need to eat more fruits."

Translation:Usted tiene que comer más frutas.

4 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/.k.a.t.i.e.

Why is tiene and not necesita being used here?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiceyokooko
spiceyokooko
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Because it's using tener + que, which translates to 'have to'. It's explained here:

https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/tenque

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HommeRenoir
HommeRenoir
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As Chrizzy said, it should be "have to" then, not "need to". This sentence is wrong.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

necesitar and tener que can be used interchangeably in this sentence. If either is rejected, that should be reported to help expand the database for this exercise.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chrizzy26

Then why need to and not have ???

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john581308

"Need to" and "have to" are two different meanings

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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Is this the kind of need to where you wouldn't want to, but you really should? Because you don't literally have to eat more vegetables, but it is different from a need that is also a want like I need get a new cellphone.?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardWallace0

Necesitar can most definitely be used in this example. "Tú necesitas / Usted necesita comer más frutas" are valid translations and accepted here.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transkter
transkter
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Duolingo jumped the shark here. In a prior sentence they would not accept need to as a translation for tiene and i defended it because they are two different words and now Duolingo interchanges tiene with need.

They really need to work with native speakers in English more because while some things are colloquially interchangeable they still have technically different meanings so I think they should err on the side of precision rather than colloquialism.

They will never catch up with colloquial English because it constantly changes and it's different all over the world. What they can do is differentiate between words like have to and need to which are different. English people make all kinds of mistakes but they know what they mean where as in other languages word meanings don't change quite as readily.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
Scott31461
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Maybe because "You need to eat more fruit" and "You have to eat more fruit" are pretty much saying the same thing. If a doctor said either one to me I would take them as having the same meaning. But I can also see your point on being word-specific.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathy979841
Kathy979841
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I agree. In english the sentence should be you have to rather than you need to.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trumaine7

Ok i read the messages and. See why "necesito" isn't in this in a way but is there a rule why you put "tiene Que"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

First, you absolutely can use either necesitar or tener que to translate this sentence. There's no hidden subtlety or nuance that makes one better than the other. It's entirely possible that Duo chose this switch (using tener que with "need") to get us to be less mechanical. Note that there can be situations where tener que is a better choice than necesitar. This just isn't one of them.

Second, and to answer your question, the reason for adding que is probably historical more than logical. Usually with verbs that are more modal in nature (need, must, should, can, etc.) there is no intervening preposition. You just string the verbs together. With tener, however, you must insert que. It's just the way it works.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trumaine7

Lol alight.. That was a great explanation and did shed a lot on this.. 2 lingots for you lol

1 month ago
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