"You have to put on pants!"

Translation:¡Tienes que ponerte pantalones!

5 months ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SelvaPoder
SelvaPoder
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No me digas como vivir mi vida!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baramander
Baramander
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You will get arrested if you go out without your pants on

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Slagar1
Slagar1
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Is Duolingo trying to prepare me to be a parent? ¡Tienes que levantarte ahora y ponerte pantalones!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlofSanner

No, I think Duolingo is trying to make you act like an adult... ;-) They might have had an eye on you doing your spanish lessons ;-D

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

Pantalones - pants in general

Unos pantalones - some pants

Los pantalones - the pants

Just depends how you want to say it

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/uvnetter
uvnetter
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Why is it not ponerse?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nunya375947

It would be, if using "tiene que". But the informal "tienes" means to also use informal "te"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hans618161

Duo accepts both "Tienes que ... " and "Debes ..." Are they exactly the same ??

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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In outside learning I was taught tienes que = you have to, and debes = you should/ought: but duo does not accept should unless it is in the form deberías, and uses debes pretty much interchangeably with tienes que.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mph.vgc
mph.vgc
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why not "los pantalones"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKTaylor
JohnKTaylor
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"Los pantalones" would be referencing specific pants, and would translate to "the pants." Without "los" you are telling someone to put on pants - any pants.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mph.vgc
mph.vgc
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Thank you John for your input. It would be obvious in English, but not so in Spanish, where "nouns don't like to be alone". I have learned that we have to use definite articles "with parts of the body and clothing". You can read it here: http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100011/articles-definite# Any thoughts?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKTaylor
JohnKTaylor
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The article you posted is true, but doesn't cover every nuance.

wales46 gave a really good answer here in this discussion; I recommend you review it.

In the article you posted, they gave one example for clothing: "Tienes la falda muy bonita." In that case, "la falda" is referring to a specific skirt that a person is wearing. This is consistent with what I said in my earlier post and what wales46 said in his: the definite article is referring to a specific article of clothing. The original sentence for this exercise is referring to pants in general, and that is a nuance that wasn't addressed in the article you mentioned.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdbarber

I don't know, but it seems to me that there have been many instances where other sentences have been referring to objects in general and have still included the definite article.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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There is no comment from wales46 here. Perhaps it has been edited out.

I put "¡Tienes que ponerte los pantalones!"  on the grounds that articles are needed in Spanish, and I thought it was reasonable to assume that, by implication, it referred to your own pants and not someone else's.
DL marked it wrong but suggested "¡Tienes que ponerte vos pantalones!" . Is this wrong too?

Incidentally, I am confident that body parts use a definite article. Maybe this doesn't extend to clothing.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nigeldixon4

Exactly what I put.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen514825

Why not the Imperative ten que ponerte

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanGrin4

Duolingo wants literal translations, indeed my mom would go for your suggestion ;)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deb1134
Deb1134
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Duo uses exclamation points in imperative sentences in English to imply it is a command, not a suggestion.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cld50

Los pantalones ,los pantalones surely

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil712772

John, you can talk about nuances, refer to certain articles, websites, what-have-you till the cows come home, but in the end you have to deal with DL's haphazard way of doing things. One time they'll use los pantalones in a sentence, next time they'll drop the los, and I'm talking about same sentence structure, placement, situation.... all of the above. Use what you have to here to get to the next level, but do it the right way in real life! Entiendes?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanCarlos117153
JuanCarlos117153
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I am Spanish speaker. For me the sentence correct is: "tienes que ponerte los pantalones"

2 months ago
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