https://www.duolingo.com/Guzenko

Is danish worth it?

Hi,

I’m assuming that this question has been asked a lot, and I apologise if it has been. The reason I’m asking is getting responses which are not based off of an outdated version of the course.

Anyways, I am very keen on studying a new language on Duolingo and am struggling between choosing either Swedish or Danish. From what I’ve read, Danish is much harder in terms of pronounciations, which often make no sense when compared to what is written, Swedish on the other hand has been described as melodic and easy to learn. I am visiting Malmö and Copenhagen in early August and would like your input as to whether or not learning Danish would be more useful (putting into consideration the time and effort) than Swedish.

Responses from all types of Swedish/Danish learners and native speakers would be highly appreciated! :)

5 months ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jileha
Jileha
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Considering the shortness of time, I’d go with Swedish. The Danish pronunciation is definitely more difficult than the Swedish one. With Swedish, you can concentrate more on the grammar and vocabulary right from the start.

But apart from that, I enjoy Danish very much because of its pronunciation and I love the way it sounds. Maybe after your trip, you will have had enough exposure to both languages to decide if you want to continue learning one or the other.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guzenko

Great idea, it would be easier to determine which language to study after my trip, thank you!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaugeTholander
LaugeTholander
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If you're just visiting and not planning to live in Denmark (which I assume you don't), you're probably better off learning Swedish because of the easier pronunciation. Not kidding, I don't know a single Dane who doesn't speak English, and especially in Copenhagen, we are used to people not knowing our language. I think both languages are beautiful in their own ways, but you're visiting in under a month and to be honest, I don't think anyone can learn Danish in that amount of time. I'd say that Swedish is easier in some ways, so maybe go for that. Once you are fluent in Swedish, learning the other Nordic languages will be a lot easier as well.

But of course, it's 100% your decision, and I think you should do whatever feels right for you. Good luck :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guzenko

Yeah, I see what you mean, s Swedish would probably be the better option to begin with. Thank you for the response!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pmagnuson
pmagnuson
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Both, of course!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guzenko

Haha, if I ever find the time to do both simultaneously, I certainly will!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reza326657

I suggest danish

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/languagele469606

Loving learning the Danish language, but I have to agree with the other poster - I think that nearly all Danes, at least around Copenhagen, speak English. I've been to Copenhagen three times before I started learning Danish and I can't remember any places where English was not spoken and I think a lot of signs seemed to be in English (?) Also, I'm not sure you would get the same patient reaction trying to speak Danish to a Dane that you might receive say trying to speak Japanese in Japan but that may depend on where you are. I can't comment on what it might be like in Sweden in this regard. Also, many individuals you might encounter, for example working in restaurants, may not be a native Dane and may actually speak English better than Danish. I feel like if/when I return to Denmark, I will probably use more English than Danish even if I know how to say it in Danish!

That being said, I love learning Danish and it has definitely helped me be able to read some in Norwegian (my grandmother is of Norwegian descent and I recently joined a Norwegian-American organization in DC). The pronunciation is often different between Danish and Norwegian of course. Some of that makes it interesting for me though. I also watch Danish films so I wanted to learn Danish because of that. I think you should pick whichever language seems more exciting to you as that will keep you practicing!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justagirlonduo

Danish is pretty easy to learn regarding grammar. It's even simpler than English, but the pronunciation is a nightmare. I lived there for a year and studied it hard. I got the level where I could read books and magazines, but no one, and I mean no one, could understand me when I spoke. I struggle with some vowels in English when the word ends in 'l', for example, 'bull' and ball' and 'cool' and 'call'. The difference between these sounds is one of the mainstays of the language so I was sunk before I even started. The Danes like to get you to sat 'red porridge with cream' for sport as it has a lot of difficult sounds in, but it was their vowels in general I simply couldn't pronounce properly.

Plus most Danes speak English, and they are kind of intolerant of any variations of bad Danish accents and even most shop assistants will invariably reply to you with cutting, perfect English if you try to speak Danish to them. There are some lovely Danes, of course, (I married one!) but some seem to take pride in speaking as obtusely as possible so you can't understand them.

I know nothing of Swedish, so can't help you there. But I found Danish easy to learn thanks to its simple structure. It's a very minimalist language, with relatively few words. I've been told I'm not alone in being unable to speak it. I live in France now, and although the language is arguably more complex and is taking me longer than Danish to get to grips with, the folk here are a lot more tolerant of my dodgy accent and generally make a huge effort to understand me. I think it's because they are used to hearing bad accents, but the Danes aren't. If you're prepared to go all out, then do it, but I think 'a little bit of Danish' is generally useless

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LytjeDk
LytjeDk
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"If you're prepared to go all out, then do it, but I think 'a little bit of Danish' is generally useless"

I totally agree! Danish (and I believe the other scandinavian langauges, Dutch and probably a few more) isn't strictly needed, as very many people in these contries are comfortable talking in English. Obviously if you want to stay, if you want to work close with people, if theres is 'a special someone' who you want to impress etc. Then by all means, - go for it. If not, probably your time is spend better in other places.

As my name suggest (The DK part) my native tongue is Danish - and I live in Denmark.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xia267
Xia267
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Perhaps you should try both, since you are going to Malmö and Copenhagen.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Plexiate

Swedish for easier pronunciation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EarthMaster213

Danish is very worthwhile! it is pretty easy to learn and the pronunciations get easy once you get to listen to the language a bit. It was confusing for the first few days but I got the hang of it pretty quick. Also Danish and Swedish are very similar so if you chose Danish it would be easier to understand Swedish as it is an easier language and is derived from Danish. If you chose Swedish it would be harder to understand Danish as it is a harder language. If you choose danish with it being a very slight bit harder you will feel much more accomplished and people will be more impressed with a very tiny bit more work.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohannesBe321028

The Danish language is a north Germanic language. It has many cognates from English, like menu, taxi and chocolate. But the pronunciation may be a little more challenging for English speakers. I personally love this language.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/helrasincke
helrasincke
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Unfortunately, none of the examples you give are of Germanic origin. The first two are of French origin while the last is from Nahuatl via Spanish. Some more illustrative examples might be the nouns vindue window, sten stone, søster sister and the verbs have to have, komme to come and gå "to go, walk. There are many other common words including indtil until, igen again, allerede already, under under, nær near*.

4 months ago
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