"Mam dziewięć ciężkich dni w pracy."

Translation:I have nine tough days at work.

July 12, 2018

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stewart288923

It is quite normal in English to say 'heavy days' instead of hard days. Also this is the literal translation anyway!

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Pan.Daniel

Hi, I think it's okay, I use 'heavy day(s)' to mean I have lots of work to do.

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Okay, added then.

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

Nope, sorry, this is nonsense

July 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/cszerszen

Why is the masculine person form of czięki used here? Dzień is masc. inanimate.

September 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

"ciężki", you missed a letter :)

You only notice the difference between masculine animate and masculine inanimate in Accusative singular. Sure, "mam" takes Accusative, but "dziewięć", as most numerals, takes Genitive. So "ciężkich dni" is Genitive. Plus it's plural anyway.

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Philipp88107

I'm a bit confused. I don't know what this sentence could mean. How... I mean... were the last nine days at work tough or are the next nine days going to be tough? Or is it more like someone wrote his tough days down in a kalendarz and counts them after a while? And no. This is not meant to be a joking question. This sentence just makes no sense to me. Sorry.

April 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

If we were talking about nine days which are already over, I would expect the sentence to be in the past tense. I'd say that we're either currently in the middle of those days, or we are talking about the very near future.

April 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Philipp88107

Hmm.. I think I got the meaning. Thank you

April 9, 2019
Learn Polish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.