https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw

Spanish won't accept "coche" for "car"

  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 1962

The new Spanish from English lesson on travel only accepts "el carro" and not "el coche." So apparently Spanglish is good, but not actual Spanish! Frustratingly, there's no way to report it -- the only choice when you click "report" is "the word doesn't match the picture" or something like that. Any idea how to get this nonsense fixed? Thanks.

6 months ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

"Coche" should be accepted, please report it. But you are offending 80% of Spanish speakers by calling "carro" Spanglish. "Carro" is the actual Spanish name for cars in most countries, exceptions are Argentina, Chile, Equatorial Guinea, Spain and Uruguay. "Coche" is a dialectal term used by around 10% of speakers, in other countries it means "baby-cart" or "cart".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 1962

Oh, OK, I totally didn't know that! And as I wrote above, I can't report it the normal way. Does anyone know a different way to reach the moderators? Thanks.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

It is OK. If you wonder why "carro" and "car" are similar, it is because they come from Latin "carrus" (a wagon with 4 wheels).

Reporting has become more complicated now. You cannot report images, only sentences. Since "coche" is a right answer for dozens of sentences besides pictures, you should report it there.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 1962

Thanks for understanding and for educating me. Much appreciated. And that's a great idea -- hopefully it will come up in a context where I actually can make a report. Thanks!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vereschagin
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 19
  • 1007

Don’t feel bad. Up until the latest tree update Duolingo only referred to a car as “un coche.”

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carlosgarciaf

Hahaha I did get momentarily pissed without even noticing

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 338

Interesting. At least some Spaniards do call a car "coche." I learned that in school many, many years ago but forgot it.

I was just yesterday on a boat with a very nice man from Seville and we were having a long conversation. (We're both in a French-speaking country at the moment, and my Spanish is much better than my French, and his Spanish is better than his French or his English, so we lapsed at some point into speaking Spanish.) He was asking me questions and at some point he said coche and I had to remember that it means car. (I travel to Mexico much more often than I travel to Spain, so I'm more accustomed to saying "carro".) Apparently in Seville a car is always called "coche." We laughed about it for a while and talked about some of the differences between Spanish and Mexican.

You should report it. Coche means car, sin duda.

Also, FYI: carro ain't spanglish. Carro comes to Spanish from the portuguese word for cart, and ultimately from Latin. It does not come from the Gringo word for automobile.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

In Chile we say "auto", whereas "carro" and "coche" mean "carriage". A baby-carriage is a "coche" and a shopping-cart is a "carro".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 338

muy interesante. I'll try to remember that when I'm in Chile.

To be honest, I think that "baby-carriage" has gone out of use pretty much in US English. Nowadays, and even when my son was a baby, you could buy an umbrella stroller, a jogging stroller, a portable bassinet, a sling, a portable car seat, a front-loading papoose (called by yuppies a BABYBJÖRN), a baby backpack, and a carrier. I only see the term "baby carriage" on movies from about 1970 or before.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lizsue
  • 25
  • 25
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4

The impression I had was that "baby carriage" is for the ones where the baby lies flat and "stroller" is for the ones where the baby sits up. It seemed like the difference between "baby carriage" and "stroller" is like the difference between a bed and a chair. Of course, I could be wrong and this could vary from dialect to dialect!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angus390025
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 338

the bed-type carriage had almost completely gone out of use 20 years ago. More recently, they're back in fashion among some hispsters, who usually call them "pram" (although Amazon markets them under the names "urban baby stroller" and "classic stroller"). I know a couple who has one. Its appearance is very retro. Black and pointy. Looks like something you'd see on the set of Downton Abbey, except that under the black pointy parts modern gimmicks such as shocks and springs and bluetooth receivers are hidden.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceOM

In my childhood, babies were pushed around in baby buggies.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulguk
  • 19
  • 18
  • 9
  • 9

Pushchair and pram in British English.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Thanks. I'll keep in mind if I go to the US. I'll try with "stroller".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carlosgarciaf

You're totally right it should accept both! Fun fact, I had no idea coche was mainly used in Spain! In Mexico City, I heard and used coche and carro 50/50

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ComidaDeRaton

I second this

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCabra2

El coche is Spanish from Spain for car. El carro is the American version for car. Both are correct but, I have noticed a lot of Americanism in the programme.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonathanbost
  • 25
  • 24
  • 15
  • 12
  • 9
  • 9
  • 7
  • 856

As has been pointed out before, "carro" is not an "American version." It is a true Spanish word for "car," from the same Latin root, and is also a more widespread version of "car" than "coche."

6 months ago
Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.