"Sí, yo estoy un poco triste."

Translation:Yes, I am a little sad.

7 months ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dude578859

Aren't we all?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwesomelyHumble

A veces

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bob619930

I don't think the "yo" is needed in this because "estoy" mean "i am"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saunya4
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"Yo" before the verb can be used for emphasis. Also preference for use changes by culture. There are 22 countries that speak Spanish and many more dialects. So, yes, it can be said either way and still be correct.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ex3mity
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I agree...

There are more than 400 million native speakers of Spanish

There are many Spanish speaking countries in the world, as Spanish is the official language of the following 20 countries, as well as Puerto Rico: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Although it’s not an official language, Spanish is commonly spoken in the United States, Belize, Andorra and Gibraltar

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewDill10
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I'm having trouble understanding the difference between the "Estoy [emotion]" construction, and the "Me siento [emotion]" construction.

When using the verb "estar", you don't need the reflexive verb me/te/se/etc., but when using "sentir" you do. So is there a difference in the meanings of "Estoy triste" and "Me siento triste"? In English, "I'm sad" and "I feel sad" mean the same thing; is it different in Spanish?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Think of the "se" and "te" and "me," as meaning herself or himself, and yourself, and myself. These reflexive pronouns need to be included whenever a sentence is saying something in refernce to these things, even while, himself, herself, yourself, or myself, are not normally included in the English translation.

For example, "He feels happy," means, "He, himself, he feels happy." In a translation a "se" would be correspond with the "himself" in the more filled out sentence.

"Él se siente feliz."

""He, himself, he feels happy."

… which is generally said in English as being, "He is happy" This is kind of a cut down version of what is intended to be understood by a listener, which is: "He, himself, he feels happy."

There can a difference between what a sentence can basically mean and how it is normally said or translated.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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There is no very substantial difference between these expressions. "Me siento triste" sounds a bit more superficial and/or short-lived to me than saying "Estoy triste".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saunya4
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I believe that these phrases are interchangeable when talking about physical or mental conditions/states, just as in english. However, Sentir is always reflexive (ie sentirse) when followed by an adjective or adverb, but not when followed by a noun.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Does anyone else get screwed by auto-correct? Unpredictably, my auto-correct will change "yo" to "you". And that's not the only word it changes.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadySfb

You need to set your language to accept Spanish, otherwise it will consistently try to find the English word that is closest. It does mean it will occasionally send Spanish words mixed in with your messages to friends though, so keep your eyes peeled!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambo753

If you have a samsung android phone you may be able to swipe sideways the space bar to change the keyboard languages after you install Spanish on your on-screen keyboard settings.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

You can turn off autocorrect.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericashelton

Shouldn't it be "Sí, yo tengo un poco triste." I have always been taught to say tengo when reffering to certain adjectives like triste or frío

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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You cannot use tener with adjectives. If you're talking about experiencing some emotion or condition, use estar with adjectives, and tener with nouns. But note that it might not always match the English translation:

  • Tengo frío. - I am cold. (lit. "I have coldness.")
  • Tengo hambre. - I am hungry. (lit. "I have hunger.")
  • Tengo temor. - I am afriad. (lit. "I have fear.")
  • Tengo ira. - I am angry. (lit. "I have rage.")
  • Estoy triste. - I am sad.
  • Estoy frío. - I am (physically) cold. (Frío can be either an adjective or a noun.)
  • Estoy feliz. - I am happy.
  • Estoy enojado. - I am angry.
3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vikaskrishnan

What is the need for 'un' in the sentence? Poco is little (adjective) and triste is sad (adjective again). I thought un comes before nouns. Please clarify.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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Poco is not an adjective here, but an adverb. It modifies the adjective triste.

The un here has the same function as the "a" in English. It shifts the meaning from (a slightly weird) "little sad" (i.e. "less sad than expected") to "a little sad" (i.e. "not very sad, but still sad").

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xxlove.bugxx

"un" or "una" just means like "a" . so its saying "a little sad" just like how. "el" "la" "las" and "los" all mean "the" .

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbhijeetAgrawal

Can I write - sí, yo soy un poco triste? As 'yo soy' also means 'I am'.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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The verb ser (with the conjugation soy) is used to describe characteristics and for definitions. More like "This is what I am" instead of "how I am". If you define yourself as an "a little sad" person, then you can use this form.

Estar (with the conjugation estoy) is used to describe states and locations. If being sad is not the norm for you, you should use this verb form.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kae486202
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When should we use 'Yo soy' and 'Estoy'...they mean the same thing?

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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They don't mean the same thing. They are two different verbs that happen to have the same English translation.

Ser (with the conjugation soy) is used to describe identities, characteristics, and times of events:

  • Mi madre es cocinera. - My mother is a cook. (identity)
  • Soy muy alta. - I am very tall. (characteristic)
  • El concierto es el viernes. - The concert is on Friday. (time)

Estar (with the conjugation estoy) is used to describe conditions, states, and locations of objects:

  • Somos graves. - We are seriously ill. (condition)
  • La falda está sucia. - The skirt is dirty. (state)
  • ¡Estoy en el baño! - I am in the bathroom! (location)
4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CONNIE693624

there is no audio---reported

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ii6rr5
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Strange... the hover suggests somewhat which is a perfectly valid English word, but then it is not accepted...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Chosen1_

i want pizza

3 months ago
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