"¿Traes las maletas, por favor?"

Translation:Can you bring the suitcases, please?

7 months ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SnarlsBarky
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For the sake of consistency, "Can you please bring the suitcases?" should be allowed. This construction is accepted elsewhere in the lessons. Reported July 15.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay977736
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Or 'bring the suitcases please'

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimyankee1
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For a long time I thought the same way, until I finally realized that that would be a polite command. Therefore, "traes" would be changed to "trae." Here, it is a question not a command - hence "traes". I have been distracted by the questionable misuse of "can" in the translation and been missing this simple point.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnerbeginner

and I got dinged with this

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanHaney
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I agree that this should be accepted due to common use amongst native English speakers. However, it does expose what I consider to poor English because, literally, it is a request to know if one can bring them rather than a request for them to be brought.

So I would much rather have DL reject this in favor of 'Will you bring the suitcases, please?'

To me, the manner of requesting something by asking whether others 'can' do it is not only literally wrong but is less courteous/respectful.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DraeWright
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Actually, as an English speaker, I tend to be specific. If I am asking you to bring the suitcases I would say Please bring the suitcases, or ,Bring the suitcases, please: a simple request. And if I want to know if you can bring them I would ask, Can you bring the suitcases, please. Or, some version of that.

I find it stilted to be asked to append "can you" to a long list of Spanish verbs. I'm not being asked to translate but rather learn what the Duolingo team member wants me to notice, and answer only in that coded form--or-- I can't move forward. Annoying, but occasionally useful. And of course Duolingo is a great gift so take the hay and spit out the sticks.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
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DraeWright, the idea they are trying to convey is that English uses can more than Spanish uses poder.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AScam0
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Ahhh, wish they would tell us that :-) Bit hard to guess some of the things we are learning here :-)

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
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And, that's unfortunate, Daniel, because although very common, "can" is technically the way to express ability, not willingness. Fortunately, Duo accepts "Will you . . . ?" in all of these sentences, so my frustration level is much lower than that of many learners. :)

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
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How is it unfortunate? That's just how English works and how it has worked for a few hundred years.

Can originally expressed knowledge and was cognate with know. From know to know how to be able to be allowed. English teachers have been fighting this use for generations, but it's clearly a part of the language. The word changed slowly over the last thousand years. Since at least the 1800s can has expressed permission. Why try to roll back this change? Should we also not allow here and there in favor of hither and thither?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

And how do you know that they were not meaning ability instead of willingness?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
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You are correct about what has happened to the language, Daniel. But, that is what I believe is unfortunate. Think how much less controversy we'd have on DL if ability and willingness were still more clearly delineated! I accept that languages change, and usually only comment to note that "will you" is appropriate, as well as "can/could/would," because it is often omitted from the discussion.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mad.eleine

I always thought traer could also mean take?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sisi_rider
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Are you confusing it with tomar?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mad.eleine

No, I think that I thought this because "bring" can be replaced with "take" in a lot of sentences

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaelzion
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The alternate construction "Can you please bring the suitcases?" should be allowed. Thanks!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnerbeginner

traes prononced with an extra N. sounded like: tranes.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolin_o
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the location of please in this sentence in English is awkward; it would more likely be between the subject and the verb.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
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It sound fine to me. We often add a "please" to the end of sentences.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TykaBooker

Sounds fine to me too... There really is no reason to change the wording of the sentence and then report it as if it was wrong.

4 months ago
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